“These spectacular sentences chart a thrilling investigation into pain, language, and Lisa Olstein’s own exile from what Woolf called ‘the army of the upright.’ On a search path through art, science, poetry, and prime-time television, Olstein aims her knife-bright compassion at the very thing we’re all running from. Pain Studies is a masterpiece.”

Leni Zumas, author of The Listeners and Red Clocks

“A strange, delightful, weird little book!”

Mark Haber, Brazos Bookstore (Houston, TX)

“[A] thoughtful, meditative exploration of humanity’s place in the world.”

WBUR The ARTery

( link)

“Stellar. . . . The powerful impact of this slim, exquisite novel reveal[s] the wisdom of the natural world.”

WOSU All Things Considered

( link)

“There’s a transcendence in Krivak’s prose.”

Addison Independent

“Draws you in immediately.”

Virginian-Pilot

( link)

“Defies categorizing. . . . Immense in its truths.”

Harvard Press

( link)

“Lisa Olstein’s remarkable Pain Studies is a book built of brain and nerve and blood and heart, about what it means to live with pain. Irreverent and astute, synthesizing the personal and the historical, popular culture and poetry and visual art, Pain Studies will change how you think about living with a body in our beautiful and doomed world.”

Elizabeth McCracken, author of Thunderstruck and Bowlaway

“A lyrical fable for fans of soft apocalypse. . . . You’ll find yourself wanting to read sentences aloud for the full affect.”

The Sound

( link)

“Transfixing. . . . This historically authentic novel raises potent questions about sexuality during an unsettling era in American history past and is another impressive entry in Lock’s dissection of America’s past.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“I had a blast reading this book!”

Caitlin Luce Baker, Island Books (Mercer Island, WA)

( link)

“A beautiful, gripping, thought-provoking exploration of human rewilding and nature’s dominion.”

Winnipeg Free Press

( link)

“Lisa Olstein’s luminous meditation on pain winds around a beautifully curated series of artifacts. Bits of poetry, ancient medicine, brain science, television episodes, excerpts from the trial of Joan of Arc, and works of art support the spiderweb on which her insights hang like condensed mist. A fascinating, totally seductive read!”

Eula Biss, author of Notes from No Man’s Land: American Essays and On Immunity: An Inoculation

“[A] tender apocalyptic fable . . . endowed with such fullness of meaning that you have to assign this short, touching book its own category: the post-apocalypse utopia.”

Wall Street Journal

“This spectacular work will delight and awe readers with Lock’s magisterial wordsmithing.”

Library Journal (starred review)

( link)

“A penetrating parable of suburban family life. . . . Millás tells a compelling story of human connection in a way that is sometimes crude but also darkly funny, insightful and ultimately surprising.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“Spectacularly bizarre. . . . A Kafkaesque story about transformation and our collective human desire to connect with one another.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“Riveting. . . . One of those novels that will linger in the mind and memory of the reader long after the book itself is finished.”

Midwest Book Review

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“Arresting, exquisite. . . . The Bear is more than a parable for our times, it’s a call to listen to the world around us before it’s too late.”

Observer

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“Fascinating yet sad. . . . Utterly compelling to read.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“[A] moving novel. . . . O’Connor’s bleak, powerful story serves as an affecting homage to a girl whose community failed to protect her.”

Publishers Weekly

“Beautiful. . . . So loving and vivid that you can feel the lake water and smell the sea. . . . A perfect fable for the age of solastalgia.”

Slate

( link)

“O’Connor’s poignant tale addresses numerous relevant and timely issues, from cultural anxiety to female empowerment or the lack thereof, and the painful and often tragic condition of eating disorders.”

Booklist

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“A moving, masterful story. . . . O’Connor’s recreation of this world and its people is haunted and haunting, with marvelous poetry and human sorrow resonating in every line.”

Historical Novels Review

( link)

“Lyrical. . . . Gorgeous. . . . Krivak’s serene and contemplative novel invites us to consider a vision of time as circular, of existence as grand and eternal.”

Washington Post

( link)

Feast Day of the Cannibals is the first of [Lock’s American Novels] to explore the lives of 19th-century men who felt a sexual attraction to each other. . . . [His] recreation of a past time and place is impressive, but his signal achievement in this novel is the voice of its narrator, Shelby Ross. . . . Lock does not merely imitate 19th-century prose; he makes it his own, with verbal flourishes worthy of Melville.”

Gay & Lesbian Review

( link)

“A compelling stew of comedy, philosophy, and even tragedy, From the Shadows maintains a light touch, even as sinister undertones bubble underneath.”

Foreword Reviews

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“The real miracle lies in the capacity of Sarah’s singular, dark fate to illuminate the socioeconomic, religious, scientific, philosophic, and political cultures and conflicts of [the] time. . . . A transcendent historical novel.”

Foreword Reviews (starred review)

( link)

“O’Connor takes the story of Sarah Jacob, one of history’s most noteworthy fasting girls, and turns this 150-year-old tale into a freshly poignant commentary on family dynamics and the treatment of women.”

Miracle Monocle magazine

( link)

“This fable about seeking harmony with nature by Earth’s last human inhabitants—a father and daughter—has lessons of love, loss, family and survival.”

Massachusetts Book Awards jury citation

( link)

The Bear is a luminous book of a standard one sees perhaps once every generation. . . . As [it] tenderly breaks your heart, piece by piece, it fills that void with something powerful and timeless. Written with precision, clarity, and gentle fluidity, The Bear reminds us that all we need to know awaits us in the wild.”

Pete Takeda, Mountain Book Competition Jury citation

( link)

“At the center of Varley O’Connor’s novel The Welsh Fasting Girl is a single, horrifying question: what happens when an idea becomes more important than a person—and what happens when that person is a girl? . . . A searing critique. . . . It is one of the only places I have been reassured, in literature or otherwise, that when our morbid wonder towards eating problems ends, our understanding of the individual’s pain might begin.”

Barrelhouse Magazine

( link)

“Part surreal comedy, part dark parable, Millás’s wild work brings readers face to face with the mundane facets of middle-class suburban life. . . . A page-turner of the strangest order, Millás’s debut stuns and entrances. It’s impossible to put down.”

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

( link)

“A fable of survival in a consumerist society.”

Seattle Review of Books

( link)

“An entertainingly presented look at social isolation and dependency.”

Complete Review

“I became enthralled as the mystery of a young girl’s death by starvation unfolds, revealing layers of secrets about family life amid religious and cultural conflicts. Varley O’Connor is a splendid storyteller.”

Lynne Sharon Schwartz, author of Disturbances in the Field and Two-Part Inventions

“Incredibly strange, truly bizarre—one of the most original stories. . . . Impossible to put down.”

Shelf Unbound

( link)

“Equal parts psychotic, suspenseful, and tenderly funny. . . . This novel forever changed how I feel when I’m home alone.”

TorNightfire.com

( link)

“Hilarious and unique.”

Crime Reads

( link)

“The compact, surreal story . . . is uproarious and unnerving in equal measure, and is far too riveting to put down.”

Thrillist

( link)

“A seductive narrator, brisk dialogue, and a unique claustrophobic setting contribute to a distinctive blend of Kafka’s surrealism and Pirandello’s absurdism. . . . A quick, riveting read.”

World Literature Today

( link)

“Spectacularly surreal and cerebral. . . . [From the Shadows] carves a labyrinthine path through a mind withstanding both physical and mental confinements, and the language, rife with darkness and comedy, traces the fine walls of worlds both real and imagined with Kafkaesque soliloquy.”

Asymptote Journal

( link)

“In this richly textured and compelling novel, Varley O’Connor proves to us that human desire is never simple and that our noblest wishes sometimes provoke our darkest deeds.”

Mary Morris, author of The Jazz Palace and Gateway to the Moon

“Begins as entertaining slapstick, subtly metamorphoses into fable. . . . As [the narrator’s] vivid imaginary world fuses with reality this deceptively ethereal novel advances toward a dark and startling finale.”

Wall Street Journal

( link)

“Varley O’Connor’s beautiful and brilliant novel takes us deep into the mysteries of virtue’s conspiracy with evil and the human spirit’s war against itself. With spot-on historical detail and scintillating language, the novel fascinates and moves us, and uses the story of a nineteenth-century Welsh farm girl to deliver cogent insights into contemporary issues regarding gender and family.”

Stephen O’Connor, author of Orphan Trains and Thomas Jefferson Dreams of Sally Hemings

“It’s a strange and winsome feeling I have, reading Tacoma Stories, the blue sensation that Richard Wiley has made me homesick for a place I’ve never been, mourning the loss of friends I never had, in a life where each and every one of us is loved, however imperfectly. Think Sherwood Anderson inhabiting Raymond Carver’s Northwest and you’ll have a clear picture of Wiley’s accomplishment.”

Bob Shacochis, author of Easy in the Islands and The Woman Who Lost Her Soul

“Richard Wiley is one of our best writers. These stories satisfy in the way that brilliant short fiction always satisfies; one feels as if one has absorbed the expansive vision and drama of a novel. Read slowly, and I bet you’ll want to read again.”

Richard Bausch, author of Peace and Living in the Weather of the World

Murmur by Will Eaves is a really extraordinary book, unlike any other. He’s in a class of his own.”

Max Porter, author of Grief Is the Thing with Feathers

“Will Eaves’s Murmur is masterful—compassionate, principled, and moving. It is deeply wise, with the aching loneliness of both human indignity and dignity, despair and courage.”

Anne Michaels, author of Fugitive Pieces and All We Saw

“Vivid and as varied as you can get. . . . Amusing, chilling, and sometimes downright bizarre, readers of short story collections with a unified theme will enjoy this.”

Barbarian Librarian

( link)

“Tender and funny, Murmur takes the tragic story of Turing’s life and punishment and ingeniously transforms it into something glittering, subversive, and even triumphant. Eaves has built a magnificently challenging memorial to one of the great twentieth-century martyrs.”

