“Captivating. . . . [Look at Us] looks at the inner working of a marriage and the things that threaten it, including sexual frustrations that can crop up in a monogamous relationship. The ending is unsettling and memorable.”

Andrienne Cruz, Azusa City Library (Azusa, CA)

“Hodges is a new, valuable voice in the world of music making and music writing. She moves with elegance from her own experience as a violinist to the scientific underpinnings of her subject: from math, physics, and neurology to quantum mechanics, biology, and entanglement theory. Uncommon Measure is a welcome debut from a wonderfully talented writer.”

Annik LaFarge, author of Chasing Chopin

“In exquisite prose, Casey has built a city inside a book, a city that is a hospital, a museum, a dance, a body in ecstasy just outside the frame. On every page of this achingly beautiful book, Casey brings a wise and feral attention to the so-called incurables of the ‘era of soul science’—Augustine, Louise, Marie, Geneviève, and a chorus of nameless others singing their private beginnings and public ends.”

Danielle Dutton, author of SPRAWL and Margaret the First

“There is not a sentence in Hodges’s Uncommon Measure that does not illumine, not a single insight that doesn’t lead on to a still greater one, not a moment that does not open us to wonder. In searching and visionary prose, Hodges comes close to creating a new language, one of continual questioning and delight. This is an exquisite book to be read and reread, a treasure.”

Richard Hoffman, author of Half the House and Love & Fury

“This book holds truths of all kinds—private, studied, euphoric, libidinal, and unbecoming—each one a revelation.”

Jackie Polzin, author of Brood

“The novel’s somber exploration of American cruelty and religious intolerance is balanced by its nimble prose, sly wit, and engaging glimpse of a literary figure. Lock’s latest ambitious look at America’s history will delight fans of the series and earn new converts.”

Publishers Weekly

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Uncommon Measure is astonishingly assured and inventive. Mixing personal reflection, reportage, literary criticism, music theory, neurology, even evolutionary studies, Hodges has pulled off something singular and wonderful. From the first page to the last, the book rides on the high wire of Hodges’s virtuosic voice. It is shot through with a sinuous, luminous energy.”

Darcy Frey, author of The Last Shot: City Streets, Basketball Dreams 

“I would follow Maud Casey anywhere. In City of Incurable Women, she has given us her best work yet. This is a song for the forgotten, full of voices that will stay with you and guide you—an astonishing portrayal of rage and hope. What a glorious work of art and what a true gift to us.”

Paul Yoon, author of Snow Hunters and Run Me to Earth

Look at Us is a scrupulous dissection of a contemporary marriage in mortal peril. It’s also a wild ride of a novel, gorgeously written, by turns comic, lyrical, elegiac, disturbing, and profound. I couldn’t put it down until the startling conclusion, which arrived with such force I gasped. What a vision! Intense and chilling. Not to be missed.”

Valerie Martin, author of Property and I Give It to You

“A reflective and subtly poignant look at Nathaniel Hawthorne. . . . Lock displays a nimble virtuosity as he captures the speech of the time while demonstrating how the implicit bias, bigotry, and hypocrisy of Puritanism became the cancel culture of its day.”

Booklist

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“Iossel is a genius, a comic visionary in the tradition of Gogol, Keret, Barthelme, and Saunders. Love Like Water, Love Like Fire is a book of surprises and delights.”

Brian Morton, author of Starting Out in the Evening and Florence Gordon

“Natalie Hodges is a musician with a poet’s soul and a writer with a musician’s heart. Her prose partita, Uncommon Measure, is an extraordinary translation of music, devotion, and sorrow into the literary, recounting her relinquishment of a performance career and her continued love of music. In these pages, if no longer on the stage, she is brilliantly making us hear.”

Susan Faludi, author of Backlash and In the Darkroom

City of Incurable Women is a brilliant exploration of the type of female bodily and psychic pain once commonly diagnosed as hysteria—and the curiously hysterical response to it commonly exhibited by medical men. It is a novel of powerful originality, riveting historical interest, and haunting lyrical beauty.”

Sigrid Nunez, author of The Friend and What Are You Going Through

“Into the lives of a quiet upper-class professional family in Manhattan comes a new nanny, young Maeve from Ireland: suddenly the air is charged with erotic intensity. The mildness was all illusion: soon our central characters are all wreaking heavy damage upon one another. Toma draws his world with Cheeverian nuance and flair; he’s deeply insightful about the new American culture of ‘watchers’—but to me his greatest skill is his ability to summon pure terror.”

George Dawes Green, author of The Caveman’s Valentine, The Juror, and Ravens

“A distinctive and ambitious foray into literary history.”

Kirkus Reviews

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Love Like Water, Love Like Fire is an extraordinary book: funny and profound, moving and provocative. Rarely has life in the former USSR (or anywhere, for that matter) been portrayed with such a rich admixture of soaring observation and finely rendered detail. This is a gorgeously constructed collection by one of our wittiest and most insightful writers.”

Molly Antopol, author of The UnAmericans

“Splendid. . . . Lock masters the interplay between nineteenth-century Hawthorne and his fictional surrogate, Isaac, as he travels through Puritan New England. The historical details are immersive and meticulous.”

Foreword Reviews (starred review)

“Replete with an erudite wit and eloquent wisdom, Love Like Water, Love Like Fire is an extraordinary, thoughtful, and thought-provoking read.”

Midwest Book Review

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“[An] engaging collection. . . . While many stories illuminate the absurdity of Soviet society, Iossel conveys the brutal oppression of the surveillance state most intensely, and hauntingly, in the title story.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“Hanlon lovingly explores her own stretch of the New England coast and delivers it to the reader through sun and snow. A treat.”

Amy Van Keuren, Charter Books (Newport, RI)

“[A] vibrant collection. . . . With an ear for the clumsiness of Russian bureaucratic nomenclature, an eye for Kafkaesque humiliations, and a heart that embraces all the paradoxes of being a Soviet Jew, Iossel casts a spell over the reader. Reading like Sholem Aleichem updated by Bruce Jay Friedman, these stories reflect the exciting evolution of Russian Jewish literature.”

Publishers Weekly

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“Thoughtful and satisfying.”

Christie Olson Day, Gallery Bookshop (Mendocino, CA)

“Iossel brings his warm, gently ironic authorial voice to bear on the cruel and often surreal lives of Jews in the Soviet Union. . . . ‘There is love like fire, and there is love like water,’ say the Hasidic masters, and Iossel’s collection explores that dichotomy.”

Jewish Book Council

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“A splendid read.”

Viana Martinez, Fountain Bookstore (Richmond, VA)

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“A beautiful, lyrical book.”

Becky Doherty, Northshire Bookstore (Manchester Center, VT and Saratoga Springs, NY)

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“The former USSR continues to cast a long shadow on our current affairs, but Mikhail Iossel brings a fresh eye to the region. . . . Engaging equally with the absurdity and brutality of life in a repressive regime, [Love Like Water, Love Like Fire is] perfect for fans of Gogol and George Saunders alike.”

Chicago Review of Books

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“What distinguishes Iossel as a writer, aside from his obvious talent for atmospheric dramedy, is his lucid, musical prose style. . . . Iossel’s marvelous sense of rhythm dazzles the reader. We can’t stop turning the pages of this book.”

New York Times Book Review

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“[Hanlon] is as skilled at demystifying complex scientific concepts as she is in portraying gold-spangled waterline sunsets and muted winter compositions of marsh grasses. The whole is enriched with personal reflections on raising a family, aging, and the changing nature of marriage.”

Foreword Reviews

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“Graceful in its descriptive power. . . . Hanlon understands how our moral imagination exerts a profound influence on our thoughts, attitudes, and actions. . . . [Her] observations are as gently propulsive as the rhythmic stroke of a swim fin.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“In her charming debut . . . [Hanlon] turns the quotidian details of marriage and family life into a lyrical investigation of ‘something bigger and more complex than oneself.’ . . . Merging leisurely seaside adventure with ecological sensibilities, Hanlon delivers a lyrical ode to a changing environment.”

Publishers Weekly

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“Hanlon, in a year of swimming her way through marshes, across tidal rivers and sculpted granite quarries unique to Cape Ann, observes with a remarkably steady gaze all the world has to offer—the beauty and losses both. In clear, spare prose and fine-tuned observation, she takes you on a journey you won’t soon forget.”

Tim Traver, author of Sippewissett: Or, Life on a Salt Marsh and Fly Fishing and Conservation in Vermont

“There is nothing quite so wonderful as slipping into a creek and letting it carry you upstream until the tide imperceptibly turns and carries you back out toward the ocean. It is doubly wonderful to discover someone who describes this experience with such love, lyricism, and scientific curiosity. Let Hanlon be your guide to this world.”

William Sargent, author of The House on Ipswich Marsh and Plum Island: 4,000 Years on a Barrier Beach

“Hanlon’s narrative—spare and serene—flows to the rhythms of rising and falling water. Her account, rooted in the particular—nose level in a saltwater creek under the cerulean skies of an idyllic summer, or in icy slush on a dark winter night—is a timely call to consider the tragedies and possibilities of our moment.”

Deborah Cramer, author of Smithsonian Ocean: Our Water, Our World and The Narrow Edge: A Tiny Bird, an Ancient Crab, and an Epic Journey

“Written with a swimmer’s spirit, a naturalist’s eye, and an ecologist’s heart, this book took me to places I have never been. I loved it!”

Lynne Cox, author of Swimming to Antarctica: Tales of a Long-Distance Swimmer and Swimming in the Sink: An Episode of the Heart

Sergeant Salinger is a gift for anyone who would like to know more about the author who made Holden Caulfield a classroom name. . . . If you feel about Salinger as I do, I hope you will visit the pages of this insightful novel if for no other reason than to enjoy a great story.”

Linda Bond, Auntie’s Bookstore (Spokane, WA)

“Like Wendell Berry and Rachel Carson, Hanlon is a true poet-ecologist, sharing in exquisitely resonant prose her patient observations of nature’s most intimate details. As she and her husband, through summer and snow, swim their local creeks and estuaries, we marvel at the timeless yet fragile terrain of both marshlands and marriage. This is the book to awaken all of us, right now, to how our coastline is changing and what it means for our future.”

Julia Glass, author of Three Junes and A House Among the Trees

“An in depth look at one of our most celebrated of writers. . . . Charyn answers the question of how it was meant to be for Salinger to write that novel that unwittingly summoned the world.”

Comics Grinder

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“Charyn peers into the traumas that formed the lifelong recluse and his enigmatic stories. . . . The whole story makes for an engaging and informative rendering of an important American author.”

Historical Novels Review

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“Nuanced and acutely perceptive. . . . Charyn offers an astute psychological portrait of an elusive yet vastly compelling subject.”

Booklist

“Charyn deftly leaves the reader wondering whether Holden Caulfield’s teenage angst was really Salinger’s personification of post-traumatic stress disorder. . . . Engrossing.”

Library Journal

“This supremely engaging novel leaves us with a new, sometimes heart-rending understanding of [J.D. Salinger] and the times in which he came of age.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

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“[A] literary tour de force. . . . Charyn vividly portrays [J.D. Salinger’s] journey from slick short story writer to suffering artist. The winning result humanizes a legend.”

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

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“Intense and absorbing.”

The Reporter

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“Charyn wisely avoids the biographical novel’s penchant for the blow-by-blow, scene-by-scene recounting of all the important moments in the subject’s life. Instead we are immersed in the immediacy of war as Salinger . . . has to psyche out the phonies and somehow remain true to himself.”

University Bookman

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“Two intriguing suggestions are buried deeply in the story that Charyn tells so compellingly in Sergeant Salinger. One is that Salinger could have but chose not to write one of the great war novels of the twentieth century. (In a real sense, Charyn has done it for him.) The other is that Salinger’s experience of war drove him to explore only the inner lives of the characters he invented and to hide his own inner life from the generations of readers who revere him.”

Jewish Journal

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“Wonderfully recreates the war years of J. D. Salinger. . . . If you are looking for a more nuanced war novel, a story of World War II and what it did to the young men forced to fight it, this is the book for you.”

Michigan Daily

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“I loved [Her Here]. . . . You get caught up in the book very easily.”

Sandy Jones Boyd, Mountain Regional Public Library (Young Harris, GA)

“The protagonist of Modick’s quietly stunning novel is a renowned botanist who only in the last nine months of his long life truly understands the lessons of his obsession. . . . Presented as an addendum to the professor’s magnum opus, this diary-like narrative operates with the slow power and lyricism of true discovery.”

Laurie Greer, Politics and Prose Bookstore (Washington, DC)

“Beautiful debut about relationships between mothers and daughters, the intersection and fragmentary natures of memory and identity. Dennis’s writing is impressive—both precise and empathetic.”

Molly Harbage, Politics and Prose Bookstore (Washington, DC)

Her Here is a stunning debut from author Amanda Dennis. I was brought to the very edge of my sanity right along with the protagonist, Elena. The women in this story are complex and the ways their stories interconnect even more so. There were so many twists and turns I don’t think I accurately predicted even one plot development. It was suspenseful, raw, and every word absolutely crackled with intensity. Fans of Gillian Flynn take notice!”

Audrey Beatty, River Bend Bookshop (Glastonbury, CT)

“Thoughtful and thought-provoking.”

Midwest Book Review

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“Dazzling. Dennis is a writer that awakens the senses. From the first page, this gorgeous, haunting story about two lost girls ensnares the reader with such expertise, such intelligence and heart, that before long you’re lost inside the eerie sensuality of youthful dreams, witnessing obsession unravel identity.”