Patrick Gale, author of Rough Music and A Place Called Winter

“Very highly recommended. . . . While the narratives are all strong individual stories, presented together as a whole they create a masterful collection and reflection on life over the decades.”

She Treads Softly

( link)

Murmur is a profound meditation on what machine consciousness might mean, the implications of AI, where it will all lead. It’s one of the big stories of our time, though no one else has treated it with such depth and originality.”

Peter Blegvad, author of The Book of Leviathan

“It takes a certain literary brilliance to convey the conscious and unconscious mind of one of history’s greatest intellects. Will Eaves eloquently probes the boundaries between dreams, perception, and reality, prompting the reader to examine the recesses of their own labyrinthine psyche. A seamless dialogue between art and science, and fact and fiction.”

Heather Berlin, Ph.D., M.P.H., neuroscientist and host of Science Goes to the Movies and Startalk All-Stars

“An extraordinarily entertaining read from cover to cover.”

Midwest Book Review

( link)

“There is science, there is art and there is Jungian symbolism. . . . For all its challenges, Murmur is also beautiful [in its] willingness to embrace opacity, its portrayal of the labyrinthine paths along which thought proceeds, and its exhilarating ambition to test Alec’s belief that ‘[a] mind can’t prove or step outside itself’ by inviting us to step out from ours, and into his.”

New Statesman

( link)

Murmur is boldly different from anything else written about Turing.”

Times

( link)

“Eaves has achieved one of the pinnacles of novelistic endeavour: he has given deep thought to human experience, and in doing so brought to life the ‘self-conscious wonder’ of thought itself.”

Times Literary Supplement

( link)

“Wiley shines in the short form, absorbing the reader in slices of one town and its inhabitants while rendering them universal.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“Exceptionally poised and elegant. . . . Murmur is a poignant meditation on the irrepressible complexity of human nature and sexuality, and a powerful indictment of the cowardice and groupthink that sustain state-sanctioned barbarism. It also poses timely questions about the digital world Turing’s pioneering work helped bring about.”

Irish Times

( link)

“Compelling. . . . The genius of [Tacoma Stories] is that the relationships between characters and their backstories add depth to each entry, but the individual tales are still strong enough to stand on their own.”

Foreword Reviews

( link)

“This linked set of seriocomic stories that hopscotches across a half-century . . . emphasizes unlikely transformations over time—and, as the title suggests, the role of place in those transformations. And though Wiley juggles plenty of characters, he has a light touch that’s fitting for a book rooted in the free-wheeling ’60s.”

Kirkus Reviews

“Captures beautifully the pith and precision of Turing’s own prose. . . . One of Eaves’s great accomplishments is to make the aesthetic questions raised by [Murmur] as significant as the ethical ones.”

Financial Times

( link)

The Flip lucidly lays out a way of thinking about the enfolding of mind and reality that is at once empirically scientific and at the same time consistent with all we know from some of our most sophisticated philosophical and spiritual traditions. Jeffrey J. Kripal provides a practical guide to a deeper and more effective understanding of ourselves and our world. Read this book if you want to actively contribute to the development of a worldview that will be of extraordinary benefit to humankind and our planet.”

David E. Presti, author of Foundational Concepts in Neuroscience and Mind Beyond Brain

“An extraordinary exploration of dreams, consciousness, science and the future.”

New Scientist

( link)

“Wiley’s antic, wrenching collection of 14 interlocking stories reveals the subtle connections among a dozen characters whose unpredictable lives evolve through the decades in the title city. . . . [It] provides a tentatively affirmative answer to the question raised by a fictional version of the daughter of Orson Welles and Rita Hayworth: ‘Do you think a town can act as a hedge against the unabated loneliness of the human heart?’”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Tacoma is underrepresented in literature, so this book presents a tremendous opportunity.”

Seattle Review of Books

( link)

“Read[s] well as a literary version of a concept album with a unified theme.”

Tacoma Weekly

( link)

“Jeffrey J. Kripal is one of the most important voices pushing the academy to broaden its perspective beyond the secular: to take seriously the idea that reality is more complex. He is slowly winning the argument and changing the terrain of debate without making an argument for any one religion. This is a remarkable achievement. The Flip is worthy of a wide readership.”

T. M. Luhrmann, author of When God Talks Back and Our Most Troubling Madness

“In The Flip, Jeffrey J. Kripal reflects deeply on non-ordinary experiences that transform people’s way of understanding themselves and the world. Kripal uses an imaginative transdisciplinary method that weaves together contemporary thought in ecology, quantum physics, evolutionary biology, philosophy of mind, comparative mysticism, and first-person experiential accounts. The result is an eminently readable manifesto for the role of the humanities in integrating emergent thought in these many domains. Prophetically, the larger goal is nothing less than transforming humanity toward a greater wisdom community that can move beyond many of our most intractable problems and dysfunctions.”

Bradley Lewis, author of Narrative Psychiatry: How Stories Can Shape Clinical Practice and Depression: Integrating Science, Humanities, and Culture

“A marvelous mixture of humor and contemplative nostalgia, Tacoma Stories shows us that cities are more than just a collection of buildings, landmarks and roads. They’re a delicate web of lives and stories, each one connected in ways we might never expect.”

Puget Sound Trail

( link)

“[Wiley] is able to articulate a familiar and endearing world of Tacoma, humanizing the city to a reader who may not have even heard of the ‘City of Destiny.’”

Tacoma Ledger

( link)

“One reads in the hope of delight. And that’s what [Tacoma Stories] provides. The linked stories that make up the collection are deeply pleasureful reads.”

Mark Jacobs, Peace Corps Worldwide

( link)

“Wiley’s characters are far from absurdist; it might even be accurate to say that they are mid-to-late 20th-century approximations of Chaucer’s pilgrims . . . all starting out together from Tacoma on a journey through adulthood. . . . Across the pilgrimage of their lives, we see a slow burnishing of their hopes and dreams, but also of their failures. Tacoma itself, like Dublin in James Joyce’s Dubliners, also asserts its own force of character. . . . Wiley has finally given his city the loving touch it deserves.”

Ann Neelon, Peace Corps Worldwide

( link)

“Makes the baffling notions of quantum mechanics and neuroscience digestible. In this respect, The Flip is similar to The Lives of a Cell: Notes of a Biology Watcher by Lewis Thomas. . . . The research incorporated into the book is well thought out, and ranges from writer Philip K. Dick to mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan. Kripal even discusses how Joni Mitchell came up with the idea that ‘we are stardust’ ten years before Carl Sagan popularized it. . . . The Flip did open my mind to the fact that there are leading experts in both the field of science and religion (Kripal himself) who are pushing toward unification and the extinction of out-dated knowledge.”

NewPages

( link)

“Offers plenty of points to ponder.”

Kirkus Reviews

“[The Flip] will ignite conversations about the limits of science and the potential for dramatic shifts in perspective.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

Murmur is a restrained and elegant exploration of cause and effect, and the meaning of life and love.”

BBC judges’ citation

( link)

Murmur is a fully achieved literary experiment, digging deep into all the dimensions of human consciousness.”

Goldsmiths Prize judge’s citation

( link)

“Eaves’ playful, fiercely intelligent interpretation of aspects of the life of a character who closely resembles the brilliant, multifaceted Alan Turing is a dreamlike wonder of memory and consciousness. Its ways are mysterious, its effect deepens with every reading.”

Republic of Consciousness Prize judge Catherine Taylor in the Guardian

( link)

“I can’t say enough great things about Eduardo Halfon’s novels. His newest, Mourning, translated by the incredible Lisa Dillman & Daniel Hahn is no exception.”

Mark Haber, Brazos Bookstore (Houston, TX)

( link)

“Wonderfully rich. . . . Reading this book is an embodied experience; it is yoga for the mind. The Flip is an important book that deserves a broad readership both inside and outside the academy.”

Reading Religion

( link)

“Halfon’s magnificent prose and abundant storytelling prowess work in tandem to create an irresistible style. . . . As with the ghostly, evocative trails of smoke that have adorned each of Halfon’s English edition covers, Mourning is possessed by traces of the ethereal, the mysterious, and the shadowy. . . . [It] functions wonderfully as the third volume in Halfon’s bittersweet, doleful inquest into family folklore, remembrance, and indelible generational anguish.”

Jeremy Garber, Powell’s Books (Portland, OR)

( link)

“[Murmur will] grip your mind in the very first pages, break your heart halfway through, and in the end, strangely, unexpectedly, restore your faith in human beings and their endless capacity for resilience.”

Wellcome Book Prize chair of judges Elif Shafak in the Guardian

( link)

“A warmly vivid account of various science-minded people who have experienced the ‘Flip’. . . . Passionate and often funny.”

Guardian

( link)

“Halfon’s writing hits a virtual ecstasy.”

Jonas Mekas, director of As I Was Moving Ahead Occasionally I Saw Brief Glimpses of Beauty at Electric Literature

( link)

“[The Flip] synthesizes some of the most recent speculations about the nature of the cosmos and the human, proposing a renewed mutual engagement of the sciences and humanities. . . . With its visionary notions and revisionary potential, The Flip merits a wide readership, across the academy and outside of it.”

Houston Chronicle

( link)

“Scrupulous, humane . . . [Murmur] is as bracingly intelligent as it is brave. . . . [Eaves] knows that Turing’s theories of consciousness have implications for fiction, and that fiction can operate at the frontiers of what we know about the workings of our minds.”

Guardian

( link)

“One of the most provocative new books of the year, and, for me, mindblowing.”

Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma and How to Change Your Mind

( link)

“A deftly crafted read from beginning to end. . . . Extraordinary and unreservedly recommended.”

Midwest Book Review

( link)

“Complex and erudite. . . . [Murmur] bears reading twice.”

Library Journal

( link)

“[Halfon] clarif[ies] in fluid, accessible language that however slippery, memory is essential to who we are.”