Dina Nayeri, author of Refuge and The Ungrateful Refugee

“In Her Here, Dennis has written a metaphysical investigation that is also a wonderfully personal account of a daughter coming to terms with the loss of her mother, and a mother coming to terms with the loss of her daughter. As Elena conjures Ella’s last days, the richly imagined narrative moves back and forth between Paris and Thailand, carrying both characters and readers to a vivid and suspenseful conclusion.”

Margot Livesey, author of The Flight of Gemma Hardy and The Boy in the Field

“Evocative and meditative, Her Here is a ghost story without a ghost, a marvel of incantatory wit. Dennis weaves a mesmerizing web around her subject, drawing the reader into an intricate, volatile mystery whose end is always and never within reach.”

Alexandra Kleeman, author of You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine and Intimations

“Amanda Dennis is in possession of hypnotic narrative gifts and a ferocious intellect. With Her Here, she has claimed her place in the literary world.”

Rebecca Makkai, author of Music for Wartime and The Great Believers

“A graceful, thought-provoking portrait of memory and mortality.”

Publishers Weekly

“[Moss] taps into a host of humanitarian and ecological concerns, even as it reminds the reader of the complex web of connections humans dwell within.”

Words Without Borders

“A powerful exercise in eco-fiction. . . . Modick’s writing, at its best, presents the ‘mossifcation’ of the mind, combining clinical observation with philosophical lyricism.”

Arts Fuse

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“[Moss] opens with the death of a renowned botanist, whose . . . hypnotic reflections and biographical recollections disavow the ‘botanist’s penetrating gaze’—its ‘classifications without real knowledge’—to arrive at a rejuvenating, anarchic conception of the natural world.”

Millions

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“A masterful examination of internal conflict, gratifying for readers inspired by ecofiction and literary theory. . . . Inner explorations transform into a Weltanschauung of epiphany and new understanding of love, death, and the natural world.”

Booklist

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“Dennis’ sensory prose leads to a fascinating exploration of identity, grief, and time.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“Wrenching and revelatory.”

Foreword Reviews (starred review)

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“Brings to life the two suffragists, Anthony and Stanton. . . . A thoroughly worthwhile read.”

Historical Novels Review

“Dennis’s elegant yet propulsive debut becomes much more than a missing-persons search. . . . Elena’s narrative-within-a-narrative nicely reveals the creative process, while Dennis’s larger story confirms the value of living boldly.”

Library Journal (starred review)

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“Superbly crafted. . . . Absorbing and memorable.”

Midwest Book Review

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“Amateur mycologists rejoice, we finally have our own Orchid Thief and it’s weird as hell.”

Sid S., Type Books (Toronto, ON)

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“Bewildering and unsettling. . . . This is the sort of book that will transform completely behind your back from one reading to the next.”

Douglas Riggs, Bank Square Books (Mystic, CT)

“Strange and glorious. . . . This slim novel is a challenging, thought-provoking adventure, perfect for fans of Haruki Murakami and Franz Kafka.”

Cindy Pauldine, River’s End Bookstore (Oswego, NY)

“A set of eleven stories from Catalan author Jordi Nopca, Come On Up is a solid collection of short fiction centered amidst our modern moment of frustrated ambitions, declining opportunity, and the 21st century paradox of unlimited choices and meaningless decisions. Nopca’s tales, situated in his hometown Barcelona, focus mostly on couples and interpersonal relationships, many with a deliciously absurdist bent. A caustic, sly humor and sardonic social malaise pervade Come On Up, but never in a disaffected, indifferent way—on the contrary, there’s a liveliness to all the listlessness. Also an award-winning journalist, Nopca’s storytelling and sharp wit are each remarkably entertaining. Come On Up employs a verve that is simultaneously of the times and contrary to its darker, deleterious impulses.”

Jeremy Garber, Powell’s Books (Portland, OR)

“Lock nimbly explores race, gender, and identity through a historical lens while displaying a joyous love of language.”

Booklist

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“Raucous, fantastical. . . . [An] imaginative exploration of late-19th-century America’s cultural tensions.”

Publishers Weekly

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“Wry yet tender, Nopca’s stories are a chronicle of the sentimental and existential doubts of Barcelona’s struggling younger generation—just trust me: read them.”

Jordi Puntí, author of Lost Luggage and This Is Not America

“Dark, carnivalesque. . . . American Follies features lavish period details and unsettling alternative world building, warping expectations and standing out for its rapier wit.”

Foreword Reviews

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“The day will come when there’ll be no need to keep repeating how Nopca’s talent and his corrosive humor have exploded and electrified the literature of Spain: it will be common knowledge.”

Enrique Vila-Matas, author of Bartleby & Co. and Mac’s Problem

“Jordi Nopca’s stories, written with clarity and flair, are smart and modern, filled with sharply observed detail. They capture the unease of the times and the flux of contemporary life in Barcelona with wit, wisdom, moments of pure hilarity, and a mixture of sympathy and dark laughter.”

Colm Tóibín, author of Brooklyn and House of Names

“A thrilling, unnerving portrait of 19th-century America. . . . One part novel of ideas, one part madcap adventure.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“All of the stories make noise, and some of them really take off.”

Publishers Weekly

“[Come On Up] movingly illustrate[s] the human shame of financial insecurity, with multidimensional characters that give life to sterile government jobless reports.”

Shelf Awareness

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“Ranging from the mysterious mushroom known by the name of Aseroë to Giorgione’s painting The Tempest, while meditating on the millions made off the work of Rimbaud, [Aseroë] offers a series of astonishing and detailed variations on the theme of the figures of forgetfulness.”

Claire Devarieux, Libération

Ragtime in a fever dream. . . . When you mix 19th-century racists, feminists, misogynists, freaks, and a flim-flam man, the spectacle that results might bear resemblance to the contemporary United States.”

Library Journal (starred review)

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“A young woman has disappeared, and her mother asks a dead friend’s daughter to reconstruct the young woman’s life from her diaries, in the hopes of stumbling on clues to where she may be. It’s a premise that would be a stretch for any novelist, but in her experimental debut Amanda Dennis wields that stretch the way a candymaker pulls and thickens ropes of sugar on hooks.”

Literary Hub

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“These short stories chronicle the romantic, intellectual, and economic frustrations of disparate characters. . . . From intellectual satire to slapstick comedy, [Come On Up] covers plenty of emotional terrain.”

Kirkus Reviews

“Delightfully witty, insightful, and masterfully told.”

Booklist

“A book filled to the gills with a veritable feast of literary ingredients. To read Aseroë is to experience a kind of inebriation as we drink in the intelligence and the talent of its author.”

Marie Étienne, La Quinzaine Littéraire

“[An] enigmatic and radiant book.”

Maurice Blanchot

“In this book oblivion is daylight.”

Éric Vuillard, Prix Goncourt award–winning author of The Order of the Day

“An immensely pleasurable read.”

Pascal Quignard, Prix Goncourt award–winning author of The Roving Shadows

“This over-the-top, extraordinary novel, in its no less stupendous translation, begins with a mycological intimacy that brings to mind the great mushroom scenes of the film Phantom Thread. How not to be aroused by this whopping treat of verbal virtuosity?”

Mary Ann Caws, author of The Modern Art Cookbook and Creative Gatherings: Meeting Places of Modernism

“[Nopca’s] stories skillfully traverse decadence and depravity, splendor and squalor, the tragic and the comic, the boring and the absurd.”

Cleaver Magazine

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“What a wonderful piece of writing! What an exhilarating adventure! What a madcap exploration of mushrooms, paintings, Rimbaud, the legend of Orpheus, and the mazes of a poet’s mind, in a jigsaw puzzle of a book that ultimately (like Alice’s Wonderland) makes absolute sense!”

Alberto Manguel, author of The Library at Night and Fabulous Monsters: Dracula, Alice, Superman, and Other Literary Friends

“Provocative, funny and sobering.”

Washington Post

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“Spellbinding. . . . Wholly engrossing. . . . This hypnotic and deeply cerebral exploration is a seductive escape. Through Ella and Elena’s efforts to reconstruct a sense of self—outside family, beyond academia and expectation—through language, Dennis confronts the various ways we try to understand ourselves and others.

Washington Post

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“Filled with caustic wit and pointed satire . . . [Come On Up] paints a sympathetic portrait of people trying to adapt to the instability that defines their ‘new normal’.”

World Literature Today

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“Full of wonder. . . . Aseroë is a lyrical contemplation of how words affect reality.”

Foreword Reviews

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“Fiercely original.”

Kirkus Reviews

“In Lethem’s witty translation from Catalan, the 11 stories [of Come On Up] are heartbreaking and hilarious, tender and violent.”

New York Times Book Review

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“A singular novel. Aseroë’s storyteller speaks from within the grasp of mysterious and urgent preoccupations. Yet his confident narration, rich in colorful, familiar detail, and sensitively and gracefully rendered into English by master translator Richard Sieburth, assures us of his obsessions’ importance to him and, within his brilliant and bizarrely convincing world, increasingly to us.”

Lydia Davis, author of Can’t and Won’t and Essays One

“Charyn conjures up a narrative punctuated with powerful imagery. . . . In a novel full of its share of the grotesque, it takes an artist with a precise touch such as Charyn to achieve such artful results.”

Comics Grinder

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“Deftly written and original. . . . Unreservedly recommended.”

Midwest Book Review

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“Charyn has created a terrific cast of original characters who speak in a language that reflects the selfish and predatory nature of that time. . . . He tells a fascinating story of resistance against evil with a great deal of energy.”

Historical Novels Review

“A complex and detailed story of the inner workings of the German Third Reich during World War II. . . . Highly recommended.”

Library Journal

“[Charyn’s] taut story line is full of surreal visuals and elaborate illusions.”

Booklist

“[An] edgy, hallucinatory, full-throttle fable.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

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“Spectacular. . . . This extraordinary tour de force showcases [Charyn] at the top of his game.”

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

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“Darkly resonant. . . . [A] convention-upturning tour de force.”

Washington Independent Review of Books

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“A breakneck adventure. . . . It’s a dark art to make a subject this grotesque quite this much fun.”

Wall Street Journal

“Charyn’s blunt, brilliantly crafted prose bubbles with the pleasure of nailing life to the page in just the right words. Cesare is by no means lightweight fare, but it’s provocative, stimulating and deeply satisfying.”

Washington Post

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“Reading The Bear will bring you back to the wonder-filled stories of childhood, the sort that linger, that alter our understanding of the world, that shape who we become. Such is the simple and profound power of Andrew Krivak’s unexpectedly hopeful novel. Crafted with as much care and mastery as the finest oaken bow, this is a book that manages to be both timeless and urgent, clear-eyed and tender-hearted, archetypal and unconventional: a bedtime tale told by a prophet. A wonder in itself.”

Josh Weil, author of The New Valley and The Age of Perpetual Light

“A tight yet expansive novel in prose so vivid you forget these are words and not the cedar, trout, and stones of a post-Anthropocene Earth. Through the middle of The Bear walks an unnamed girl whose determination to go on living will fill you with awe.”

Salvatore Scibona, author of The End and The Volunteer

“In spare and lovely prose, Andrew Krivak folds the deep past and the far future into a remarkable fable about our inheritance as humanity makes a harmonic return to the spirit and animal worlds. This book follows you, like a river under ice.”

Adam Johnson, author of The Orphan Master’s Son and Fortune Smiles

“If you liked the isolation, survival, and life-learning lessons of Where the Crawdads Sing, The Bear is a great read.”

Taylor Woods, Mid-Continent Public Library (MO)

“This book combines the elegiac, hauntingly spare prose of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road with the vivid nature writing of Jack London, plus a dash of magical realism. . . . The writing is beautifully evocative, through each season and habitat.”

Maree Watkins, Fairfax County Public Library (Fairfax, VA)

“Very beautiful. . . . As harrowing as The Martian. . . . In these kind of scary, uncertain times, not only do you get tips for survival, but . . . ultimately this feeling of hope for how humans might complete the circle of their existence on Earth.”

Karen Stern, Lucius Beebe Memorial Library (Wakefield, MA)

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“A wondrous take on love, loss and the natural world.”

Diane Scholl, Batavia Public Library (Batavia, IL)

“Hauntingly beautiful, written in a poetic style, I highly recommend The Bear.”

Judy Sebastian, Eastham Public Library and Friends of the Eastham Library (Eastham, MA)

“Like a prismatic series of artist’s sketches, Pain Studies offers a dazzling variety of perspectives—personal, political, phenomenological, lyrical—on the unanswerable question of human suffering. Through virtuosic readings of everything from pre-Socratic philosophy to the trial transcripts of Joan of Arc to the cultural semiotics of House M.D., Lisa Olstein brilliantly extends the literature of pain into our contemporary historical moment. But this searching work also illuminates how pain studies us. Turning the last page on Olstein’s agonistic anatomy, we’ve come to know one of hurt’s intimate acquaintances, unbroken by her suffering, or if broken in parts, then painstakingly remade.”

Srikanth Reddy, author of Voyager and Changing Subjects: Digressions in Modern American Poetry

“I ended up reading this in one sitting because I enjoyed it so much. . . . The words were simple and honest, but the picture they painted was delightful.”

Lauren Rhodes, St. Louis County Library (St. Louis, MO)

“In Pain Studies, Lisa Olstein paints a sharp-witted and insightful picture of the rollercoaster ride that is called pain. Her own experiences allow her to approach the topic in a way that provides relevant reading to anyone treating or living with chronic pain. As doctors, we need to find more effective ways to help patients dealing with pain. This book is a step in that direction.”

Jill Heytens, M.D., neurologist

“This was a book that really makes you think about the future and the choices that we as humans are making today.”

Courtney Reynolds, John Tomay Memorial Library (Georgetown, CO)

“This adult fable touches on themes of family, the environment, the struggle for survival, and the need for harmony with nature. I enjoyed meeting the Bear, the Puma, and the fierce unnamed female narrator who was stronger than I could ever imagine. This one is compelling.”

Kelly Moore, Carrollton Public Library (Carrollton, TX)

“Lisa Olstein offers readers an eclectic and deeply personal set of meditations on pain as experienced and remembered, inflicted and endured, perceived and denied. Through neuroscience, literature, and history, from hit TV shows to classical philosophy, this is a unique and fascinating contribution to the literature of pain in general, and migraine in particular.”

Katherine Foxhall, author of Migraine: A History

“Stunning. . . . Krivak gives us a startling view of the future; of being alone and trying to understand a world that no longer exists.”

Janette McMahon, Fremont County Library System (WY)

“Profound and unforgettable. . . . Beautifully demonstrates the enduring strength and sensibility of the natural world.”

Joanna Kluever, Julia Hull District Library (Stillman Valley, IL)

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“Add me to those who loved The Bear by Andrew Krivak. This is one of those books that seems simplistic at first and then completely draws you in to its world.”

Joseph Jones, Cuyahoga County Public Library (Brooklyn, OH)

“Not only a thought provoking read, [The Bear] serves as a potential origin story for a future full of limitless possibilities in which man is no longer a dominate force. A must read for grown-up fans of C. S. Lewis’s The Chronicles of Narnia.”

Lynn Harlan, Calvert Library (Frederick, MD)

Pain Studies takes a good long look at how bodies (human ones) experience and manage the wide spectrum of pain and discomfort. . . . A very fun and fast-paced read.”

Nefertiti, Brookline Booksmith (Brookline, MA)

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“This beautiful book about survival and community moved me deeply.”

Krista Feick, Columbus Metropolitan Library (Columbus, OH)

“Lovers of language take note: the act of reading this book is truly an experience.”

Karissa Fast, St. Catharines Public Library (Saint Catharines, Ontario)

“[Olstein’s] words carve out fissures of understanding and deep, familiar meaning in what it means to have chronic pain—that there is meaning in it.”

Lindsey Moore, BookPeople (Austin, TX)

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“Refreshing. . . . A simple story written with an unflinching but compassionate voice, Krivak’s tale should be thoughtfully savored while it slowly winds its way into your moral conscience.”

Kyle Evans, Springfield-Greene County Library (Springfield, MO)

“Gorgeous prose and luscious descriptions of the natural world. Krivak reminds us of our own frailty and the fierce bond between human and animal.”

Lillian Dabney, Folio: The Seattle Athenaeum (Seattle, WA)

“Unique, remarkable, and beautiful.”

Kelly Currie, Delphi Public Library (Delphi, IN)

“A book to savor.”

Andrienne Cruz, Azusa City Library (Azusa, CA)

“Heartbreaking. . . . It has been nearly two months since I finished The Bear and I’m still ruminating on its melancholy yet somehow hopeful ode to the beauty the natural world has to offer.”

Christopher Clark, Eisenhower Public Library (Harwood Heights, IL)

“[There are] six splendid stand-alone novels in Norman Lock’s The American Novels series. . . . Feast Day of the Cannibals is the latest book in the series. . . . As in his previous novels, Lock both presents an engrossing storyline and a vivid sense of life in late 19th-century Manhattan.”

Our Man in Boston

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“Olstein writes with eloquence and power. . . . To someone living with chronic pain, this book is pure catharsis, a warm voice in an endless tunnel of dark saying ‘I hear you. I understand you.’ To anyone else, this book is the first step toward empathy. Pain Studies must be read by all.”

Laura Graveline, Brazos Bookstore (Houston, TX)

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“Very enjoyable.”

Kayla Campbell, Plum City Public Library (Plum City, WI)

“Transcendent. . . . Simply amazing.”

Mike Wysock, The Book Stall (Winnetka, IL)

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“Krivak definitely has a gift for unique stories and I know my patrons will really enjoy his work.”

Meagan Brown, Cromaine District Library (Hartland, MI)

“A truly moving story laced with a delicate insight into both the fragility and resilience of mankind.”

Max Blanchette, Merrimack Public Library (Merrimack, NH)

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“Immerses the reader in nature and explores man’s relationship with the surrounding life.”

Kari Bingham-Gutierrez, Olathe Public Library (Olathe, KS)

“This book reminded me to marvel at nature and its raw and innate strength. And to also marvel at the tenacity of the human spirit and how we are all shaped by our world and our experience.”

Melissa, Western Sullivan Public Library System (NY)

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“Lyrical. . . . By the end of the novel, the reader is led to accept particularly difficult aspects of the novel’s reality that overlap with our own—that the world will endure without us, that natural cycles of birth and death will continue, and that human intelligence is not the only kind to have a lasting impact on the life of the planet.”

Joseph, Spartanburg County Public Libraries (Spartanburg, SC)

“A young girl and her father live alone in a mountain forest that fronts a lake in a devastated world. She learns from him how to live off the land, hunting for food, and finding shelter. The Bear is the moving story of a journey they make together to the ocean, and the bear who helps her find her way back home. For fans of The Dogs Stars (Heller) and The Road (McCarthy).”

LibraryReads citation, Sandy Jones Boyd, Mountain Regional Public Library (Young Harris, GA)

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“A stunningly quiet, simple, and perfect book.”

Kay Wosewick, Boswell Book Company (Milwaukee, WI)

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“One of the best reads I’ve had in a long time.”

Doloris Vest, Book No Further (Roanoke, VA) on Book City Roanoke podcast

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“Krivak’s little gem of a book has some of the lushest, loveliest nature writing you’ll ever read, but in addition to that, it has the timeless feel of a fable. . . . I never knew that a tale about humanity’s end days could be so quietly powerful, and leave me with a sense of peace and optimism.”

Erika VanDam, RoscoeBooks (Chicago, IL)

“This is humanity at its purest form—a primal love story to our place among the wild things. Stark and beautiful.”

Robin Templin, Watermark Books & Café (Wichita, KS)

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“This was such an interesting book. Not very long, but the way the prose felt slow and meaningful pulled me in and made me slow down to read it. . . . When I finished, I felt like I’d had an experience, not just read a book.”

Izzy Stringham, Bookbinders Basalt (Basalt, CO)

“Flora and fauna further a companionless young woman’s education in survival in The Bear. I fought tears throughout the girl’s journey: her story is THAT BEAUTIFUL!.”

Kayleen Rohrer, InkLink Books (East Troy, WI)

“This book is majestic! A beautiful and poignant tribute to nature and the resiliency of the spirit.”

Rachel Oriatti, Anderson’s Bookshop (Downers Grove, IL)

“Read The Bear to be transformed.”

Laura Mills, Brazos Bookstore (Houston, TX)

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“Beautiful, poignant and magical. . . . I loved and savored every single word.”

Seth Marko, Book Catapult (San Diego, CA)

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“A lovely, emotional tale.”

Jackie Mann, Anderson’s Bookshop (La Grange, IL)

“A modern day fable with lessons on how to reconnect with the natural world. . . . Precise and beautiful.”

Robert Lingle, Off the Beaten Path Bookstore (Lakewood, NY)

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“An exquisite tale of all living things existing in beautiful balance and has one of the most perfect endings of any book I’ve read.”

Gaël LeLamer, Books & Books (Miami, FL) in the Miami Herald

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“Both timeless and of the moment, this moving, elegant fable for adults is the perfect antidote to our fast-paced, anxious lives. . . . A transcendent, luminous book that will stay with you.”

Shane Khosropour, Unabridged Bookstore (Chicago, IL)

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The Bear is a beautifully written modern fable. . . . It feels both timeless and very much of our time, as it plays on anxieties about climate change and the end of human civilization.”

Kathleen Keenan, A Novel Spot Bookshop (Etobicoke, Ontario)

“Poetically written. . . . This book takes a bleak and played-out genre and gives it a new twist. An immersive story not quite about the end-times, but about new beginnings.”

Daniel K., Prologue Bookshop (Columbus, OH)

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“Incredible.”

Harrison Jahnke, Country Bookshelf (Bozeman, MT)

“The more time I spend thinking about [The Bear], the more astonished I am at just how damn good it is.”

Lane Jacobson, Paulina Springs Books (Sisters, OR)

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“Achingly beautiful.”

Joelle Herr, The Bookshop (Nashville, TN) in the Nashville Scene

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“A story anyone can connect with.”

Maggie Henriksen, Carmichael’s Bookstore (Louisville, KY)

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“Ancient in its rhythm and content, Andrew Krivak’s The Bear reads as a folktale from an entirely possible, fast-approaching future. The lives that may very well be lived by the last of us are lyrically and lovingly articulated across these pages.”

Jack Hawthorn, Raven Book Store (Lawrence, KS)

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“[The Bear] should have a permanent spot on your shelf.”

Kristin Enola Gilbert, Exile in Bookville (Chicago, IL)

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“Tender and lyrical, beautifully descriptive and with just enough suspense to temper the story, The Bear is divine.”

Lee Virden Geurkink, Monkey and Dog Books (Fort Worth, TX)

“I read some wonderful books this year, but this fable . . . is something my mind returned to over and over. It is a small, beautiful book.”

Kelly Estep, Carmichael’s Bookstore (Louisville, KY)

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“Thoughtful and thought-provoking.”

Midwest Book Review

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“Sad and beautiful and hopeful all at the same time. . . . I love the philosophical take on how humans fit into nature.”

Teri Den Herder, UCSD Bookstore (La Jolla, CA)

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“Krivak’s nature writing is simply divine. This lyrical fable has a few white-knuckled moments, but it’s the story’s tender spirituality that kept me up reading through the night.”

Emily Crowe, An Unlikely Story Bookstore & Café (Plainville, MA)

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“A slow-burning tale of repression and sublimation, a work that tells a tale of obsession and the violence that ensues.”

Vol. 1 Brooklyn

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“Erudite. . . . Olstein’s blending of the personal and the academic is compelling. . . . A quality addition to the literature on pain.”

Kirkus Reviews

“What a balm to read a book so lovely that moves at a measured pace in this fast-paced age. . . . This is a book that takes the reader to heart: a story to be savored, a grace to be received.”

Sheryl Cotleur, Copperfield’s Books (Northern California)

“An irresistible—and utterly strange—experience. A novel you must read to believe.”

Justin Walls, Powell’s Books at Cedar Hills Crossing (Beaverton, OR)

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“While Moby-Dick is often referenced by the characters, it’s Billy Budd, a later work of Melville’s, that’s alluded to thematically, as Lock addresses questions of desire and repression, both personal and societal. . . . [Feast Day of the Cannibals] memorably provides a window into old New York and its narrator’s conflicted mind.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“A sparsely told story that leaves you questioning whether we are more than just our memories.”

Sydne Conant, A Room of One’s Own (Madison, WI)

“Krivak writes so poetically, despite the many sad moments in the story, reading it was a relaxing escape.”

Gabbi Cisneros, Porchlight Book Company (Milwaukee, WI)

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“I could not put down The Bear. Although an easy read, the masterful storytelling of Andrew Krivak challenges readers with ideas of survival and adventure amidst loss. . . . A simply beautiful read.”

Heidi Carter, Bogan Books (Fort Kent, ME)

“This slim novel is part adventure story, part fantasy and part love story to the world of nature.”

Tim Budd, Prairie Lights (Iowa City, IA) on Iowa Public Radio

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“Beautifully written. . . . [The Bear] is a fable that will move into your heart as well as your mind, and stay there forever.”

Linda Bond, Auntie’s Bookstore (Spokane, WA)

“Beautiful. . . . Will grab you and not let go.”

Karen Bellovich, Anderson’s Bookshop (LaGrange, IL)

The Bear is a beautiful throwback to folk tales and fairy tales, while at the same time paying tribute to the dystopian books of today.”

Miranda Atkins, A Little Bookish (Ooltewah, TN)

“Fascinating. . . . [Pain Studies] succeeds in delivering an intriguing look at a set of questions with wide relevance.”

Publishers Weekly

“An essential novel for our times, The Bear encapsulates the essence of isolation and our connection to the natural world.”

Jenna, Eagle Harbor Book Co. (Bainbridge Island, WA)

“Part starkly real survival story, part dream-like fable: I devoured this in one sitting.”

Dawn, Next Page Books & Nosh (Frisco, CO)

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“A beautiful elegy on the transience of life. . . . The Bear will transport you to another time and place and make you feel the simple beauty of being alive.”

Charlie, Towne Book Center (Collegeville, PA)

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“This is as close to a perfect novel as I’ve read. . . . Krivak is working with the care and atmosphere of Denis Johnson’s Train Dreams and the dire sentimentality of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, but is tuned to a higher and more eternal frequency. I will treasure The Bear, and am so glad it exists to counterbalance these futile, furious times.”

Robert Martin, Independent Booksellers Consortium Executive Director

“Widely relatable and deeply moving.”

Audible

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“This timely, emotional fable about the dual powers of nature and human endurance is profound in its simplicity. Like all the best fables, the wisdom of Krivak’s tale lingered long after we finished it.”

Apple Books

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“In a world drowning in careless excess, The Bear suggests another way, and the rewards are great.”

Seattle Book Review

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“As heartwarming as a novel about the end of the world can get. . . . The Bear is a beautiful and breathtakingly sad cautionary tale about a future that’s becoming ever more believable.”

The Lineup

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“This is a novel that can change perceptions of the Earth and our place in it.”

BookBrowse

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“Grabs readers’ attention, even those without a history of chronic illness. . . . Its analysis spans multiple perspectives and includes Olstein’s sincere recollections, making this extended lyrical essay shine.”