Library Journal

( link)

“Exquisite. . . . This novel will submerge readers in contemplation and dazzling prose as it captures the essence of mind and matter.”

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

( link)

“Halfon spins a bewitching tale. . . . Careful, arresting prose brings everything together in a moving, evocative story of the narrator’s bloodline.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“An unforgettable exploration of one family’s fluid, collective memory.”

Booklist

( link)

“Gripping. . . . A wildly inventive and moving exploration of the human mind.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

( link)

“With his slender but deceptively weighty books, which are at once breezy and melancholic, bemused and bitter, [Halfon] opens up worlds to readers in return.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

( link)

“Beautiful and hallucinatory. . . . From extreme isolation and suffering springs a vision of universal connectedness.”

Wall Street Journal

“Part Jorge Luis Borges, part Sholom Aleichem. . . . Halfon is the sort of traveler who admits he knows nothing, yet finds enlightenment everywhere. Mourning emits some little illumination of human nature on every page.”

Rumpus

( link)

“Evocative. . . . Mourning is a mystery, a drama and a fictional memoir. It is a book that manages to be both melancholy in tone yet triumphant in spirit.”

Jewish Boston

( link)

“Powerful, gorgeous. . . . Halfon gives an unforgettable, haunting voice to lesser-known populations of the Jewish diaspora, including Latin American and Lebanese Jews. Mourning shows how the weaving together of diasporic families across cultures and places creates ripples through generations.”

Jewish Book Council

( link)

“A careful, precise story that explores the many facets of loss and healing.”

World Literature Today

( link)

“Brimming with subtle mystery, inquisitiveness, oddity, coincidence, and melancholy. . . . A highly entertaining tragedy, a fascinating page-turner.”

Asymptote Journal

( link)

“Elegant and meditative.”

Words Without Borders

( link)

“Halfon is a master.”

Smithsonian magazine

( link)

“A feat of literary acrobatics.”

New York Review of Books

( link)

“Weissmann’s project is to show how science and culture aren’t as distant as often thought, and the best of the essays are wonderfully stimulating and exciting in how they make this point. . . . Admirers will be captivated anew.”

Publishers Weekly

“Expertly hopscotch[es] across all sorts of topics. . . . Weissmann’s humanist, sometimes sardonic, voice binds together disparate strands to show how all human endeavor is linked. . . . Weissmann clearly sees how history obfuscates the work of women, people of color and immigrants, and tries to alter that. . . . Anyone with an interest in American scientific or literary history will enjoy this collection.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“Highly accessible, entertaining. . . . Every current theme, including buzz about free radicals and the 2014 Ebola outbreak, is tempered with a historical anecdote. Here, too, are cautionary concerns about henna tattoos, reminders to beware of ‘alternative science,’ and lots of humor. Weissmann’s science writing is juicy and conversational.”

Booklist

( link)

“Essays that brim with knowledge and bubble with attitude.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“A rich layering of past, present, science, and literature to present diverse takes on the issue at hand. . . . Weissmann not only endeavors to connect the realms of literature and medicine, but also to create community among readers in light of class, race, religion, and age.”

Glassworks Magazine

( link)

“This beautifully written novel provides a new perspective on the 19th century and it’s charming to imagine the character of Emily Dickinson as Norman Lock has written her.”

Amanda Holmes Duffy, Politics and Prose Bookstore (Washington, DC)

( link)

“Amnesty International UK endorses Alpha because it provides insight into the realities of migration and the desperate search for a better life.”

Nicky Parker, Publisher of Amnesty International UK

“[A] consistently excellent series. . . . Lock has an impressive ear for the musicality of language, and his characteristic lush prose brings vitality and poetic authenticity to the dialogue.”

Booklist

( link)

“The lively passages of Emily’s letters are so evocative of her poetry that it becomes easy to see why Robert finds her so captivating. The book also expands and deepens themes of moral hypocrisy around racism and slavery. . . . Lyrically written but unafraid of the ugliness of the time, Lock’s thought-provoking series continues to impress.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“The emotion of Barroux’s simple art and layouts pulled me along on Alpha’s journey. This book stands out, along with Don Brown’s The Unwanted, from other graphic novels about the current refugee crisis.”

Gene Ambaum, co-creator of Unshelved and the Library Comic

( link)

“Lock deftly tells a visceral story of belief and conflict, with abundant moments of tragedy and transcendence along the way.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“In [Charyn’s] enchanting writing, the glory is in the details.”

Comics Grinder

( link)

“A searing tale of our time. . . . Once you read this deeply troubling book, passing by, looking away, is no longer an option.”

Michael Morpurgo, author of War Horse and An Eagle in the Snow

“Perceptive and contemplative. . . . Bring[s] the 1840–60s to life with shimmering prose.”

Library Journal (starred review)

“[Charyn] is a writer of great passion, lyric and empathy. . . . These essays flow from the page with realism and from an author who knows the truth.”

North of Oxford

( link)

“A valuable collection, both an effective primer for readers new to Charyn’s work and an intriguing read for those already familiar, showing off his skills as a memoirist and a culture writer in equal measure.”

Foreword Reviews

( link)

“Takes us to the human soul of the migrant crisis and the exploitation they face.”

Daily Record

( link)

“Groundbreaking. . . . Stunning text.”

Guardian

( link)

“Deeply personal. . . . Readers will delight in encountering Charyn’s New York City. . . . From his ruminations on seeing classic studio-era films during his South Bronx childhood in the 1940s and ’50s to an account of a day spent with Mayor Ed Koch in the mid-’80s, Charyn’s prose enchants. . . . Longtime fans and those new to Charyn’s work alike will enjoy this distinctive glimpse into one author’s influences.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Artistically presented. . . . Interesting in technique and storytelling. Lock quotes Emily Dickinson: She dealt her pretty words like Blades —. Lock does much the same in this novel.”

North of Oxford

( link)

“Lively essays. . . . A very personal view of the past artfully brought to vivid life.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“Powerful. . . . Charyn composes an autobiography of essays, sharing lessons learned from a lifetime of love for leading ladies, literature and language.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“A powerful graphic novel that is also suitable for young adults. . . . [Alpha’s] first-person account of his ‘adventures’ devolves into a living nightmare as the journey drags on with a constantly changing group of companions. The prose is simple, and the story is told without embellishment. . . . The illustrations set a mood of haste and simplicity, appearing to be marker sketches—almost as if they could have been made on the journey. . . . It will be difficult to look upon the plight of any refugees without reflecting on Alpha’s journey.”

Shelf-employed

( link)

“[Alpha’s] tale of smugglers, fake passports, wasted bribes, and desperate migration is happening today. . . . Great graphic novels, like great novels, can spread the gift of empathy.”

Illustration Concentration

( link)

“[A] unique work in comics. . . . The fate of the immigrant is in crisis across the globe, including in the United States of America. Books like Alpha help to educate the public and help to build toward a safer and more merciful world.”

Comics Grinder

( link)

“Accessible and brimming with erudition. . . . Charyn writes with passionate precision about writers, films and filmmakers, about New York’s marginalized classes, and all manner of cultural icons. . . . [He] deftly blends the stories of his own life with the stories of those whose ordeals, failures, and victories hold special meaning for him as symptomatic of the American experience. . . . Wherever he takes us, Charyn’s mind is always agile, and his prose is stunningly electric.”

Jewish Book Council

( link)

“[Alpha] breaks from the traditional dynamic graphic novel format of panels and speech bubbles. Rather, Bessora’s expressive words serve as captions to the half-page illustrations. . . . Subtle elements of collage are incorporated; small photographs, often of young children, peek into the fore- or background of certain scenes. . . . This stark, poetic story personalizes immigration. For all libraries.”

School Library Journal (starred review)

( link)

“With his customary linguistic verve and pulsing imagination, Jerome Charyn serves up here some of the tastiest essay writing available. He knows and loves New York past and present, and he draws on a lifetime of raucous experience and dedicated reading for a rich, heady, satisfying brew.”

Phillip Lopate, editor of The Art of the Personal Essay and author of A Mother’s Tale

“Intense, atmospheric, and suspenseful.”

Neshama Franklin, Marin County Free Library (San Rafael, CA)

( link)

The Wreckage of Eden is a huge and dark fresco of an army chaplain’s journey through very difficult and troubling periods of American history (normally denied us in school), and all the while this fine angle of approach is like a slow cinematic zoom and track onto an elusive Emily Dickinson ensconced in her Amherst.”

The Brothers Quay, award-winning film directors

“A migrant’s harrowing journey to follow his wife and son to Paris from Côte d’Ivoire unfolds in an illustrated narrative that . . . movingly depicts Alpha’s challenging passage.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Lays forth the many forms of devastation suffered by lives adrift while introducing memorable characters.”

Library Journal

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“A compelling tale. . . . Heartbreaking and timely.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“The plight of the refugee is brought to brutally vivid life in this visual diary. . . . By homing in on the experience of one symbolic individual, Alpha humanizes the too-often faceless tragedy.”

Booklist

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“To those who say that ‘illegal’ migrants are line-jumpers, [Alpha] . . . is a vivid retort.”

The Common

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“The text is blunt, matter of fact, but also painfully deep and poetic. . . . [The illustrations] effortlessly complement the text. . . . The washes of greys and blacks stain the page much like tears. This powerful book is an important one. It needs to be in the hands of every citizen of the world, so they can, for a moment, peer into the plight of others and, perhaps, reshape how refugees are viewed.”

Literature, Arts and Medicine Database

( link)

Alpha is the story of everyone who bravely risks all they know for the hope of a better future. . . . Honest and direct rather than inspiring and romantic, Alpha gives a name and face to the multitudes in refugee camps all over the world. An important story for all of us to know.”

New York Journal of Books

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“Gives readers a deep sense of what it takes to survive and the terrible toll war and loneliness extracts not only on those who go to war but also those waiting at home.”