Library Journal

“Uplifting and beautiful, Krivak has written a gem of a fable; a portrait of survival that comes full circle.”

Paperback Paris

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“Infused with compassion and hope. . . . Krivak’s prose fills the reader with awe for the greatness of nature.”

Electric Literature

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“A dreamy, poetic novel that imagines a (nearly) humanless Earth as a thing of beauty.”

BuzzFeed

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“A lovely, unforgettable experience.”

Foreword Reviews

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“Engrossing and elegant, Feast Day of the Cannibals captures America’s kaleidoscopic spirit during a tumultuous, rapacious era.”

Foreword Reviews

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“The power of a classic myth. . . . Krivak’s lyrical tribute to the natural world and the necessity for humans to coexist with it is an essential message cloaked within an allegory of haunting beauty.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

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“[Krivak’s] sentences are polished stones of wonder. . . . The elegiac tone reflects what is lost and what will be lost, an enchantment as if Wendell Berry had reimagined Cormac McCarthy’s The Road.”

Booklist

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“Olstein is a poet, which is clear in the quality of her language. [Pain Studies] is rich, absorbing, and suggestive.”

Book Riot

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“Dazzling, puzzling, ornate, arcane, and deeply intelligent.”

Literature, Arts and Medicine Database

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“Like an artist’s drawings of a bird or a human hand, Olstein’s studies show us pain from dozens of angles so that we eventually see its whole shape.”

Brevity

“Unexpectedly bright and punchy. . . . [Olstein] drops the heavy mantles of pain writing and dips, like a swimmer, into the ways that pain infiltrates and orients a bodymind, into the ways that it arranges a life.”

Avidly

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Pain Studies is an excavation—no mere poking around!—of pain and transcends the restraints of either prose or poetic forms. . . . Olstein achieves a gorgeous mosaic . . . to produce remarkable work.”

Literary Review

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“Deft, ingenious. . . . This is raw physicality in words. . . . Take the journey, read it. It’s brain, blood, pain, life, and death; poetry in prose, a book that must be read and lived.”

Lone Star Literary Life

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“Engagingly different. . . . Unfolds in graceful, luminous prose.”

Library Journal (starred review)

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“Lock’s latest entry in his superb American Novels series again features his remarkable eye for historical detail and fine-tuned felicity with the language of the period. At times, the sparkling prose is nearly indistinguishable from that of the authors Lock so clearly admires, Melville, Hawthorne, and Thoreau. . . . The mellifluous language, literary allusions, and some subtle Moby-Dick parallels, such as Melville using a harpoon to kill rats in the hulls of ships, will delight fans of classic American literature.”

Booklist

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“[Olstein] lays down shimmering prose that subtly unhinges the reader, conveying what it’s like to see the world from a migraine’s point-of-view. . . . Pain Studies is all the more powerful because its content is echoed by its form. It builds in fragments and bursts of prose. Its colors are vivid and brilliant.”

Adroit Journal

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“A moving post-apocalyptic fable for grown-ups. . . . Ursula K. Le Guin would approve.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

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“With artistry and grace . . . Krivak delivers a transcendent journey into a world where all living things—humans, animals, trees—coexist in magical balance, forever telling each other’s unique stories. This beautiful and elegant novel is a gem.”

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

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“In the spirit of Maggie Nelson’s The Argonauts and Joan Didion’s The Year of Magical Thinking. . . . Think of Pain Studies as a kind of travel literature, a Gulliver’s Travels-like guidebook for those visiting the land of pain.”

Rain Taxi Review of Books

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“Beautiful. . . . A powerful allegory about the struggles and graces of life.”

America Magazine

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“Olstein succeeds marvelously when directly reflecting on her own pain and her attempts to treat it. An accomplished poet, she often uses language beautifully and inventively.”

New York Times Book Review

“These spectacular sentences chart a thrilling investigation into pain, language, and Lisa Olstein’s own exile from what Woolf called ‘the army of the upright.’ On a search path through art, science, poetry, and prime-time television, Olstein aims her knife-bright compassion at the very thing we’re all running from. Pain Studies is a masterpiece.”

Leni Zumas, author of The Listeners and Red Clocks

“[A] thoughtful, meditative exploration of humanity’s place in the world.”

WBUR The ARTery

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“Stellar. . . . The powerful impact of this slim, exquisite novel reveal[s] the wisdom of the natural world.”

WOSU All Things Considered

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“There’s a transcendence in Krivak’s prose.”

Addison Independent

“Draws you in immediately.”

Virginian-Pilot

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“Defies categorizing. . . . Immense in its truths.”

Harvard Press

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“Lisa Olstein’s remarkable Pain Studies is a book built of brain and nerve and blood and heart, about what it means to live with pain. Irreverent and astute, synthesizing the personal and the historical, popular culture and poetry and visual art, Pain Studies will change how you think about living with a body in our beautiful and doomed world.”

Elizabeth McCracken, author of Thunderstruck and Bowlaway

“A lyrical fable for fans of soft apocalypse. . . . You’ll find yourself wanting to read sentences aloud for the full affect.”

The Sound

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“Transfixing. . . . This historically authentic novel raises potent questions about sexuality during an unsettling era in American history past and is another impressive entry in Lock’s dissection of America’s past.”

Publishers Weekly

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“A beautiful, gripping, thought-provoking exploration of human rewilding and nature’s dominion.”

Winnipeg Free Press

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“Lisa Olstein’s luminous meditation on pain winds around a beautifully curated series of artifacts. Bits of poetry, ancient medicine, brain science, television episodes, excerpts from the trial of Joan of Arc, and works of art support the spiderweb on which her insights hang like condensed mist. A fascinating, totally seductive read!”

Eula Biss, author of Notes from No Man’s Land: American Essays and On Immunity: An Inoculation

“[A] tender apocalyptic fable . . . endowed with such fullness of meaning that you have to assign this short, touching book its own category: the post-apocalypse utopia.”

Wall Street Journal

“This spectacular work will delight and awe readers with Lock’s magisterial wordsmithing.”

Library Journal (starred review)

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“A penetrating parable of suburban family life. . . . Millás tells a compelling story of human connection in a way that is sometimes crude but also darkly funny, insightful and ultimately surprising.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

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“Spectacularly bizarre. . . . A Kafkaesque story about transformation and our collective human desire to connect with one another.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“Riveting. . . . One of those novels that will linger in the mind and memory of the reader long after the book itself is finished.”

Midwest Book Review

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“Arresting, exquisite. . . . The Bear is more than a parable for our times, it’s a call to listen to the world around us before it’s too late.”

Observer

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“Fascinating yet sad. . . . Utterly compelling to read.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

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“[A] moving novel. . . . O’Connor’s bleak, powerful story serves as an affecting homage to a girl whose community failed to protect her.”

Publishers Weekly

“Beautiful. . . . So loving and vivid that you can feel the lake water and smell the sea. . . . A perfect fable for the age of solastalgia.”

Slate

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“O’Connor’s poignant tale addresses numerous relevant and timely issues, from cultural anxiety to female empowerment or the lack thereof, and the painful and often tragic condition of eating disorders.”

Booklist

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“A moving, masterful story. . . . O’Connor’s recreation of this world and its people is haunted and haunting, with marvelous poetry and human sorrow resonating in every line.”

Historical Novels Review

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“Lyrical. . . . Gorgeous. . . . Krivak’s serene and contemplative novel invites us to consider a vision of time as circular, of existence as grand and eternal beyond the grasp of individuals—and of a world able to outlive human destructiveness.”

Washington Post

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Feast Day of the Cannibals is the first of [Lock’s American Novels] to explore the lives of 19th-century men who felt a sexual attraction to each other. . . . [His] recreation of a past time and place is impressive, but his signal achievement in this novel is the voice of its narrator, Shelby Ross. . . . Lock does not merely imitate 19th-century prose; he makes it his own, with verbal flourishes worthy of Melville.”

Gay & Lesbian Review

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“A compelling stew of comedy, philosophy, and even tragedy, From the Shadows maintains a light touch, even as sinister undertones bubble underneath.”

Foreword Reviews

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“The real miracle lies in the capacity of Sarah’s singular, dark fate to illuminate the socioeconomic, religious, scientific, philosophic, and political cultures and conflicts of [the] time. . . . A transcendent historical novel.”

Foreword Reviews (starred review)

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“O’Connor takes the story of Sarah Jacob, one of history’s most noteworthy fasting girls, and turns this 150-year-old tale into a freshly poignant commentary on family dynamics and the treatment of women.”

Miracle Monocle magazine

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The Bear is a luminous book of a standard one sees perhaps once every generation. . . . As [it] tenderly breaks your heart, piece by piece, it fills that void with something powerful and timeless. Written with precision, clarity, and gentle fluidity, The Bear reminds us that all we need to know awaits us in the wild.”

Pete Takeda, Mountain Book Competition Jury citation

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“At the center of Varley O’Connor’s novel The Welsh Fasting Girl is a single, horrifying question: what happens when an idea becomes more important than a person—and what happens when that person is a girl? . . . A searing critique. . . . It is one of the only places I have been reassured, in literature or otherwise, that when our morbid wonder towards eating problems ends, our understanding of the individual’s pain might begin.”

Barrelhouse Magazine

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“Part surreal comedy, part dark parable, Millás’s wild work brings readers face to face with the mundane facets of middle-class suburban life. . . . A page-turner of the strangest order, Millás’s debut stuns and entrances. It’s impossible to put down.”

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

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“An entertainingly presented look at social isolation and dependency.”

Complete Review

“A fable of survival in a consumerist society.”

Seattle Review of Books

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“I became enthralled as the mystery of a young girl’s death by starvation unfolds, revealing layers of secrets about family life amid religious and cultural conflicts. Varley O’Connor is a splendid storyteller.”

Lynne Sharon Schwartz, author of Disturbances in the Field and Two-Part Inventions

“Incredibly strange, truly bizarre—one of the most original stories. . . . Impossible to put down.”

Shelf Unbound

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“The compact, surreal story . . . is uproarious and unnerving in equal measure, and is far too riveting to put down.”

Thrillist

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“Hilarious and unique.”

Crime Reads

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“Millás makes the incredulous believable. A seductive narrator, brisk dialogue, and a unique claustrophobic setting contribute to a distinctive blend of Kafka’s surrealism and Pirandello’s absurdism. . . . A quick, riveting read.”

World Literature Today

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“Spectacularly surreal and cerebral. . . . [From the Shadows] carves a labyrinthine path through a mind withstanding both physical and mental confinements, and the language, rife with darkness and comedy, traces the fine walls of worlds both real and imagined with Kafkaesque soliloquy.”

Asymptote Journal

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“In this richly textured and compelling novel, Varley O’Connor proves to us that human desire is never simple and that our noblest wishes sometimes provoke our darkest deeds.”

Mary Morris, author of The Jazz Palace and Gateway to the Moon

“Begins as entertaining slapstick, subtly metamorphoses into fable. . . . As [the narrator’s] vivid imaginary world fuses with reality this deceptively ethereal novel advances toward a dark and startling finale.”

Wall Street Journal

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“Varley O’Connor’s beautiful and brilliant novel takes us deep into the mysteries of virtue’s conspiracy with evil and the human spirit’s war against itself. With spot-on historical detail and scintillating language, the novel fascinates and moves us, and uses the story of a nineteenth-century Welsh farm girl to deliver cogent insights into contemporary issues regarding gender and family.”

Stephen O’Connor, author of Orphan Trains and Thomas Jefferson Dreams of Sally Hemings

“It’s a strange and winsome feeling I have, reading Tacoma Stories, the blue sensation that Richard Wiley has made me homesick for a place I’ve never been, mourning the loss of friends I never had, in a life where each and every one of us is loved, however imperfectly. Think Sherwood Anderson inhabiting Raymond Carver’s Northwest and you’ll have a clear picture of Wiley’s accomplishment.”

Bob Shacochis, author of Easy in the Islands and The Woman Who Lost Her Soul

“Richard Wiley is one of our best writers. These stories satisfy in the way that brilliant short fiction always satisfies; one feels as if one has absorbed the expansive vision and drama of a novel. Read slowly, and I bet you’ll want to read again.”

Richard Bausch, author of Peace and Living in the Weather of the World

Murmur by Will Eaves is a really extraordinary book, unlike any other. He’s in a class of his own.”

Max Porter, author of Grief Is the Thing with Feathers

“Will Eaves’s Murmur is masterful—compassionate, principled, and moving. It is deeply wise, with the aching loneliness of both human indignity and dignity, despair and courage.”

Anne Michaels, author of Fugitive Pieces and All We Saw

“Vivid and as varied as you can get. . . . Amusing, chilling, and sometimes downright bizarre, readers of short story collections with a unified theme will enjoy this.”

Barbarian Librarian

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“Tender and funny, Murmur takes the tragic story of Turing’s life and punishment and ingeniously transforms it into something glittering, subversive, and even triumphant. Eaves has built a magnificently challenging memorial to one of the great twentieth-century martyrs.”

Patrick Gale, author of Rough Music and A Place Called Winter

“Very highly recommended. . . . While the narratives are all strong individual stories, presented together as a whole they create a masterful collection and reflection on life over the decades.”

She Treads Softly

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Murmur is a profound meditation on what machine consciousness might mean, the implications of AI, where it will all lead. It’s one of the big stories of our time, though no one else has treated it with such depth and originality.”

Peter Blegvad, author of The Book of Leviathan

“It takes a certain literary brilliance to convey the conscious and unconscious mind of one of history’s greatest intellects. Will Eaves eloquently probes the boundaries between dreams, perception, and reality, prompting the reader to examine the recesses of their own labyrinthine psyche. A seamless dialogue between art and science, and fact and fiction.”

Heather Berlin, Ph.D., M.P.H., neuroscientist and host of Science Goes to the Movies and Startalk All-Stars

“An extraordinarily entertaining read from cover to cover.”

Midwest Book Review

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“There is science, there is art and there is Jungian symbolism. . . . For all its challenges, Murmur is also beautiful [in its] willingness to embrace opacity, its portrayal of the labyrinthine paths along which thought proceeds, and its exhilarating ambition to test Alec’s belief that ‘[a] mind can’t prove or step outside itself’ by inviting us to step out from ours, and into his.”

New Statesman

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Murmur is boldly different from anything else written about Turing.”

Times

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“Eaves has achieved one of the pinnacles of novelistic endeavour: he has given deep thought to human experience, and in doing so brought to life the ‘self-conscious wonder’ of thought itself.”

Times Literary Supplement

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“Wiley shines in the short form, absorbing the reader in slices of one town and its inhabitants while rendering them universal.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

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“Exceptionally poised and elegant. . . . Murmur is a poignant meditation on the irrepressible complexity of human nature and sexuality, and a powerful indictment of the cowardice and groupthink that sustain state-sanctioned barbarism. It also poses timely questions about the digital world Turing’s pioneering work helped bring about.”

Irish Times

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“Compelling. . . . The genius of [Tacoma Stories] is that the relationships between characters and their backstories add depth to each entry, but the individual tales are still strong enough to stand on their own.”

Foreword Reviews

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“This linked set of seriocomic stories that hopscotches across a half-century . . . emphasizes unlikely transformations over time—and, as the title suggests, the role of place in those transformations. And though Wiley juggles plenty of characters, he has a light touch that’s fitting for a book rooted in the free-wheeling ’60s.”

Kirkus Reviews

“Captures beautifully the pith and precision of Turing’s own prose. . . . One of Eaves’s great accomplishments is to make the aesthetic questions raised by [Murmur] as significant as the ethical ones.”

Financial Times

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The Flip lucidly lays out a way of thinking about the enfolding of mind and reality that is at once empirically scientific and at the same time consistent with all we know from some of our most sophisticated philosophical and spiritual traditions. Jeffrey J. Kripal provides a practical guide to a deeper and more effective understanding of ourselves and our world. Read this book if you want to actively contribute to the development of a worldview that will be of extraordinary benefit to humankind and our planet.”

David E. Presti, author of Foundational Concepts in Neuroscience and Mind Beyond Brain

“An extraordinary exploration of dreams, consciousness, science and the future.”

New Scientist

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“Wiley’s antic, wrenching collection of 14 interlocking stories reveals the subtle connections among a dozen characters whose unpredictable lives evolve through the decades in the title city. . . . [It] provides a tentatively affirmative answer to the question raised by a fictional version of the daughter of Orson Welles and Rita Hayworth: ‘Do you think a town can act as a hedge against the unabated loneliness of the human heart?’”

Publishers Weekly

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“Tacoma is underrepresented in literature, so this book presents a tremendous opportunity.”

Seattle Review of Books

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“Read[s] well as a literary version of a concept album with a unified theme.”

Tacoma Weekly

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“Jeffrey J. Kripal is one of the most important voices pushing the academy to broaden its perspective beyond the secular: to take seriously the idea that reality is more complex. He is slowly winning the argument and changing the terrain of debate without making an argument for any one religion. This is a remarkable achievement. The Flip is worthy of a wide readership.”

T. M. Luhrmann, author of When God Talks Back and Our Most Troubling Madness

“In The Flip, Jeffrey J. Kripal reflects deeply on non-ordinary experiences that transform people’s way of understanding themselves and the world. Kripal uses an imaginative transdisciplinary method that weaves together contemporary thought in ecology, quantum physics, evolutionary biology, philosophy of mind, comparative mysticism, and first-person experiential accounts. The result is an eminently readable manifesto for the role of the humanities in integrating emergent thought in these many domains. Prophetically, the larger goal is nothing less than transforming humanity toward a greater wisdom community that can move beyond many of our most intractable problems and dysfunctions.”

Bradley Lewis, author of Narrative Psychiatry: How Stories Can Shape Clinical Practice and Depression: Integrating Science, Humanities, and Culture

“A marvelous mixture of humor and contemplative nostalgia, Tacoma Stories shows us that cities are more than just a collection of buildings, landmarks and roads. They’re a delicate web of lives and stories, each one connected in ways we might never expect.”

Puget Sound Trail

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“[Wiley] is able to articulate a familiar and endearing world of Tacoma, humanizing the city to a reader who may not have even heard of the ‘City of Destiny.’”

Tacoma Ledger

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“One reads in the hope of delight. And that’s what [Tacoma Stories] provides. The linked stories that make up the collection are deeply pleasureful reads.”

Mark Jacobs, Peace Corps Worldwide

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“Wiley’s characters are far from absurdist; it might even be accurate to say that they are mid-to-late 20th-century approximations of Chaucer’s pilgrims . . . all starting out together from Tacoma on a journey through adulthood. . . . Across the pilgrimage of their lives, we see a slow burnishing of their hopes and dreams, but also of their failures. Tacoma itself, like Dublin in James Joyce’s Dubliners, also asserts its own force of character. . . . Wiley has finally given his city the loving touch it deserves.”

Ann Neelon, Peace Corps Worldwide

( link)

“Makes the baffling notions of quantum mechanics and neuroscience digestible. In this respect, The Flip is similar to The Lives of a Cell: Notes of a Biology Watcher by Lewis Thomas. . . . The research incorporated into the book is well thought out, and ranges from writer Philip K. Dick to mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan. Kripal even discusses how Joni Mitchell came up with the idea that ‘we are stardust’ ten years before Carl Sagan popularized it. . . . The Flip did open my mind to the fact that there are leading experts in both the field of science and religion (Kripal himself) who are pushing toward unification and the extinction of out-dated knowledge.”

NewPages

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“Offers plenty of points to ponder.”

Kirkus Reviews

“[The Flip] will ignite conversations about the limits of science and the potential for dramatic shifts in perspective.”

Publishers Weekly

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Murmur is a restrained and elegant exploration of cause and effect, and the meaning of life and love.”

BBC judges’ citation

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Murmur is a fully achieved literary experiment, digging deep into all the dimensions of human consciousness.”

Goldsmiths Prize judge’s citation

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“Eaves’ playful, fiercely intelligent interpretation of aspects of the life of a character who closely resembles the brilliant, multifaceted Alan Turing is a dreamlike wonder of memory and consciousness. Its ways are mysterious, its effect deepens with every reading.”

Republic of Consciousness Prize judge Catherine Taylor in the Guardian

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“I can’t say enough great things about Eduardo Halfon’s novels. His newest, Mourning, translated by the incredible Lisa Dillman & Daniel Hahn is no exception.”

Mark Haber, Brazos Bookstore (Houston, TX)

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“Wonderfully rich. . . . Reading this book is an embodied experience; it is yoga for the mind. The Flip is an important book that deserves a broad readership both inside and outside the academy.”

Reading Religion

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“Halfon’s magnificent prose and abundant storytelling prowess work in tandem to create an irresistible style. . . . As with the ghostly, evocative trails of smoke that have adorned each of Halfon’s English edition covers, Mourning is possessed by traces of the ethereal, the mysterious, and the shadowy. . . . [It] functions wonderfully as the third volume in Halfon’s bittersweet, doleful inquest into family folklore, remembrance, and indelible generational anguish.”

Jeremy Garber, Powell’s Books (Portland, OR)

( link)

“[Murmur will] grip your mind in the very first pages, break your heart halfway through, and in the end, strangely, unexpectedly, restore your faith in human beings and their endless capacity for resilience.”

Wellcome Book Prize chair of judges Elif Shafak in the Guardian

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“A warmly vivid account of various science-minded people who have experienced the ‘Flip’. . . . Passionate and often funny.”

Guardian

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“Halfon’s writing hits a virtual ecstasy.”

Jonas Mekas, director of As I Was Moving Ahead Occasionally I Saw Brief Glimpses of Beauty at Electric Literature

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“[The Flip] synthesizes some of the most recent speculations about the nature of the cosmos and the human, proposing a renewed mutual engagement of the sciences and humanities. . . . With its visionary notions and revisionary potential, The Flip merits a wide readership, across the academy and outside of it.”

Houston Chronicle

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“Scrupulous, humane . . . [Murmur] is as bracingly intelligent as it is brave. . . . [Eaves] knows that Turing’s theories of consciousness have implications for fiction, and that fiction can operate at the frontiers of what we know about the workings of our minds.”

Guardian

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“One of the most provocative new books of the year, and, for me, mindblowing.”

Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma and How to Change Your Mind

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“A deftly crafted read from beginning to end. . . . Extraordinary and unreservedly recommended.”

Midwest Book Review

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“Complex and erudite. . . . [Murmur] bears reading twice.”

Library Journal

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“[Halfon] clarif[ies] in fluid, accessible language that however slippery, memory is essential to who we are.”

Library Journal

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“Exquisite. . . . This novel will submerge readers in contemplation and dazzling prose as it captures the essence of mind and matter.”

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

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“Halfon spins a bewitching tale. . . . Careful, arresting prose brings everything together in a moving, evocative story of the narrator’s bloodline.”

Publishers Weekly

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“An unforgettable exploration of one family’s fluid, collective memory.”

Booklist

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“Gripping. . . . A wildly inventive and moving exploration of the human mind.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

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“With his slender but deceptively weighty books, which are at once breezy and melancholic, bemused and bitter, [Halfon] opens up worlds to readers in return.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

( link)

“Beautiful and hallucinatory. . . . From extreme isolation and suffering springs a vision of universal connectedness.”

Wall Street Journal

“Part Jorge Luis Borges, part Sholom Aleichem. . . . Halfon is the sort of traveler who admits he knows nothing, yet finds enlightenment everywhere. Mourning emits some little illumination of human nature on every page.”

Rumpus

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“Evocative. . . . Mourning is a mystery, a drama and a fictional memoir. It is a book that manages to be both melancholy in tone yet triumphant in spirit.”

Jewish Boston

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“Powerful, gorgeous. . . . Halfon gives an unforgettable, haunting voice to lesser-known populations of the Jewish diaspora, including Latin American and Lebanese Jews. Mourning shows how the weaving together of diasporic families across cultures and places creates ripples through generations.”

Jewish Book Council

( link)

“A careful, precise story that explores the many facets of loss and healing.”

World Literature Today

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“Brimming with subtle mystery, inquisitiveness, oddity, coincidence, and melancholy. . . . A highly entertaining tragedy, a fascinating page-turner.”

Asymptote Journal

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“Elegant and meditative.”

Words Without Borders

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“Halfon is a master.”

Smithsonian magazine

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“A feat of literary acrobatics.”

New York Review of Books

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“Weissmann’s project is to show how science and culture aren’t as distant as often thought, and the best of the essays are wonderfully stimulating and exciting in how they make this point. . . . Admirers will be captivated anew.”

Publishers Weekly

“Expertly hopscotch[es] across all sorts of topics. . . . Weissmann’s humanist, sometimes sardonic, voice binds together disparate strands to show how all human endeavor is linked. . . . Weissmann clearly sees how history obfuscates the work of women, people of color and immigrants, and tries to alter that. . . . Anyone with an interest in American scientific or literary history will enjoy this collection.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“Highly accessible, entertaining. . . . Every current theme, including buzz about free radicals and the 2014 Ebola outbreak, is tempered with a historical anecdote. Here, too, are cautionary concerns about henna tattoos, reminders to beware of ‘alternative science,’ and lots of humor. Weissmann’s science writing is juicy and conversational.”

Booklist

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“Essays that brim with knowledge and bubble with attitude.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“A rich layering of past, present, science, and literature to present diverse takes on the issue at hand. . . . Weissmann not only endeavors to connect the realms of literature and medicine, but also to create community among readers in light of class, race, religion, and age.”

Glassworks Magazine

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“This beautifully written novel provides a new perspective on the 19th century and it’s charming to imagine the character of Emily Dickinson as Norman Lock has written her.”

Amanda Holmes Duffy, Politics and Prose Bookstore (Washington, DC)

( link)

“Amnesty International UK endorses Alpha because it provides insight into the realities of migration and the desperate search for a better life.”

Nicky Parker, Publisher of Amnesty International UK

“[A] consistently excellent series. . . . Lock has an impressive ear for the musicality of language, and his characteristic lush prose brings vitality and poetic authenticity to the dialogue.”

Booklist

( link)

“The lively passages of Emily’s letters are so evocative of her poetry that it becomes easy to see why Robert finds her so captivating. The book also expands and deepens themes of moral hypocrisy around racism and slavery. . . . Lyrically written but unafraid of the ugliness of the time, Lock’s thought-provoking series continues to impress.”

Publishers Weekly

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“The emotion of Barroux’s simple art and layouts pulled me along on Alpha’s journey. This book stands out, along with Don Brown’s The Unwanted, from other graphic novels about the current refugee crisis.”

Gene Ambaum, co-creator of Unshelved and the Library Comic

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“Lock deftly tells a visceral story of belief and conflict, with abundant moments of tragedy and transcendence along the way.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“In [Charyn’s] enchanting writing, the glory is in the details.”

Comics Grinder

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“A searing tale of our time. . . . Once you read this deeply troubling book, passing by, looking away, is no longer an option.”

Michael Morpurgo, author of War Horse and An Eagle in the Snow

“Perceptive and contemplative. . . . Bring[s] the 1840–60s to life with shimmering prose.”

Library Journal (starred review)

“[Charyn] is a writer of great passion, lyric and empathy. . . . These essays flow from the page with realism and from an author who knows the truth.”