North of Oxford

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“As political debates and news reports on immigration proliferate, rare is empathetic reportage of the actual experiences and desperation these migrants face. . . . Alpha is that compassionate link. . . . ‘You can’t wash away the dust,’ Bessora writes. ‘It’s not just in the streets—the dust has settled in people’s hearts.’ Alpha: Abidjan to Paris draws a refugee with empathy and compassion, in an effort to lift the dust in people’s hearts.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“Intimately told. . . . Masterfully composed. While immigration may be a contentious political issue, Alpha reminds us of the people behind the headlines: those who inhabit the smugglers’ compartments in rickety trucks, pay for fake passports, and trust their lives to boats that are barely seaworthy, all in search of a better future for themselves and their families.”

Foreword Reviews

( link)

Wolf Season takes contemporary war-and-mil-writing preoccupation with dogs to its fantastical-yet-logical extension. . . . Rin and Naema are compellingly drawn, as are Rin’s daughter Juney and Naema’s son Tariq and the three wolves, Gray, Silver, and Ebony. Most striking, however, are two male characters, Louis Martin and Todd Wycombe, both veterans struggling to be men worthy of respect.”

Time Now

( link)

“[Benedict is] at the top of her game here. . . . The wolves indeed have the last word in Wolf Season, much as do the dogs in David Wroblewski’s The Story of Edgar Sawtelle. Benedict’s final chapter is appropriately titled ‘Howl,’ which brings to mind Allen Ginsberg and his poem of the same name—with its line ‘monstrous bombs!’ in canto II. Yet perhaps Ginsberg’s line from one of his other poems, ‘America,’ best sums it all up: ‘America when will we end the human war?’ Helen Benedict’s Wolf Season certainly gives us ample reasons to consider doing so.”

Woven Tale Press

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“A powerful picture of the limits of compassion and the knee-jerk nature of emotions: prejudice directed against immigrants and the fear of wolves.”

BookBrowse

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“Compelling. . . . Benedict doesn’t shy away from her characters’ very different faults as they grasp for courage and resilience during their dark times.”

Booklist

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“Gripping. . . . A low level of dread builds slowly, drawing readers toward the inevitable climactic clash, though Benedict’s memorable and complicated characterization is the true highlight.”

Publishers Weekly

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“Glassley and his fellow geologists went on six expeditions to one of the world’s most remote lands to study ancient evidence related to plate tectonics. In evocative prose, he describes their research and the startling beauty of Greenland, and speculates on the nature of perception and the wonder inspired by wilderness.”

San Francisco Chronicle, “Top Shelf” Recommendation from Bay Area independent bookstore Face in a Book (El Dorado Hills, CA)

( link)

“Affecting. . . . The ‘very long reach of war’ transcends generations.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“Unflinching. . . . In a book that deserves the widest attention, Benedict ‘follows the war home,’ engaging readers with an insightful story right up until the gut-wrenching conclusion.”

Library Journal (starred review)

“The best way to make moral choices is to understand the experiences of others. And fictional literature like Wolf Season can take us to a heightened level of understanding about the experience of war.”

Michigan Daily

( link)

“To say Wolf Season is merely a portrait of the war at home . . . would be misleading. Benedict’s ambitions are far more sweeping, for the fears and prejudices that motivate her characters mirror the dilemmas in the ongoing war on terror.”

American Book Review

( link)

“Like other great art, Wolf Season . . . show[s] us how deeply moved we can be by lives and experiences that bear little resemblance to our own.”

In the Fray

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“Cuts right into the current tenor of American culture, with characters who are haunted by the violence of war.”

Neworld Review

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“Extraordinary insight and sensitivity . . . offering a unique and multi-dimensional perspective on women as veterans today in the U.S.”

HuffPost

( link)

“The novel moves between striking passages that speak war’s truth and heartfelt stories about how women—and mothers—experience war and its aftermath. While there are male soldiers in Wolf Season, women’s experience is at the forefront. . . . Told with honesty and empathy, Wolf Season is a contemporary tale about how the war always comes home.”

Washington Independent Review of Books

( link)

“The international refugee crisis is given a singular expression in this affecting work.”

PEN America

( link)

Wolf Season is honest about suffering, trauma, and the difficulty of healing after war. . . . [The novel] reminds us that we do what’s best for our family—our pack—even if it’s the thing that hurts the most.”

Chronogram

( link)

“This Walden-esque reflection on wilderness and humanity’s relationship to it will have you shivering along with Glassley and his colleagues in their tents, and wondering at the awe-inspiring age of the rocks they study and what it teaches us about the ancient history of our planet.”

San Francisco Chronicle, “Top Shelf” Recommendation from Bay Area independent bookstore Napa Bookmine (Napa, CA)

( link)

“A fascinating gem of a book about a geological exploration of Greenland that leads to a scientific breakthrough.”

San Francisco Chronicle, “Top Shelf” Recommendation from Bay Area independent bookstore Copperfield’s Books (San Rafael, CA)

( link)

“We’re a bit swoony-eyed about A Wilder Time. . . . Glassley joins the ranks of naturalist writers who make talking about rocks and lichens sexy with this witty and engrossing memoir of time spent wandering about on Greenland. . . . His enthusiasm is infectious and his wonder at this wild place is inspiring.”

NW Book Lovers “Face Out” selection by A Good Book Café (Sumner, WA)

( link)

“As geologists, we may be rational scientists, but expeditions to remote places touch something deep in us that moves us to also be poets. Glassley has turned his experiences in Greenland into searingly beautiful descriptions of a wild landscape and the ways in which that landscape moves and changes him. Every sentence is evocative, connoting curiosity, awe, and respect in equal measure. A Wilder Time is a paean on the importance of wilderness to the human spirit and a saddening reminder of what we lose when we divorce ourselves from contact with wild places. Glassley’s voice will stay with me the way the works of Loren Eiseley, Edward Abbey, Rachel Carson, and Aldo Leopold have stayed with me over the decades.”

Jane Selverstone, professor emerita in the Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences at the University of New Mexico

“In this extraordinary narrative, Glassley, a geologist, describes his intimate relationship with Greenland’s ancient rocks in such a fashion that the reader who knows nothing about geology is hooked; that reader feels like he’s not only been transported to the rockribbed coast of West Greenland, but is also bent down and studying its rocks right along with Glassley. At the same time, the book reminds us of the degree to which climate change is damaging the planet. . . . Urgently recommended!”

Lawrence Millman, author of Last Places and At the End of the World

“While conducting research probing deep time and the origin of continents, Glassley discovered a further source of fascination: the Arctic wilderness of Greenland. In A Wilder Time, he shares his encounters with unvarnished nature still free—for now—from the corruptions and constructs of human settlement. With openness, clarity, and a keen eye for detail, he weaves adventure, research, astonished awe, and thoughtful reflection into an absorbing account of his sojourns.”

Martha Hickman Hild, author of Geology of Newfoundland: Field Guide

“Glassley’s A Wilder Time is a wonderful mix of science and poetry. It delves into the kind of spiritual effect that wilderness has on those privileged to work in it and how it changes the way we experience and understand our surroundings and our lives. The science, including the geological controversy at the heart of the book, is lucidly explained, and readers will be absorbed by the story Glassley tells as well as his many vividly described encounters with nature. Next time someone asks me why I am a geologist, I will just hand them this book.”

William L. Griffin, professor of geology at Macquarie University

“[Benedict] has such a compassionate and yet clear-eyed understanding of the myriad costs of war. Blew my mind.”

Ayelet Waldman, author of Daughter’s Keeper and Love and Treasure

( link)

“Brilliant and unforgettable, DeSanders’s autobiographical fiction takes us deep within the human psyche and the human heart, and delivers us to a uniquely strange and ambivalent grace.”

Rick Whitaker, author of Assuming the Position and An Honest Ghost

“While conveying the geological hypotheses, techniques of data collection, and adventures of his expeditions to Greenland with his two Danish colleagues, Glassley also brings startling sensory precision to his descriptions. The velvety feeling of moss, the taste of lichen, the alternating rhythms of terror and fluidity in schools of fish through which a predatory sculpin cruises—such experiences bring what might have seemed a stark world of rock and ice alive. This delicacy of perception is the vehicle through which not only the scientific quest but also the profound mystery of our living Earth saturates this memorable book.”

John Elder, coeditor of The Norton Book of Nature Writing and author of Picking Up the Flute

“No one writes with more authority or cool-eyed compassion about the experience of women in war both on and off the battlefield than Helen Benedict. In Wolf Season, she shows us the complicated ways in which the lives of those who serve and those who don’t intertwine and how—regardless of whether you are a soldier, the family of a soldier, or a refugee—the war follows you and your children for generations. Wolf Season is more than a novel for our times; it should be required reading.”

Elissa Schappell, author of Use Me and Blueprints for Building Better Girls

“Benedict masterfully summons characters who don’t share her biography: she’s a civilian getting sympathetically, and accurately, inside the minds of soldiers; a Westerner intimately addressing the concerns of Middle Eastern refugees; someone with the vivid power of sight imagining the equally vivid experience of the sightless; an adult bringing child characters to life.”

Jay Baron Nicorvo, author of The Standard Grand, at Literary Hub

( link)

“Rollicking, tilted, and transporting. As the young narrator tries to manage her fraying family—war-wounded father, suffering mother, misbehaving relatives galore—DeSanders takes us deeper, always with such tenderness and beautiful observation into the ways we shape a narrative that keeps us whole.”

Victoria Redel, author of Loverboy and Before Everything

“The Iraq War. Disability. Women on and off the battlefield. AND WOLVES! . . . [An] extraordinary new novel.”

Caroline Leavitt, author of Pictures of You and Cruel Beautiful World, at Carolineleavittville

( link)

“Glassley exhibits an uncanny ability to put us in the midst of Greenland’s vast silence, where he takes us deep into the planet’s soul. It is an important and well-told adventure that opens us to life’s grand expanse and begs us to follow in spite of the brevity of our existence.”

John Francis, author of Planetwalker and The Ragged Edge of Silence

“Fierce and vivid and full of hope, this story of trauma and resilience, of love and family, of mutual aid and solidarity in the aftermath of a brutal war is nothing short of magic. Helen Benedict is the voice of an American conscience that has all too often been silenced. To read these pages is to be transported to a world beyond hype and propaganda to see the human cost of war up close. This is not a novel that allows you to walk away unchanged.”

Cara Hoffman, author of Be Safe I Love You and Running

“DeSanders’s genius lies in her ability to capture the intimate interiority of a very particular childhood while at the same time interrogating larger questions of class, race, and religion. Hap and Hazard and the End of the World is a gorgeous, profoundly original novel.”

Dawn Raffel, author of Carrying the Body and The Secret Life of Objects

“A novel of love, loss, and survival, Wolf Season delves into the complexities and murk of the after-war with blazing clarity. You will come to treasure these characters for their strengths and foibles alike. Helen Benedict has delivered yet again, and contemporary war literature is much the better for it.”

Matt Gallagher, author of Kaboom: Embracing the Suck in a Savage Little War and Youngblood

“Bessora’s prose and Barroux’s illustrations join to illuminate the heart-wrenching journey of a West African refugee. . . . The reader is drawn into the refugee’s experience and shares his agonizing odyssey via the graphic novel’s blunt yet poetic language.”

World Literature Today

( link)

“[Benedict] has emerged as one of our most thoughtful and provocative writers of war literature.”

David Abrams, author of Fobbit and Brave Deeds, at the Quivering Pen

( link)

“Diane DeSanders writes the sort of prose that gives that telltale tingle down the spine, prose that paints vivid pictures in the mind and presents an entire, unique world: the Lone Star State, the state of America, the state of childhood, the state of a traumatized father, and the state of being a girl, of being wonderfully and truly alive.”

Sheila Kohler, author of Becoming Jane Eyre and Once We Were Sisters

“Very few people have spent as much time as William E. Glassley in such deep wilderness. So it would behoove us to pay attention even if he had not brought back such a fascinating, lovely, and useful set of observations. This is a remarkable book.”

Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature and Oil and Honey

“Very highly recommended. . . . A Wilder Time is a celebration of wilderness, written in poetic prose that can be appreciated by anyone who enjoys good nature writing. It is also a call to save the wilderness areas we have left.”

She Treads Softly

( link)

A Wilder Time is nature writing at its informative and inspirational best and unreservedly recommended.”

Midwest Book Review

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“A poetic, metaphysical and philosophical treatise on the wildness of life on earth. . . . [Glassley’s] enthusiasm for geology is palpable. His love of the wild is tangible, and his way with words beautiful.”

Shelf Awareness

( link)

“Thoughtful. . . . Evincing humility in the midst of the great ‘unshaped wild,’ Glassley exudes a palpable and infectious sense of wonder.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Delectable. . . . Autopsy of a Father provides commentary on France’s societal attitudes on race and immigration. This will lead to hours of discussion in itself. I highly recommend this captivating novel.”

Underrated Reads

( link)

“Poetic, enthusiastic. . . . Combining the strengths of travel writing and lyrical memoir, Glassley translates his own ‘incandescent experience of place’ into a conservation message: ‘We must share and celebrate the wild so that it might be saved.’”

Foreword Reviews (starred review)

( link)

“Impressive. . . . This deftly crafted and inherently fascinating book is unreservedly recommended.”

Midwest Book Review

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“[A] deftly translated . . . deftly crafted and inherently fascinating read by an impressively talented novelist. . . . Unreservedly recommended.”

Midwest Book Review

( link)

“A weighty book full of conversations that are still topical.”

IndiePicks Magazine

“DeSanders achieves a heartbreaking, lyrical, and laser-focused evocation of a child’s perception of the mysteries of the adult world; the perfectly rendered setting is 1940s Dallas, just when its harsh rural beauties were becoming sanitized into suburban conformity.”

Historical Novels Review

“[Kramer’s body of work is] precise and sumptuous . . . a song of emotion, but with a great lucidity about the humanity of simple people.”

Swiss Federal Office of Culture, Swiss Grand Prize for Literature citation

( link)

“Incisive, insightful, and discomfiting. . . . Autopsy of a Father belongs on the shelf next to works by authors like Nadine Gordimer and Magda Szabo. Its psychological investigation of a crumbling intelligentsia and a family fallen from grace is absolutely riveting. Robert Bononno’s translation does great justice to this quiet and unsettling thriller.”

Foreword Reviews

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“Smart and subtle. . . . [A] moving example of a family trying to make life work.”

Publishers Weekly

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“Perfectly captures life near Dallas after World War II, as seen through the eyes of a child. . . . Funny and nostalgic and occasionally unsettling, this child’s view of her own small world also provides a picture of the wider world at that time.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“[A] captivating debut novel. . . . Drawing on her own family letters, diaries, and oral histories, newcomer DeSanders captures the voice and thoughts of a young girl observing her frayed family while questioning the mysterious larger world. A brave and honest work that won’t disappoint.”

Library Journal

“A time capsule of American awakening.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“Paints a vivid picture of childhood in postwar America, replete with all of the joys and sorrows that are part of growing up.”

Booklist

( link)

“Profound and moving. . . . A superb tool for a better understanding of the natural world and why real science matters.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

( link)

“[Autopsy of a Father] delves into anti-immigrant sentiment and the resentments that have erupted between newcomers and longtime European residents. It’s fraught, and the violence lurking beneath the surface is palpable. . . . A timely . . . look at the rise of bigotry and the ways racial and ethnic tensions play out in one French community and family.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“Writing with the same poetic precision, artistry, and soulful receptivity as Gretel Ehrlich and Barry Lopez, with the added impact of his rigorous scientist-in-the-field expertise, Glassley is spellbinding as he chronicles his exhilarating adventures.”

Booklist (starred review)

( link)

“Amazing. A Wilder Time is a book for those who love nature and have that longing desire to learn the unknown, all hidden along the walls of the fjords of Greenland.”

North of Oxford

( link)

“Restrained, powerful. . . . The novel captures the complexity of relationships with great subtlety. . . . Bononno has translated the original French into striking, flowing prose.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“[DeSanders’] Texan bona fides are on ample display in this charming yet heart-wrenching debut about a single tumultuous, pivotal year in the life of a young girl. . . . This is not a romanticized version of childhood, though the conclusion is pitch-perfect. This is a girl discovering cause and effect, exploring boundaries, feeling for the shape of her life.”

Lone Star Literary Life

( link)

“Gorgeously written, fiercely observed. . . . A debut that’s clearly the work of a master writer.”

Big Other

( link)

“Emotionally incisive. . . . Based on a true scandal involving a French author and intellectual, Kramer’s haunting story of this disintegrating family is a timely reflection on the anti-immigrant feelings expressed in France and many other countries, including the U.S.”

Booklist

( link)

“Transport[s] readers across the world and deep into the past, while suggesting a way forward into the future. For budding naturalists, armchair geologists, and anyone who loves a good expedition, this is an ideal read.”

Bookish

“Mesmerizing. . . . [Glassley] is a thoroughly accessible guide whose wonder at the landscape that surrounds him is infectious.”

Washington Independent Review of Books

( link)

“Engaging. . . . A treat for geology buffs.”

Pasatiempo

( link)

“Builds a case for the necessity of wild places, both as respite from the noise and clutter of modern life and for their inherent values.”

Anchorage Daily News

( link)

“The novel haunts on all levels. . . . Once read, this story is not forgotten.”

Washington Independent Review of Books

( link)

“So thoroughly does Lock set the mood that it is impossible to tell which words of Thoreau, Emerson, and Hawthorne are ones actually spoken or ones created by Lock. Though these men pondered the great questions of their age (and our own), the insertion of Samuel into the story, forces a more practical rendering of their great ideals. . . . A Fugitive in Walden Woods does not shrink from the difficult questions of our time, including racism. It succeeds in its goal of nudging us to become deeper thinkers.”

Shelf-employed

( link)

“Straddles the line effortlessly between poetic and scientific. . . . What really pushes A Wilder Time into the upper echelons of nature books is its higher-reaching aims, using this location and journey to explore time, self, and the human relationship to nature.”

Glassworks Magazine

( link)

“Glassley eloquently evokes a place where land feathers into Arctic sea, ice floes glide by on mirror-smooth tongues of clear, frigid water and silence reigns. . . . This story offers perspectives on deep time to boggle minds. . . . Glassley’s vivid impressions of East Greenland attempt what few scientist-writers try: to explore beyond the comfort zone of his field.”

Nature

( link)

“In this global, political and social climate, the central ideological topic of [Autopsy of a Father] feels extremely urgent. . . . Throughout, Kramer’s prose is taut and delicately observant.”

Full Stop

( link)

“Thoreau’s time in Walden Woods comes to life. . . . The real beauty of books like A Fugitive in Walden Woods can be best expressed in a quote Samuel Long recalls . . . : ‘Reading is our recompense for having only one life to live.’ Norman Lock has given his readers the chance to live a different life than the one they know best.”

Book Chase

( link)

“Glassley ponders the nature of perception and the human mind, describes the dramatic physical features of Greenland’s makeup and recounts the thrilling adventures of his extended visits there.”

Scientific American

“Kramer’s novel examines bigotry in the intimate space of family, allowing for a powerfully close look at societal ills.”

World Literature Today

( link)

“A richly literary account. . . . Anchored by deep reflection and scientific knowledge, A Wilder Time is a portrait of an ancient, nearly untrammeled world that holds the secrets of our planet’s deepest past, even as it accelerates into our rapidly changing future. The book bears the literary, scientific, philosophic, and poetic qualities of a nature-writing classic, the rarest mixture of beauty and scholarship, told with the deftest touch.”