North of Oxford

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“A valuable collection, both an effective primer for readers new to Charyn’s work and an intriguing read for those already familiar, showing off his skills as a memoirist and a culture writer in equal measure.”

Foreword Reviews

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“Takes us to the human soul of the migrant crisis and the exploitation they face.”

Daily Record

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“Groundbreaking. . . . Stunning text.”

Guardian

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“Deeply personal. . . . Readers will delight in encountering Charyn’s New York City. . . . From his ruminations on seeing classic studio-era films during his South Bronx childhood in the 1940s and ’50s to an account of a day spent with Mayor Ed Koch in the mid-’80s, Charyn’s prose enchants. . . . Longtime fans and those new to Charyn’s work alike will enjoy this distinctive glimpse into one author’s influences.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Artistically presented. . . . Interesting in technique and storytelling. Lock quotes Emily Dickinson: She dealt her pretty words like Blades —. Lock does much the same in this novel.”

North of Oxford

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“Lively essays. . . . A very personal view of the past artfully brought to vivid life.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“Powerful. . . . Charyn composes an autobiography of essays, sharing lessons learned from a lifetime of love for leading ladies, literature and language.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“A powerful graphic novel that is also suitable for young adults. . . . [Alpha’s] first-person account of his ‘adventures’ devolves into a living nightmare as the journey drags on with a constantly changing group of companions. The prose is simple, and the story is told without embellishment. . . . The illustrations set a mood of haste and simplicity, appearing to be marker sketches—almost as if they could have been made on the journey. . . . It will be difficult to look upon the plight of any refugees without reflecting on Alpha’s journey.”

Shelf-employed

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“[Alpha’s] tale of smugglers, fake passports, wasted bribes, and desperate migration is happening today. . . . Great graphic novels, like great novels, can spread the gift of empathy.”

Illustration Concentration

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“[A] unique work in comics. . . . The fate of the immigrant is in crisis across the globe, including in the United States of America. Books like Alpha help to educate the public and help to build toward a safer and more merciful world.”

Comics Grinder

( link)

“Accessible and brimming with erudition. . . . Charyn writes with passionate precision about writers, films and filmmakers, about New York’s marginalized classes, and all manner of cultural icons. . . . [He] deftly blends the stories of his own life with the stories of those whose ordeals, failures, and victories hold special meaning for him as symptomatic of the American experience. . . . Wherever he takes us, Charyn’s mind is always agile, and his prose is stunningly electric.”

Jewish Book Council

( link)

“[Alpha] breaks from the traditional dynamic graphic novel format of panels and speech bubbles. Rather, Bessora’s expressive words serve as captions to the half-page illustrations. . . . Subtle elements of collage are incorporated; small photographs, often of young children, peek into the fore- or background of certain scenes. . . . This stark, poetic story personalizes immigration. For all libraries.”

School Library Journal (starred review)

( link)

“With his customary linguistic verve and pulsing imagination, Jerome Charyn serves up here some of the tastiest essay writing available. He knows and loves New York past and present, and he draws on a lifetime of raucous experience and dedicated reading for a rich, heady, satisfying brew.”

Phillip Lopate, editor of The Art of the Personal Essay and author of A Mother’s Tale

“Intense, atmospheric, and suspenseful.”

Neshama Franklin, Marin County Free Library (San Rafael, CA)

( link)

The Wreckage of Eden is a huge and dark fresco of an army chaplain’s journey through very difficult and troubling periods of American history (normally denied us in school), and all the while this fine angle of approach is like a slow cinematic zoom and track onto an elusive Emily Dickinson ensconced in her Amherst.”

The Brothers Quay, award-winning film directors

“A migrant’s harrowing journey to follow his wife and son to Paris from Côte d’Ivoire unfolds in an illustrated narrative that . . . movingly depicts Alpha’s challenging passage.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Lays forth the many forms of devastation suffered by lives adrift while introducing memorable characters.”

Library Journal

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“A compelling tale. . . . Heartbreaking and timely.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“The plight of the refugee is brought to brutally vivid life in this visual diary. . . . By homing in on the experience of one symbolic individual, Alpha humanizes the too-often faceless tragedy.”

Booklist

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“To those who say that ‘illegal’ migrants are line-jumpers, [Alpha] . . . is a vivid retort.”

The Common

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“The text is blunt, matter of fact, but also painfully deep and poetic. . . . [The illustrations] effortlessly complement the text. . . . The washes of greys and blacks stain the page much like tears. This powerful book is an important one. It needs to be in the hands of every citizen of the world, so they can, for a moment, peer into the plight of others and, perhaps, reshape how refugees are viewed.”

Literature, Arts and Medicine Database

( link)

Alpha is the story of everyone who bravely risks all they know for the hope of a better future. . . . Honest and direct rather than inspiring and romantic, Alpha gives a name and face to the multitudes in refugee camps all over the world. An important story for all of us to know.”

New York Journal of Books

( link)

“Gives readers a deep sense of what it takes to survive and the terrible toll war and loneliness extracts not only on those who go to war but also those waiting at home.”

North of Oxford

( link)

“As political debates and news reports on immigration proliferate, rare is empathetic reportage of the actual experiences and desperation these migrants face. . . . Alpha is that compassionate link. . . . ‘You can’t wash away the dust,’ Bessora writes. ‘It’s not just in the streets—the dust has settled in people’s hearts.’ Alpha: Abidjan to Paris draws a refugee with empathy and compassion, in an effort to lift the dust in people’s hearts.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“Intimately told. . . . Masterfully composed. While immigration may be a contentious political issue, Alpha reminds us of the people behind the headlines: those who inhabit the smugglers’ compartments in rickety trucks, pay for fake passports, and trust their lives to boats that are barely seaworthy, all in search of a better future for themselves and their families.”

Foreword Reviews

( link)

Wolf Season takes contemporary war-and-mil-writing preoccupation with dogs to its fantastical-yet-logical extension. . . . Rin and Naema are compellingly drawn, as are Rin’s daughter Juney and Naema’s son Tariq and the three wolves, Gray, Silver, and Ebony. Most striking, however, are two male characters, Louis Martin and Todd Wycombe, both veterans struggling to be men worthy of respect.”

Time Now

( link)

“[Benedict is] at the top of her game here. . . . The wolves indeed have the last word in Wolf Season, much as do the dogs in David Wroblewski’s The Story of Edgar Sawtelle. Benedict’s final chapter is appropriately titled ‘Howl,’ which brings to mind Allen Ginsberg and his poem of the same name—with its line ‘monstrous bombs!’ in canto II. Yet perhaps Ginsberg’s line from one of his other poems, ‘America,’ best sums it all up: ‘America when will we end the human war?’ Helen Benedict’s Wolf Season certainly gives us ample reasons to consider doing so.”

Woven Tale Press

( link)

“A powerful picture of the limits of compassion and the knee-jerk nature of emotions: prejudice directed against immigrants and the fear of wolves.”

BookBrowse

( link)

“Compelling. . . . Benedict doesn’t shy away from her characters’ very different faults as they grasp for courage and resilience during their dark times.”

Booklist

( link)

“Gripping. . . . A low level of dread builds slowly, drawing readers toward the inevitable climactic clash, though Benedict’s memorable and complicated characterization is the true highlight.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Glassley and his fellow geologists went on six expeditions to one of the world’s most remote lands to study ancient evidence related to plate tectonics. In evocative prose, he describes their research and the startling beauty of Greenland, and speculates on the nature of perception and the wonder inspired by wilderness.”

San Francisco Chronicle, “Top Shelf” Recommendation from Bay Area independent bookstore Face in a Book (El Dorado Hills, CA)

( link)

“Affecting. . . . The ‘very long reach of war’ transcends generations.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“Unflinching. . . . In a book that deserves the widest attention, Benedict ‘follows the war home,’ engaging readers with an insightful story right up until the gut-wrenching conclusion.”

Library Journal (starred review)

“The best way to make moral choices is to understand the experiences of others. And fictional literature like Wolf Season can take us to a heightened level of understanding about the experience of war.”

Michigan Daily

( link)

“To say Wolf Season is merely a portrait of the war at home . . . would be misleading. Benedict’s ambitions are far more sweeping, for the fears and prejudices that motivate her characters mirror the dilemmas in the ongoing war on terror.”

American Book Review

( link)

“Like other great art, Wolf Season . . . show[s] us how deeply moved we can be by lives and experiences that bear little resemblance to our own.”

In the Fray

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“Cuts right into the current tenor of American culture, with characters who are haunted by the violence of war.”

Neworld Review

( link)

“Extraordinary insight and sensitivity . . . offering a unique and multi-dimensional perspective on women as veterans today in the U.S.”

HuffPost

( link)

“The novel moves between striking passages that speak war’s truth and heartfelt stories about how women—and mothers—experience war and its aftermath. While there are male soldiers in Wolf Season, women’s experience is at the forefront. . . . Told with honesty and empathy, Wolf Season is a contemporary tale about how the war always comes home.”

Washington Independent Review of Books

( link)

“The international refugee crisis is given a singular expression in this affecting work.”

PEN America

( link)

Wolf Season is honest about suffering, trauma, and the difficulty of healing after war. . . . [The novel] reminds us that we do what’s best for our family—our pack—even if it’s the thing that hurts the most.”

Chronogram

( link)

“This Walden-esque reflection on wilderness and humanity’s relationship to it will have you shivering along with Glassley and his colleagues in their tents, and wondering at the awe-inspiring age of the rocks they study and what it teaches us about the ancient history of our planet.”

San Francisco Chronicle, “Top Shelf” Recommendation from Bay Area independent bookstore Napa Bookmine (Napa, CA)

( link)

“A fascinating gem of a book about a geological exploration of Greenland that leads to a scientific breakthrough.”

San Francisco Chronicle, “Top Shelf” Recommendation from Bay Area independent bookstore Copperfield’s Books (San Rafael, CA)

( link)

“We’re a bit swoony-eyed about A Wilder Time. . . . Glassley joins the ranks of naturalist writers who make talking about rocks and lichens sexy with this witty and engrossing memoir of time spent wandering about on Greenland. . . . His enthusiasm is infectious and his wonder at this wild place is inspiring.”

NW Book Lovers “Face Out” selection by A Good Book Café (Sumner, WA)

( link)

“As geologists, we may be rational scientists, but expeditions to remote places touch something deep in us that moves us to also be poets. Glassley has turned his experiences in Greenland into searingly beautiful descriptions of a wild landscape and the ways in which that landscape moves and changes him. Every sentence is evocative, connoting curiosity, awe, and respect in equal measure. A Wilder Time is a paean on the importance of wilderness to the human spirit and a saddening reminder of what we lose when we divorce ourselves from contact with wild places. Glassley’s voice will stay with me the way the works of Loren Eiseley, Edward Abbey, Rachel Carson, and Aldo Leopold have stayed with me over the decades.”

Jane Selverstone, professor emerita in the Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences at the University of New Mexico

“While conducting research probing deep time and the origin of continents, Glassley discovered a further source of fascination: the Arctic wilderness of Greenland. In A Wilder Time, he shares his encounters with unvarnished nature still free—for now—from the corruptions and constructs of human settlement. With openness, clarity, and a keen eye for detail, he weaves adventure, research, astonished awe, and thoughtful reflection into an absorbing account of his sojourns.”

Martha Hickman Hild, author of Geology of Newfoundland: Field Guide

“Glassley’s A Wilder Time is a wonderful mix of science and poetry. It delves into the kind of spiritual effect that wilderness has on those privileged to work in it and how it changes the way we experience and understand our surroundings and our lives. The science, including the geological controversy at the heart of the book, is lucidly explained, and readers will be absorbed by the story Glassley tells as well as his many vividly described encounters with nature. Next time someone asks me why I am a geologist, I will just hand them this book.”

William L. Griffin, professor of geology at Macquarie University

“[Benedict] has such a compassionate and yet clear-eyed understanding of the myriad costs of war. Blew my mind.”

Ayelet Waldman, author of Daughter’s Keeper and Love and Treasure

( link)

“Brilliant and unforgettable, DeSanders’s autobiographical fiction takes us deep within the human psyche and the human heart, and delivers us to a uniquely strange and ambivalent grace.”

Rick Whitaker, author of Assuming the Position and An Honest Ghost

“While conveying the geological hypotheses, techniques of data collection, and adventures of his expeditions to Greenland with his two Danish colleagues, Glassley also brings startling sensory precision to his descriptions. The velvety feeling of moss, the taste of lichen, the alternating rhythms of terror and fluidity in schools of fish through which a predatory sculpin cruises—such experiences bring what might have seemed a stark world of rock and ice alive. This delicacy of perception is the vehicle through which not only the scientific quest but also the profound mystery of our living Earth saturates this memorable book.”

John Elder, coeditor of The Norton Book of Nature Writing and author of Picking Up the Flute

“No one writes with more authority or cool-eyed compassion about the experience of women in war both on and off the battlefield than Helen Benedict. In Wolf Season, she shows us the complicated ways in which the lives of those who serve and those who don’t intertwine and how—regardless of whether you are a soldier, the family of a soldier, or a refugee—the war follows you and your children for generations. Wolf Season is more than a novel for our times; it should be required reading.”

Elissa Schappell, author of Use Me and Blueprints for Building Better Girls

“Benedict masterfully summons characters who don’t share her biography: she’s a civilian getting sympathetically, and accurately, inside the minds of soldiers; a Westerner intimately addressing the concerns of Middle Eastern refugees; someone with the vivid power of sight imagining the equally vivid experience of the sightless; an adult bringing child characters to life.”