John Burroughs Medal judges’ citation

( link)

“This sui generis volume displays the author’s polymathic talents at their exhilarating best. Not content with his role as critic, autobiographist, analysand, Freud scholar, Bauhaus curator, textual sleuth, and reflective Talmudist, Weber infuses familiar territory with freshness and vitality. His journey starts at Signorelli’s Orvieto and Freud’s legendary moment of forgetting. Via Breuer, Solnit, Sartre, Klee, Zweig, Raphael, Titian, as well as his personal inamoratas, we are granted new visions from the art and psychoanalytic worlds. Breathless but still upright, the reader understands better what it means to be a child, a parent, and a living, desiring, failing, dying, struggling, and ultimately triumphant human.”

Jeremy Holmes, author of John Bowlby and Attachment Theory and The Therapeutic Imagination

“Beautifully written, with heartbreaking tenderness and brutal savagery. . . . This period in history is given a new perspective that speaks as clearly to that time as it does to ours.”

Books for Years

( link)

“A deeply insightful book that will force the reader to question race, social standing, and what it means to be truly free.”

Historical Novels Review

( link)

“Lock has embarked on a fascinating intellectual and artistic endeavor: engaging key American writers from the 19th century through a series of speculative historical novels. . . . In his latest installment, the author examines the life and work of Henry David Thoreau. . . . There is no sermonizing here, just thought-provoking juxtapositions and conversations. Ultimately, what emerges is a unique and affectionate homage.”

Library Journal

“Norman Lock’s American Novels series engages creatively with nineteenth-century literary classics. In the fourth novel in the series, A Fugitive in Walden Woods, a runaway slave encounters Henry David Thoreau and his transcendentalist circle and ponders the meaning of physical and ideological freedom. . . . Having an ex-slave as narrator opens an unusual window into what seems like familiar history. At the same time, Lock’s is a fitting homage to Thoreau.”

Foreword Reviews

( link)

“This is an ingenious and fascinating reading of Freud’s response to Signorelli’s frescoes at Orvieto. It is also a meditation on Jewish identity, and on masculinity, memory, and the power of the image. It is filled with intelligence, wit, and clear-eyed analysis not only of the paintings themselves, but how we respond to them in all their startling sexuality and invigorating beauty.”

Colm Tóibín, author of Brooklyn and Nora Webster

Freud’s Trip to Orvieto is at once profound and wonderfully diverse, and as gripping as any detective story. Nicholas Fox Weber mixes psychoanalysis, art history, and the personal with an intricacy and spiritedness that Freud himself would have admired.”

John Banville, author of The Sea and The Blue Guitar

“Powerful . . . both in keeping with the work of some of the literary figures invoked in its pages and in terms of larger questions of race and privilege in America. Precisely structured and abounding with memorable characters, this novel invokes the past while feeling decidedly relevant to contemporary issues and debates.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“Is [Jerzy Kosinski] really who and what he claims to be? . . . Author Jerome Charyn, who revealed the inner lives of iconic Americans in his previous novels, The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson and I Am Abraham, uncovers the hidden layers of an enigmatic personality.”

Bloomington Public Library (Bloomington, IL)

( link)

“Gripping. . . . Charyn will expertly guide you through the shadowy life of this most enigmatic of artists in this imaginative and provocative novel.”

Historical Novels Review

( link)

“Demonstrates Lock’s uncanny ability to inhabit historical figures and meticulously capture the vernacular of the time like a transcendentalist ventriloquist. . . . The text interweaves dialogue known to be spoken or written by Thoreau, Emerson, and Hawthorne with that made up by Lock and attributed to these giants of American literature. Lock’s remarkable achievement is that the reader cannot tell the difference. The real power of the story, however, comes from Samuel, who more than holds his own among these geniuses. His experiences of brutality offer profound insights that sharpen our understanding of American history.”

Booklist (starred review)

( link)

“Unflinching, penetrative, and bravely earnest. . . . With melodic prose that marvelously captures [the narrator’s] searing insights and rich observations, Lock’s imaginative novel is a stunning meditation on idealism and the cost of humanity.”

Publishers Weekly (starred and boxed review)

( link)

“Stunning photographs transport us to a previously unseen world. . . . [They] also invoke within us a new set of emotions as individual as each of its viewers. What a pleasure.”

William H. Frey II, PhD, founder and senior research director of HealthPartners Neurosciences and coauthor of Crying: The Mystery of Tears (from the foreword)

“A fast-paced, minimalist exploration of one of 20th century’s most elusive literary figures.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“Reveals the existence of a multitude of territories inside of us.”

Palais de Tokyo curator Rebecca Lamarche-Vadel

“Norman Lock has done his homework about Henry David Thoreau and slavery, capturing the essence of both in his sublime novel.”

Counterpunch

( link)

“Beautiful.”

Good Men Project

( link)

“Lock’s novels all use a classic work of American literature as a leaping-off point. . . . His newest leverages Henry David Thoreau’s Walden in the story of Sam Long, an escaped slave who makes his way to New England in the 1840s, where he falls in with a group of abolitionist intellectuals, Thoreau among them. Long captures the distinct personalities of these famous thinkers with uncanny ease, and never loses sight of the gulf that yawns between Long and the people who supposedly regard him as an equal.”

B&N Reads

( link)

“An extraordinary take on an otherwise mundane human response.”

Medical Daily

( link)

“Charyn peels back the layers of myth and artifice built up by chameleon-like Polish-American novelist Jerzy Kosinski. . . . [His] clever novel underscores the sense that Kosinski was a man impossible to nail down, given to wild changes in personality and appearance depending on his own wealth, desires, and mood. Through triangulating voices and stories, Charyn manages to get close to the truth, and does so with beautiful, spare prose.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Lock’s writing is smooth and precise, braiding the worldly and the spiritual together in a lucid, elegant balance. . . . The principal characters are brimming with desires, doubts, and hypocrisies, and are capable of generosity, small-mindedness, genius, and naïveté. They feel at once sharply captured and mysterious—like ordinary mortals who were capable of changing the world.”

Colorado Review

( link)

“A seminal study that is as informed and informative as it is thoughtful and thought-provoking.”

Midwest Book Review

( link)

“Timely in the sense we should have already been talking about it, but thank God someone is talking about it now; McWhorter tackles the idea that African American Vernacular is grammatically incorrect. Decades of associating Black English with error has fed into our nation’s history of racism and vice versa. It is imperative, especially in today’s political landscape that we tackle our hidden prejudice and examine what makes it so. Easy to read in an evening; McWhorter explains not only the grammatical aspects of AAV, but examines cultural backgrounds and the political landscape of race as well. Do yourself a favor, read this book, then take a hard look in the mirror. I know I will.”

Atticus Solomon, Literati Bookstore (Ann Arbor, MI)

“Perfect for amateur linguists looking for a new angle on current discussions of diversity. John McWhorter doesn’t get too technical as he discusses the mechanics of AAVE, but draws attention to the subtle aspects of the dialect.”

Sarah Rettger, Porter Square Books (Cambridge, MA)

“This witty, art-savvy project meanders in all manner of delightful directions.”

Foreword Reviews

( link)

“With an amalgam of relevant history, stunning art, and deft psychology, Weber brings new insights on the life and work of a cultural dynamo.”

Library Journal (starred review)

( link)

“[McWhorter] presents a broader, reframed argument with the sociocultural context necessary [for Black English] to be accepted more broadly. . . . . I was hooked on this book at the dedication: saying of his daughter, ‘I hope she will read this as soon as she is old enough to take it in, to make sure she never for a second thinks black people’s speech is full of mistakes.’”

James McNutt, Darien Library (Darien, CT)

( link)

“[Weber] captivates the reader with this wonderful psychological mystery. . . . Sometimes a molehill is just a molehill, but the process of making it into a mountain is both enthralling and illuminating in Weber’s hands.”

Winnipeg Free Press

( link)

“[McWhorter] explains tricky grammatical and linguistic concepts with humor and energy, making this a fun and informative read.”

Kathleen, University City Public Library (University City, MO)

( link)

“[Weber’s] vivid analysis brings faraway frescoes and lesser-known paintings into vigorous reality, and his idea that Freud suppressed Signorelli’s name because of his reaction to the work’s homoeroticism makes perfect sense when you explore the paintings with him.”

Washington Independent Review of Books

( link)

“John McWhorter does an excellent job making the case for Black English as a fully fledged dialect of English. He also does an excellent job of presenting the linguistic arguments in a way that is easy to digest.”

Nathaniel Hattrick, Liberty Bay Books (Poulsbo, WA)

“With deep sincerity and accessibility, McWhorter addresses why Black English is a dialect and should be treated as a valid way of speaking in the US. This book is so smart and thoughtful.”

Danni Green, Books Are Magic (Brooklyn, NY)

( link)

“A moving depiction of the micro and macro aspects of our emotional lives, and a beautiful means of integrating the often separate realms of science and art.”

Refinery29

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“McWhorter examines not only the vexed past [of Black English], but also the dynamic and difficult present of this vibrant force in cultures around the world.”

Rakestraw Books (from SF Gate)

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“The rise and fall of novelist Jerzy Kosinski (1933-1991) emerges in an offbeat way . . . through Charyn’s resourceful imagination and always-colorful, punchy, provocative prose.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

( link)

“Bursts with intellectual energy, with moral urgency, and with human feeling. . . . [A Fugitive in Walden Woods] achieves the alchemy of good fiction through which philosophy takes on all the flaws and ennoblements of real, embodied life.”

Millions

( link)

“In Talking Back, Talking Black, John McWhorter, the maestro at communicating linguistics to the public, succeeds in helping the reader to ‘actually hear Black English in a new way,’ while hipping linguists to some features of this vibrant variety they might not have considered before.”

John R. Rickford, former president of the Linguistic Society of America and coauthor of Spoken Soul: The Story of Black English 

“A scholarly, in-depth analysis of Black English. . . . Fascinating.”

Midwest Book Review

( link)

“A poignant memoir of Weber’s childhood, a revealing portrait of his intellectual development and a incisive study on masculinity and Judaism. . . . [Freud’s Trip to Orvieto] pulls together a series of elegant portraits, freely combining art history with memoir and psychoanalysis. . . . It strikes one as truthful, clear and revealing.”

Art Newspaper

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“Linguistics fans will be enthralled by McWhorter’s fascinating and logically presented study.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

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“Well suited for those who have an interest in black studies, education, history, language, or cultural studies.”

Library Journal

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“A dramatic and compelling biographical narrative.”

Biography

“Daringly imaginative and profoundly insightful.”

Booklist (starred review)

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“Portraying the traumatic psychological aftershock not of war but of slavery provides a convincing and complex narrative of new hardships faced by escaped slave Samuel Long in Norman Lock’s bold and enlightening novel A Fugitive in Walden Woods. It’s an important novel that creates a vivid social context for the masterpieces of such writers as Thoreau, Emerson, and Hawthorne and also offers valuable insights about our current conscious and unconscious racism.”

Sena Jeter Naslund, author of Ahab’s Wife and The Fountain of St. James Court; or, Portrait of the Artist as an Old Woman

“Deftly written. . . . Very highly recommended.”

Midwest Book Review

( link)

“Charyn presents a mighty Kosinski in a few dimensions. . . . Perhaps there is even no true Jerzy but merely a myth of many sizes, and one, as Charyn’s novel demonstrates a half-century after the publication of The Painted Bird, we keep on recreating to our mind’s delight.”

Confrontation

“For Charyn, Kosinski is that larger-than-life enigmatic Citizen Kane. . . . What Charyn’s novel can do, with its brilliant satirical bite, is compel readers to learn more about Jerzy Kosinski, one of the great writers of the 20th century. . . . It’s not a simple story, as Charyn’s novel attests. Truth is stranger than fiction and fiction seeks a greater truth.”

Comics Grinder

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“[Sleeping Mask] features characters exploring their circumstances, expectations, and regrets and ruminating on artistry, literature, and mere existence. . . . LaSalle’s dozen multifaceted tales challenge the reader to look beyond a linear narrative, as characters are propelled toward an unraveling, bewildering void.”

Booklist

“[Charyn] matches his faultless ear with a correspondingly artful imagination. . . . Jerzy is where the juju of The Big Apple meets the consummate probing skepticism of native New Yorkers.”

CultureVulture

( link)

“Engaging. . . . LaSalle, a literary descendent of Borges and Nabokov, writes with the inventiveness of his predecessors.”

Library Journal

“Stylistically daring. . . . An entertaining, assured sampling from an endlessly inventive writer.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“Looking at [Fisher’s] photographs feels like staring out a plane window at the passing landscape below.”

Studio 360

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A Fugitive in Walden Woods manages that special magic of making Thoreau’s time in Walden Woods seem fresh and surprising and necessary right now. Norman Lock tells the story of Samuel Long, an escaped slave who encounters Thoreau, with insight and some welcome humor. This is a patient and perceptive novel, a pleasure to read even as it grapples with issues that affect the United States to this day.”

Victor LaValle, author of The Changeling and Lone Women

“[An] unusual meditation on sex, death, art, and Jewishness. . . . Weber weaves in musings on his own sexual and religious experiences, creating a freewheeling psychoanalytic document whose approach would surely delight the doctor, even if its conclusions might surprise him.”

New Yorker

( link)

“Haunting and evocative. . . . LaSalle’s prose is lyrical, at times rhapsodic, and his characters memorable.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

( link)

“A vibrant separation of an African-American vernacular tradition from the thickets of contemporary racial debate.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“Drawing on research, popular culture, and his own expertise as a linguist and black American, McWhorter conveys the roots and richness of the dialect that has come out of the experiences of black Americans. . . . [Talking Back, Talking Black] is an engaging look at the English language as spoken by many black Americans as well as the long history of stereotyping that has prevented an objective analysis of a rich language tradition.”

Booklist

( link)

“McWhorter considers complex issues and leaves the reader with a more clear understanding of language and the implicit assumptions surrounding it. . . . In this time of great anxiety and injustice, [Talking Back, Talking Black] provides insight into a cultural issue that has long been written off and snubbed by many. And as such, his book is proving itself to be about so much more than just language.”

MARY Journal

( link)

“A fascinating exploration—and celebration—of Black English in America.”

Tablet magazine’s Unorthodox podcast

( link)

“A stark, engrossing novel about the rise and fall of celebrated author Jerzy Kozinski whose life was deeply affected by World War II, the Holocaust, the Soviet Union, literary awards, fame and by the film, Being There, that he wrote and that starred Peter Sellers.”

Stay Thirsty Magazine

( link)

“LaSalle’s narrative voice hypnotizes, and his enticingly evasive way of concluding each story leaves a dreamlike impression. The twelve stories in Sleeping Mask are nuanced tales of enduring subjects: desire, despair, the arts, and war.”

Missouri Review

( link)

Talking Back, Talking Black is [McWhorter’s] case for the acceptance of black English as a legitimate American dialect. . . . He ably and enthusiastically breaks down the mechanics.”

New York Times Book Review

“Addresses a studious urge to understand more closely the liquid expression of human emotion.”

GUP Magazine

“Hilarious and provocative. . . . Charyn edges towards the truth of this chameleon character in prose that is beautiful and spare.”

Jewish Renaissance

( link)

“Brilliantly fascinating, weirdly original.”

Evening Standard

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“A fascinating world in miniature. . . . An excellent study in self-examination through art.”

PhotoBook Journal

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“As full of surprises as Jerzy Kosinski was himself. . . . The book whets the reader’s appetite to learn even more about a man who is simultaneously reviled and respected.”

Jewish Book Council

( link)

“Extraordinary stories which, when one begins to savor their prose, plunge one into oceanic depths of language where the mirror of the sea reflects the myth of the self in dreamy distortions that shock one as revelations of truth.”

Dawn

( link)

“In [Talking Back, Talking Black], McWhorter offers an explanation, a defense, and, most heartening, a celebration of the dialect that has become, he argues, an American lingua franca. . . . [He] demonstrates the ‘legitimacy’ of Black English by uncovering its complexity and sophistication, as well as the still unfolding journey that has led to its creation. . . . [His] intelligent breeziness is the source of the book’s considerable charm.”

New Yorker

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“In seeing . . . The Topography of Tears, I am floored by our physical connectedness of the natural world. . . . The photographs in this series are delicate, fragile and quietly complex, not unlike the emotions that come with tears.”

Lenscratch

( link)

“Intriguing. . . . Lively. . . . Perhaps Kosinski lied and dissembled more than was strictly necessary, but as Charyn’s puzzle-box novel demonstrates, it’s hard to argue with the results.”

Toronto Star

( link)

“The sheer strangeness, variety and beauty of [Fisher’s] ‘photomicrographs’ are stunning. . . . The photos also manage to convey a beautifully wide spectrum of human emotion.”

Angelus magazine

( link)

Jerzy is a novel with a light touch that’s still capable of lifting heavy subjects. Charyn knows what he wants to do and knows how to do it. His prose has some of the rapid-fire but carefully controlled energy of Thomas Pynchon’s early novella The Crying of Lot 49. Part of Charyn’s point is to make the real and the imagined sound equally implausible. . . . Charyn’s other point seems much broader: to show that all forms of power are pretty much alike, or at least connected—Hollywood, Capitol Hill, Kensington Palace, the Kremlin. Because Kosinski is a figure who proves (if we still need to learn it) that the craziness of American life may have more in common with the craziness of Russia and Europe than we like to think.”

New York Times Book Review

( link)

“There are elements of Fisher’s images [in The Topography of Tears] that can’t be explained by science, and the great poet Ann Lauterbach also wrote an essay for the book, drawing on work from William Blake and Janis Joplin to define the many meanings of tears. It’s only in the afterword that Fisher reveals the personal inspiration behind the work. . . . In those final pages of text, we’re surprised to remember the ordinariness of the many epic ‘landscapes’ that came before. Suddenly, they don’t seem so alien anymore.”

Feature Shoot

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“A moving attempt to trace the connections between Kosinski’s wartime struggles and postwar fictions.”

New Yorker

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“Incredible. . . . Lingers long in the mind.”

Amateur Photographer magazine

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“Enthralling. . . . Fisher uses the technological tools of science to probe the poetic, immaterial dimensions of a universal human behavior radiating infinite emotional hues.”

Maria Popova, Marginalian

( link)

“[A] delicate, intimate book. . . . In The Topography of Tears photographer Rose-Lynn Fisher shows us a place where language strains to express grief, longing, pride, frustration, joy, the confrontation with something beautiful, the confrontation with an onion.”

Boston Globe

( link)

“This ingenious novel features a charming psychiatric patient possibly inhabited by Robert Louis Stevenson, a Noh mask, Mark Twain cosplay, and many loveable, quirky characters, including some from Tacoma!”

sweet pea Flaherty, King’s Books (Tacoma, WA)

( link)

“I love books that start out with someone making a colossal mistake. This starts with a great one—Dr. Ruby Okada unknowingly falls in love with a man escaping from her psychiatric hospital. The beauty of this slim novel is the way in which the ‘how’ and ‘why’ is all tangled into a quirky puzzle with the ‘so, what happens next?’ I had SO much fun de-tangling.”

Mary Cotton, Newtonville Books (Newton, MA)

( link)

“When you first view Rose-Lynn Fisher’s photographs, you might think you’re looking down at the world from an airplane, at dunes, skyscrapers or shorelines. In fact, you’re looking at her tears. . . . [There’s] poetry in the idea that our emotional terrain bears visual resemblance to the physical world; that our tears can look like the vistas we see out an airplane window. Fisher’s images are the only remaining trace of these places, which exist during a moment of intense feeling—and then vanish.”