Jay Baron Nicorvo, author of The Standard Grand, at Literary Hub

( link)

“Rollicking, tilted, and transporting. As the young narrator tries to manage her fraying family—war-wounded father, suffering mother, misbehaving relatives galore—DeSanders takes us deeper, always with such tenderness and beautiful observation into the ways we shape a narrative that keeps us whole.”

Victoria Redel, author of Loverboy and Before Everything

“The Iraq War. Disability. Women on and off the battlefield. AND WOLVES! . . . [An] extraordinary new novel.”

Caroline Leavitt, author of Pictures of You and Cruel Beautiful World, at Carolineleavittville

( link)

“Glassley exhibits an uncanny ability to put us in the midst of Greenland’s vast silence, where he takes us deep into the planet’s soul. It is an important and well-told adventure that opens us to life’s grand expanse and begs us to follow in spite of the brevity of our existence.”

John Francis, author of Planetwalker and The Ragged Edge of Silence

“Fierce and vivid and full of hope, this story of trauma and resilience, of love and family, of mutual aid and solidarity in the aftermath of a brutal war is nothing short of magic. Helen Benedict is the voice of an American conscience that has all too often been silenced. To read these pages is to be transported to a world beyond hype and propaganda to see the human cost of war up close. This is not a novel that allows you to walk away unchanged.”

Cara Hoffman, author of Be Safe I Love You and Running

“DeSanders’s genius lies in her ability to capture the intimate interiority of a very particular childhood while at the same time interrogating larger questions of class, race, and religion. Hap and Hazard and the End of the World is a gorgeous, profoundly original novel.”

Dawn Raffel, author of Carrying the Body and The Secret Life of Objects

“In this extraordinary narrative, Glassley, a geologist, describes his intimate relationship with Greenland’s ancient rocks in such a fashion that the reader who knows nothing about geology is hooked; that reader feels like he’s not only been transported to the rockribbed coast of West Greenland, but is also bent down and studying its rocks right along with Glassley. At the same time, the book reminds us of the degree to which climate change is damaging the planet. . . . Urgently recommended!”

Lawrence Millman, author of Last Places and At the End of the World

“A novel of love, loss, and survival, Wolf Season delves into the complexities and murk of the after-war with blazing clarity. You will come to treasure these characters for their strengths and foibles alike. Helen Benedict has delivered yet again, and contemporary war literature is much the better for it.”

Matt Gallagher, author of Kaboom: Embracing the Suck in a Savage Little War and Youngblood

“Bessora’s prose and Barroux’s illustrations join to illuminate the heart-wrenching journey of a West African refugee. . . . The reader is drawn into the refugee’s experience and shares his agonizing odyssey via the graphic novel’s blunt yet poetic language.”

World Literature Today

( link)

“[Benedict] has emerged as one of our most thoughtful and provocative writers of war literature.”

David Abrams, author of Fobbit and Brave Deeds, at the Quivering Pen

( link)

“Diane DeSanders writes the sort of prose that gives that telltale tingle down the spine, prose that paints vivid pictures in the mind and presents an entire, unique world: the Lone Star State, the state of America, the state of childhood, the state of a traumatized father, and the state of being a girl, of being wonderfully and truly alive.”

Sheila Kohler, author of Becoming Jane Eyre and Once We Were Sisters

“Very few people have spent as much time as William E. Glassley in such deep wilderness. So it would behoove us to pay attention even if he had not brought back such a fascinating, lovely, and useful set of observations. This is a remarkable book.”

Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature and Oil and Honey

“Very highly recommended. . . . A Wilder Time is a celebration of wilderness, written in poetic prose that can be appreciated by anyone who enjoys good nature writing. It is also a call to save the wilderness areas we have left.”

She Treads Softly

( link)

A Wilder Time is nature writing at its informative and inspirational best and unreservedly recommended.”

Midwest Book Review

( link)

“A poetic, metaphysical and philosophical treatise on the wildness of life on earth. . . . [Glassley’s] enthusiasm for geology is palpable. His love of the wild is tangible, and his way with words beautiful.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“Thoughtful. . . . Evincing humility in the midst of the great ‘unshaped wild,’ Glassley exudes a palpable and infectious sense of wonder.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Delectable. . . . Autopsy of a Father provides commentary on France’s societal attitudes on race and immigration. This will lead to hours of discussion in itself. I highly recommend this captivating novel.”

Underrated Reads

( link)

“Poetic, enthusiastic. . . . Combining the strengths of travel writing and lyrical memoir, Glassley translates his own ‘incandescent experience of place’ into a conservation message: ‘We must share and celebrate the wild so that it might be saved.’”

Foreword Reviews (starred review)

( link)

“Impressive. . . . This deftly crafted and inherently fascinating book is unreservedly recommended.”

Midwest Book Review

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“[A] deftly translated . . . deftly crafted and inherently fascinating read by an impressively talented novelist. . . . Unreservedly recommended.”

Midwest Book Review

( link)

“A weighty book full of conversations that are still topical.”

IndiePicks Magazine

“DeSanders achieves a heartbreaking, lyrical, and laser-focused evocation of a child’s perception of the mysteries of the adult world; the perfectly rendered setting is 1940s Dallas, just when its harsh rural beauties were becoming sanitized into suburban conformity.”

Historical Novels Review

“[Kramer’s body of work is] precise and sumptuous . . . a song of emotion, but with a great lucidity about the humanity of simple people.”

Swiss Federal Office of Culture, Swiss Grand Prize for Literature citation

( link)

“Incisive, insightful, and discomfiting. . . . Autopsy of a Father belongs on the shelf next to works by authors like Nadine Gordimer and Magda Szabo. Its psychological investigation of a crumbling intelligentsia and a family fallen from grace is absolutely riveting. Robert Bononno’s translation does great justice to this quiet and unsettling thriller.”

Foreword Reviews

( link)

“Smart and subtle. . . . [A] moving example of a family trying to make life work.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Perfectly captures life near Dallas after World War II, as seen through the eyes of a child. . . . Funny and nostalgic and occasionally unsettling, this child’s view of her own small world also provides a picture of the wider world at that time.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“[A] captivating debut novel. . . . Drawing on her own family letters, diaries, and oral histories, newcomer DeSanders captures the voice and thoughts of a young girl observing her frayed family while questioning the mysterious larger world. A brave and honest work that won’t disappoint.”

Library Journal

“A time capsule of American awakening.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“Paints a vivid picture of childhood in postwar America, replete with all of the joys and sorrows that are part of growing up.”

Booklist

( link)

“Profound and moving. . . . A superb tool for a better understanding of the natural world and why real science matters.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

( link)

“[Autopsy of a Father] delves into anti-immigrant sentiment and the resentments that have erupted between newcomers and longtime European residents. It’s fraught, and the violence lurking beneath the surface is palpable. . . . A timely . . . look at the rise of bigotry and the ways racial and ethnic tensions play out in one French community and family.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“Writing with the same poetic precision, artistry, and soulful receptivity as Gretel Ehrlich and Barry Lopez, with the added impact of his rigorous scientist-in-the-field expertise, Glassley is spellbinding as he chronicles his exhilarating adventures.”

Booklist (starred review)

( link)

“Straddles the line effortlessly between poetic and scientific. . . . Glassley’s ability to weave science into a compelling narrative is impressive. His propensity for beautiful prose that boils Greenland down into strikingly visceral snapshots is camera-like. What really pushes A Wilder Time into the upper echelons of nature books is its higher-reaching aims, using this location and journey to explore time, self, and the human relationship to nature.”

Glassworks Magazine

( link)

“Mesmerizing. . . . [Glassley] is a thoroughly accessible guide whose wonder at the landscape that surrounds him is infectious.”

Washington Independent Review of Books

( link)

“The dramatic, austere west coast of Greenland is the setting of A Wilder Time. . . . This engaging book’s more rigorously science-oriented epilogue, including some earth-shattering detail on [a] singed-hair rock that Glassley found, is a treat for geology buffs.”

Pasatiempo

( link)

“Glassley eloquently evokes a place where land feathers into Arctic sea, ice floes glide by on mirror-smooth tongues of clear, frigid water and silence reigns. . . . This story offers perspectives on deep time to boggle minds. . . . Glassley’s vivid impressions of East Greenland attempt what few scientist-writers try: to explore beyond the comfort zone of his field.”

Nature

( link)

“Amazing. A Wilder Time is a book for those who love nature and have that longing desire to learn the unknown, all hidden along the walls of the fjords of Greenland.”

North of Oxford

( link)

“Restrained, powerful. . . . The novel captures the complexity of relationships with great subtlety. . . . Bononno has translated the original French into striking, flowing prose.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“[DeSanders’] Texan bona fides are on ample display in this charming yet heart-wrenching debut about a single tumultuous, pivotal year in the life of a young girl. . . . This is not a romanticized version of childhood, though the conclusion is pitch-perfect. This is a girl discovering cause and effect, exploring boundaries, feeling for the shape of her life.”

Lone Star Literary Life

( link)

“Gorgeously written, fiercely observed. . . . A debut that’s clearly the work of a master writer.”

Big Other

( link)

“Emotionally incisive. . . . Based on a true scandal involving a French author and intellectual, Kramer’s haunting story of this disintegrating family is a timely reflection on the anti-immigrant feelings expressed in France and many other countries, including the U.S.”

Booklist

( link)

“Transport[s] readers across the world and deep into the past, while suggesting a way forward into the future. For budding naturalists, armchair geologists, and anyone who loves a good expedition, this is an ideal read.”

Bookish

( link)

“Builds a case for the necessity of wild places, both as respite from the noise and clutter of modern life and for their inherent values.”

Anchorage Daily News

( link)

“The novel haunts on all levels. . . . Once read, this story is not forgotten.”

Washington Independent Review of Books

( link)

“So thoroughly does Lock set the mood that it is impossible to tell which words of Thoreau, Emerson, and Hawthorne are ones actually spoken or ones created by Lock. Though these men pondered the great questions of their age (and our own), the insertion of Samuel into the story, forces a more practical rendering of their great ideals. . . . A Fugitive in Walden Woods does not shrink from the difficult questions of our time, including racism. It succeeds in its goal of nudging us to become deeper thinkers.”

Shelf-employed

( link)

“In this global, political and social climate, the central ideological topic of [Autopsy of a Father] feels extremely urgent. . . . Throughout, Kramer’s prose is taut and delicately observant.”

Full Stop

( link)

“Thoreau’s time in Walden Woods comes to life. . . . The real beauty of books like A Fugitive in Walden Woods can be best expressed in a quote Samuel Long recalls . . . : ‘Reading is our recompense for having only one life to live.’ Norman Lock has given his readers the chance to live a different life than the one they know best.”

Book Chase

( link)

“Glassley ponders the nature of perception and the human mind, describes the dramatic physical features of Greenland’s makeup and recounts the thrilling adventures of his extended visits there.”

Scientific American

( link)

“Kramer’s novel examines bigotry in the intimate space of family, allowing for a powerfully close look at societal ills.”

World Literature Today

( link)

“A richly literary account. . . . Anchored by deep reflection and scientific knowledge, A Wilder Time is a portrait of an ancient, nearly untrammeled world that holds the secrets of our planet’s deepest past, even as it accelerates into our rapidly changing future. The book bears the literary, scientific, philosophic, and poetic qualities of a nature-writing classic, the rarest mixture of beauty and scholarship, told with the deftest touch.”

John Burroughs Medal judges’ citation

( link)

“This sui generis volume displays the author’s polymathic talents at their exhilarating best. Not content with his role as critic, autobiographist, analysand, Freud scholar, Bauhaus curator, textual sleuth, and reflective Talmudist, Weber infuses familiar territory with freshness and vitality. His journey starts at Signorelli’s Orvieto and Freud’s legendary moment of forgetting. Via Breuer, Solnit, Sartre, Klee, Zweig, Raphael, Titian, as well as his personal inamoratas, we are granted new visions from the art and psychoanalytic worlds. Breathless but still upright, the reader understands better what it means to be a child, a parent, and a living, desiring, failing, dying, struggling, and ultimately triumphant human.”

Jeremy Holmes, author of John Bowlby and Attachment Theory and The Therapeutic Imagination

“Beautifully written, with heartbreaking tenderness and brutal savagery. . . . This period in history is given a new perspective that speaks as clearly to that time as it does to ours.”

Books for Years

( link)

“A deeply insightful book that will force the reader to question race, social standing, and what it means to be truly free.”

Historical Novels Review

( link)

“Lock has embarked on a fascinating intellectual and artistic endeavor: engaging key American writers from the 19th century through a series of speculative historical novels. . . . In his latest installment, the author examines the life and work of Henry David Thoreau. . . . There is no sermonizing here, just thought-provoking juxtapositions and conversations. Ultimately, what emerges is a unique and affectionate homage.”

Library Journal

( link)

“Norman Lock’s American Novels series engages creatively with nineteenth-century literary classics. In the fourth novel in the series, A Fugitive in Walden Woods, a runaway slave encounters Henry David Thoreau and his transcendentalist circle and ponders the meaning of physical and ideological freedom. . . . Having an ex-slave as narrator opens an unusual window into what seems like familiar history. At the same time, Lock’s is a fitting homage to Thoreau.”

Foreword Reviews

( link)

“This is an ingenious and fascinating reading of Freud’s response to Signorelli’s frescoes at Orvieto. It is also a meditation on Jewish identity, and on masculinity, memory, and the power of the image. It is filled with intelligence, wit, and clear-eyed analysis not only of the paintings themselves, but how we respond to them in all their startling sexuality and invigorating beauty.”

Colm Tóibín, author of Brooklyn and Nora Webster

Freud’s Trip to Orvieto is at once profound and wonderfully diverse, and as gripping as any detective story. Nicholas Fox Weber mixes psychoanalysis, art history, and the personal with an intricacy and spiritedness that Freud himself would have admired.”

John Banville, author of The Sea and The Blue Guitar

“Powerful . . . both in keeping with the work of some of the literary figures invoked in its pages and in terms of larger questions of race and privilege in America. Precisely structured and abounding with memorable characters, this novel invokes the past while feeling decidedly relevant to contemporary issues and debates.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“Is [Jerzy Kosinski] really who and what he claims to be? . . . Author Jerome Charyn, who revealed the inner lives of iconic Americans in his previous novels, The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson and I Am Abraham, uncovers the hidden layers of an enigmatic personality.”

Bloomington Public Library (Bloomington, IL)

( link)

“Gripping. . . . Charyn will expertly guide you through the shadowy life of this most enigmatic of artists in this imaginative and provocative novel.”

Historical Novels Review

( link)

“Demonstrates Lock’s uncanny ability to inhabit historical figures and meticulously capture the vernacular of the time like a transcendentalist ventriloquist. . . . The text interweaves dialogue known to be spoken or written by Thoreau, Emerson, and Hawthorne with that made up by Lock and attributed to these giants of American literature. Lock’s remarkable achievement is that the reader cannot tell the difference. The real power of the story, however, comes from Samuel, who more than holds his own among these geniuses. His experiences of brutality offer profound insights that sharpen our understanding of American history.”

Booklist (starred review)

( link)

“Unflinching, penetrative, and bravely earnest. . . . With melodic prose that marvelously captures [the narrator’s] searing insights and rich observations, Lock’s imaginative novel is a stunning meditation on idealism and the cost of humanity.”

Publishers Weekly (starred and boxed review)

( link)

A Fugitive in the Walden Woods is one of four in Lock’s highly imaginative American Novels series. . . . Feeling, as I did, that I had stepped into the 1840s reading Lock’s take on Thoreau and an imaginary freedman, I bet I would also enjoy traveling back in time via the others in this distinguished series.”

LitLovers

( link)

“Stunning photographs transport us to a previously unseen world. . . . [They] also invoke within us a new set of emotions as individual as each of its viewers. What a pleasure.”

William H. Frey II, PhD, founder and senior research director of HealthPartners Neurosciences and coauthor of Crying: The Mystery of Tears (from the foreword)

“A fast-paced, minimalist exploration of one of 20th century’s most elusive literary figures.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“Reveals the existence of a multitude of territories inside of us.”

Palais de Tokyo curator Rebecca Lamarche-Vadel

“Norman Lock has done his homework about Henry David Thoreau and slavery, capturing the essence of both in his sublime novel.”

Counterpunch

( link)

“Beautiful.”

Good Men Project

( link)

“Lock’s novels all use a classic work of American literature as a leaping-off point. . . . His newest leverages Henry David Thoreau’s Walden in the story of Sam Long, an escaped slave who makes his way to New England in the 1840s, where he falls in with a group of abolitionist intellectuals, Thoreau among them. Long captures the distinct personalities of these famous thinkers with uncanny ease, and never loses sight of the gulf that yawns between Long and the people who supposedly regard him as an equal.”

B&N Reads

( link)

“An extraordinary take on an otherwise mundane human response.”

Medical Daily

( link)

“Charyn peels back the layers of myth and artifice built up by chameleon-like Polish-American novelist Jerzy Kosinski. . . . [His] clever novel underscores the sense that Kosinski was a man impossible to nail down, given to wild changes in personality and appearance depending on his own wealth, desires, and mood. Through triangulating voices and stories, Charyn manages to get close to the truth, and does so with beautiful, spare prose.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Lock’s writing is smooth and precise, braiding the worldly and the spiritual together in a lucid, elegant balance. . . . The principal characters are brimming with desires, doubts, and hypocrisies, and are capable of generosity, small-mindedness, genius, and naïveté. They feel at once sharply captured and mysterious—like ordinary mortals who were capable of changing the world.”

Colorado Review

( link)

“A seminal study that is as informed and informative as it is thoughtful and thought-provoking.”

Midwest Book Review

( link)

“Timely in the sense we should have already been talking about it, but thank God someone is talking about it now; McWhorter tackles the idea that African American Vernacular is grammatically incorrect. Decades of associating Black English with error has fed into our nation’s history of racism and vice versa. It is imperative, especially in today’s political landscape that we tackle our hidden prejudice and examine what makes it so. Easy to read in an evening; McWhorter explains not only the grammatical aspects of AAV, but examines cultural backgrounds and the political landscape of race as well. Do yourself a favor, read this book, then take a hard look in the mirror. I know I will.”

Atticus Solomon, Literati Bookstore (Ann Arbor, MI)

“Perfect for amateur linguists looking for a new angle on current discussions of diversity. John McWhorter doesn’t get too technical as he discusses the mechanics of AAVE, but draws attention to the subtle aspects of the dialect.”

Sarah Rettger, Porter Square Books (Cambridge, MA)

“This witty, art-savvy project meanders in all manner of delightful directions.”

Foreword Reviews

( link)

“With an amalgam of relevant history, stunning art, and deft psychology, Weber brings new insights on the life and work of a cultural dynamo.”

Library Journal (starred review)

( link)

“[McWhorter] presents a broader, reframed argument with the sociocultural context necessary [for Black English] to be accepted more broadly. . . . . I was hooked on this book at the dedication: saying of his daughter, ‘I hope she will read this as soon as she is old enough to take it in, to make sure she never for a second thinks black people’s speech is full of mistakes.’”

James McNutt, Darien Library (Darien, CT)

( link)

“[Weber] captivates the reader with this wonderful psychological mystery. . . . Sometimes a molehill is just a molehill, but the process of making it into a mountain is both enthralling and illuminating in Weber’s hands.”

Winnipeg Free Press

( link)

“[McWhorter] explains tricky grammatical and linguistic concepts with humor and energy, making this a fun and informative read.”

Kathleen, University City Public Library (University City, MO)

( link)

“[Weber’s] vivid analysis brings faraway frescoes and lesser-known paintings into vigorous reality, and his idea that Freud suppressed Signorelli’s name because of his reaction to the work’s homoeroticism makes perfect sense when you explore the paintings with him.”

Washington Independent Review of Books

( link)

“John McWhorter does an excellent job making the case for Black English as a fully fledged dialect of English. He also does an excellent job of presenting the linguistic arguments in a way that is easy to digest.”

Nathaniel Hattrick, Liberty Bay Books (Poulsbo, WA)

“With deep sincerity and accessibility, McWhorter addresses why Black English is a dialect and should be treated as a valid way of speaking in the US. This book is so smart and thoughtful.”

Danni Green, Books Are Magic (Brooklyn, NY)

( link)

“A moving depiction of the micro and macro aspects of our emotional lives, and a beautiful means of integrating the often separate realms of science and art.”

Refinery29

( link)

“McWhorter examines not only the vexed past [of Black English], but also the dynamic and difficult present of this vibrant force in cultures around the world.”

Rakestraw Books (from SF Gate)

( link)

“The rise and fall of novelist Jerzy Kosinski (1933-1991) emerges in an offbeat way . . . through Charyn’s resourceful imagination and always-colorful, punchy, provocative prose.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

( link)

“Bursts with intellectual energy, with moral urgency, and with human feeling. . . . [A Fugitive in Walden Woods] achieves the alchemy of good fiction through which philosophy takes on all the flaws and ennoblements of real, embodied life.”

Millions

( link)

“In Talking Back, Talking Black, John McWhorter, the maestro at communicating linguistics to the public, succeeds in helping the reader to ‘actually hear Black English in a new way,’ while hipping linguists to some features of this vibrant variety they might not have considered before.”

John R. Rickford, former president of the Linguistic Society of America and coauthor of Spoken Soul: The Story of Black English 

“A scholarly, in-depth analysis of Black English. . . . Fascinating.”

Midwest Book Review

( link)

“A poignant memoir of Weber’s childhood, a revealing portrait of his intellectual development and a incisive study on masculinity and Judaism. . . . [Freud’s Trip to Orvieto] pulls together a series of elegant portraits, freely combining art history with memoir and psychoanalysis. . . . It strikes one as truthful, clear and revealing.”

Art Newspaper

( link)

“Linguistics fans will be enthralled by McWhorter’s fascinating and logically presented study.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“Well suited for those who have an interest in black studies, education, history, language, or cultural studies.”

Library Journal

( link)

“A dramatic and compelling biographical narrative.”

Biography

“Daringly imaginative and profoundly insightful.”

Booklist (starred review)

( link)

“Portraying the traumatic psychological aftershock not of war but of slavery provides a convincing and complex narrative of new hardships faced by escaped slave Samuel Long in Norman Lock’s bold and enlightening novel A Fugitive in Walden Woods. It’s an important novel that creates a vivid social context for the masterpieces of such writers as Thoreau, Emerson, and Hawthorne and also offers valuable insights about our current conscious and unconscious racism.”

Sena Jeter Naslund, author of Ahab’s Wife and The Fountain of St. James Court; or, Portrait of the Artist as an Old Woman

“Deftly written. . . . Very highly recommended.”

Midwest Book Review

( link)

“Charyn presents a mighty Kosinski in a few dimensions. . . . Perhaps there is even no true Jerzy but merely a myth of many sizes, and one, as Charyn’s novel demonstrates a half-century after the publication of The Painted Bird, we keep on recreating to our mind’s delight.”

Confrontation

“For Charyn, Kosinski is that larger-than-life enigmatic Citizen Kane. . . . What Charyn’s novel can do, with its brilliant satirical bite, is compel readers to learn more about Jerzy Kosinski, one of the great writers of the 20th century. . . . It’s not a simple story, as Charyn’s novel attests. Truth is stranger than fiction and fiction seeks a greater truth.”

Comics Grinder

( link)

“[Sleeping Mask] features characters exploring their circumstances, expectations, and regrets and ruminating on artistry, literature, and mere existence. . . . LaSalle’s dozen multifaceted tales challenge the reader to look beyond a linear narrative, as characters are propelled toward an unraveling, bewildering void.”

Booklist

“[Charyn] matches his faultless ear with a correspondingly artful imagination. . . . Jerzy is where the juju of The Big Apple meets the consummate probing skepticism of native New Yorkers.”

CultureVulture

( link)

“Engaging. . . . LaSalle, a literary descendent of Borges and Nabokov, writes with the inventiveness of his predecessors.”

Library Journal

“Stylistically daring. . . . An entertaining, assured sampling from an endlessly inventive writer.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“Looking at [Fisher’s] photographs feels like staring out a plane window at the passing landscape below.”

Studio 360

( link)

A Fugitive in Walden Woods manages that special magic of making Thoreau’s time in Walden Woods seem fresh and surprising and necessary right now. Norman Lock tells the story of Samuel Long, an escaped slave who encounters Thoreau, with insight and some welcome humor. This is a patient and perceptive novel, a pleasure to read even as it grapples with issues that affect the United States to this day.”

Victor LaValle, author of The Ballad of Black Tom and The Changeling

“[An] unusual meditation on sex, death, art, and Jewishness. . . . Weber weaves in musings on his own sexual and religious experiences, creating a freewheeling psychoanalytic document whose approach would surely delight the doctor, even if its conclusions might surprise him.”

New Yorker

( link)

“Haunting and evocative. . . . LaSalle’s prose is lyrical, at times rhapsodic, and his characters memorable.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

( link)

“A vibrant separation of an African-American vernacular tradition from the thickets of contemporary racial debate.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“Drawing on research, popular culture, and his own expertise as a linguist and black American, McWhorter conveys the roots and richness of the dialect that has come out of the experiences of black Americans. . . . [Talking Back, Talking Black] is an engaging look at the English language as spoken by many black Americans as well as the long history of stereotyping that has prevented an objective analysis of a rich language tradition.”

Booklist

( link)

“McWhorter considers complex issues and leaves the reader with a more clear understanding of language and the implicit assumptions surrounding it. . . . In this time of great anxiety and injustice, [Talking Back, Talking Black] provides insight into a cultural issue that has long been written off and snubbed by many. And as such, his book is proving itself to be about so much more than just language.”

MARY Journal

( link)

“A fascinating exploration—and celebration—of Black English in America.”

Tablet magazine’s Unorthodox podcast

( link)

“A stark, engrossing novel about the rise and fall of celebrated author Jerzy Kozinski whose life was deeply affected by World War II, the Holocaust, the Soviet Union, literary awards, fame and by the film, Being There, that he wrote and that starred Peter Sellers.”

Stay Thirsty Magazine

( link)

“LaSalle’s narrative voice hypnotizes, and his enticingly evasive way of concluding each story leaves a dreamlike impression. The twelve stories in Sleeping Mask are nuanced tales of enduring subjects: desire, despair, the arts, and war.”

Missouri Review

( link)

Talking Back, Talking Black is [McWhorter’s] case for the acceptance of black English as a legitimate American dialect. . . . He ably and enthusiastically breaks down the mechanics.”

New York Times Book Review

“Addresses a studious urge to understand more closely the liquid expression of human emotion.”

GUP Magazine

“Hilarious and provocative. . . . Charyn edges towards the truth of this chameleon character in prose that is beautiful and spare.”

Jewish Renaissance

( link)

“Brilliantly fascinating, weirdly original.”

Evening Standard

( link)

“A fascinating world in miniature. . . . An excellent study in self-examination through art.”

PhotoBook Journal

( link)

“As full of surprises as Jerzy Kosinski was himself. . . . The book whets the reader’s appetite to learn even more about a man who is simultaneously reviled and respected.”

Jewish Book Council

( link)