NPR

( link)

“Clever. . . . Wiley skillfully balances the psychological explanations for Archie’s strange behavior with the more fanciful notion that he has been possessed by Stevenson’s spirit, one of those ‘metaphysical rovers’ seeking out corporeal forms. It’s an elegant conceit around which to craft a tale about the ambiguities of character.”

Publishers Weekly

“Haunted—in a good way—by the ghost of Robert Louis Stevenson. . . . A romantic comedy with just enough of a philosophical edge.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“If you have any interest in the fight against totalitarian theocracy, then you must read A Road Unforeseen. I found it to be a thorough, well organized primer on Kurdistan, ISIS, and the self governing region known as Rojava. Meredith Tax is a phenomenal researcher, and makes this deeply complicated topic very readable. Still not convinced? THIS IS ABOUT WOMEN FIGHTING AN INSANE DEATH CULT.”

Anje, Third Place Books (Lake Forest Park, WA)

( link)

“An indefatigable political thinker and activist takes us on a forensic journey into the gendering of geopolitical conflict and resistance.”

Beatrix Campbell, author of Diana, Princess of Wales: How Sexual Politics Shook the Monarchy and End of Equality: The Only Way Is Women’s Liberation

“This book lifts the lid on one of the best-kept secrets of our times, the birth of a revolution in the Middle East driven by gender equality and direct democracy. Meredith Tax makes a well-researched, cogent, and passionate case for why we should all get behind this experiment, at once fragile and gutsy, in Rojava, northern Syria, and Turkey.”

Rahila Gupta, author of Provoked and Enslaved

“At last we have a book that tells us what we crave to know each day as we open the newspaper to read about IS, Islamists, shifting alliances, enslaved women, fleeing immigrants, and shocking cruelties. Meredith Tax shows us how the Kurds of Rojava are trying to put in place a system of equality between men and women and take local, democratic control of their lives, which would be remarkable anywhere, let alone in a war zone. As Tax so clearly demonstrates here, putting women at the center of a struggle for freedom changes everything. It’s time to learn about the extraordinary Rojava and the hope it offers that another world is possible.”

Ann Snitow, author of The Feminism of Uncertainty

“We in the West are so unused to thinking of Middle Eastern and Muslim women as liberated, let alone as feminist revolutionaries, that Meredith Tax’s remarkable book, A Road Unforeseen, comes as a welcome correction. By tracing the historical and political evolution of a group of Kurdish feminist guerrillas, Tax shows us what revolution looks like with feminism at its center, even in the midst of the repressive and violent attacks on women and Kurds in Turkey, Iraq, and Syria. This powerful and persuasive book is a must-read for anyone who takes the plight of women seriously.”

Helen Benedict, author of The Lonely Soldier and Sand Queen

“Meredith Tax tells the tangled and amazing history of Kurdish politics—from family feuds to terrorism to radical democracy and feminism—with just the right mixture of admiration and concern.”

Michael Walzer, author of Just and Unjust Wars and The Paradox of Liberation

A Road Unforeseen is essential reading to understand the extraordinary democratic revolution led by the Kurds in Syria. This is compelling history but also a clarion call to the US and the international community to support this fragile project that elevates and celebrates human rights, democracy, and equality for all genders, races, and religions.”

Carne Ross, author of Independent Diplomat and The Leaderless Revolution

“Through a clever use of dissociative identity disorder, [Bob Stevenson] provides an exploration of the workings of the human mind, its pathology, and its machination to make up stories. . . . This novel of identities within identities, selves within selves ends on a note of the unknowns and uncertainties of life. The question of identity and the self prevails as the key matter in the novel, whether based on a figment of a pathological mind or on a membership to a genealogy.”

MedHum Fiction | Daily Dose: Adventures at the Intersection of Medicine and Literature

( link)

“Wiley takes Treasure Island off the dusty shelf of the late 19th century and translates its transgressive pirate allure in daring and illuminating ways for 21st-century readers.”

Peace Corps Worldwide

( link)

“Impressively well researched, written, organized and presented, A Road Unforeseen: Women Fight the Islamic State is a seminal study. . . . Consistently compelling, informed and informative, A Road Unforeseen is very highly recommended.”

Midwest Book Review

( link)

“A witty, roller-coaster ride of uncertain identity set against the gritty certainties of New York City. In compelling, unadorned prose, Richard Wiley gives us a bewitching and ultimately moving tale.”

Caryl Phillips, author of A Distant Shore and The Lost Child

“An important look at an unfolding situation little understood in the West.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Tax approaches the Syrian conflict from a unique perspective as she focuses on the role of Kurdish women combatants. . . . Extensively researched, this is an immensely relevant primer on a complex people whose past and future are critical to the success of peace in their region.”

Booklist

( link)

“Zeroes in on a contemporary example of unanticipated moxie: The successful, if little-known, resistance to Muslim fundamentalism that has developed along the Syrian-Turkish border.”

Lilith

( link)

“Thorough and well-documented. . . . Readers interested in geopolitical issues and history will no doubt be grateful for [Tax’s] lucid explanation of events involving countries like Turkey, Syria, Iraq, and Iran and for illuminating the plight of the Kurdish people in the Middle East.”

New York Journal of Books

“[A Road Unforeseen] is an on-the-fly intervention in an ongoing conflict. It smoothly shows many things at once, and [Tax] does a commendable job in creating a concise and readable account of this tangled situation.”

Toward Freedom

( link)

“We’re fortunate to have the patient, politically astute voice of Meredith Tax [and her] remarkable book to explain the history and meaning of these amazing events.”

Herizons

“A book of revelations about life during wartime in Rojava. . . A Road Unforeseen celebrates those women who are ripping the guts out of ISIS and explains how they came to be at the center of the Kurdish struggle for freedom.”

First of the Month

( link)

“Openly enthusiastic. . . . Traces the development of Rojava’s militant feminism to roots in Turkey’s Kurdish rebel movement.”

Los Angeles Review of Books

( link)

“With her combined expertise on fundamentalism, feminism, and human rights, Tax . . . shows what it means to view aspects of the Middle East through these basic prisms. . . . [A Road Unforeseen] is a welcome addition to the growing literature in English on the Kurds and will be mined for its perspectives and insights for years to come. ‘Any movement for real transformation,’ she insists, ‘must make the demands of women central.’ This superb book will be an essential resource for this question in the years to come.”

ROAR Magazine

( link)

“Exceptional. . . . Not only informative but heart-wrenching. . . . It is the analysis that situates what is otherwise described as a struggle against terrorism or a struggle for national freedom as a more complicated struggle for the emancipation of women, and thereby the emancipation of society, that gripped me as a reader and activist.”

AlterNet

( link)

“Swift, intense and forensic. . . . [Tax] brings the habit ‘optimism of the will and pessimism of the intellect’ to [A Road Unforeseen]. The journey takes her deep to the history of Middle East and the fate of Kurds [where] now [women] are improvising a new model of living in an enclave that is not an ethnic state but a confederation of half a dozen ethnicities, organizing co-operative economy in an egalitarian borderland called Rojava. Meredith Tax wonders whether they can survive. But she is inspired. And reading her book, you will be, too.”

openDemocracy 50.50

( link)

“This is the book I’ve been waiting for—only it’s richer, deeper, and more intriguing than I could have imagined. A Road Unforeseen is a major contribution to our understanding of feminism and Islam, of women and the world, and gives me fresh hope for change.”

Barbara Ehrenreich, author of Nickel and Dimed and Living With a Wild God

“Brian Booker is a realist the way Kafka or Ishiguro are realists—he works at the seams of our experience, in those anxious moments where we cannot be sure of our senses, our memories, or our selves. In these extraordinary and uncanny stories, anxiety, neurosis, disease, and hallucination overtake his characters and haunt the worlds they inhabit. Are You Here For What I’m Here For? teems with unsettling wisdom about all those things our minds and hearts contain that we wish they did not.”

Casey Walker, author of Last Days in Shanghai

“An unforgettable collection of people trying to learn how—and whether—to trust their own minds. Booker’s theme, like that of Kafka and W.G. Sebald, is dislocation, as much from the physical world as from the world of others and of thought. The writing brims with intelligent detail, but always in the service of its characters—people striving for ‘new, uncharted places,’ reachable nowhere else but in these singular stories.”

Salvatore Scibona, author of The End

“Reading Brian Booker’s stories is like lolling on your sofa, or strolling the streets of your town, when you look around and it dawns on you that everything you thought you recognized is suddenly . . . different. The unnerving newspaper headline, those weird jars in the fridge, the off-kilter conversation with that too friendly stranger—the quotidian and the unremarkable are rendered strange and new, and the effect is, to quote the author, ‘a little like nectar and a little like poison.’ These are terrific stories, and Booker is a terrific writer.”

Daniel Orozco, author of Orientation

“Brian Booker’s stories are contagiously readable. Like many of the maladies they so vividly describe, they seem at once believable and otherworldly, casting the spell of an uncanny fever dream. But while the characters in these tales may languish, their reader—braced by Booker’s delightfully unsettling imagination—emerges always invigorated.”

Michael Lowenthal, author of Charity Girl and The Paternity Test

“Brian Booker’s stories contain a phantasmagorical hilarity, along with a headlong momentum that only accelerates as the stories’ events grow more dire. You can open this book to any page and will find there amazing events related in a deeply unsettling style. I don’t know of any writing quite like his. Are You Here For What I’m Here For? is a brilliant debut.”

Charles Baxter, author of The Soul Thief and There’s Something I Want You to Do

“Shivery-good.”

Small Press Book Review

“Beautiful prose about not so beautiful thoughts.”

Reviews by Amos Lassen

( link)

“Engrossing.”

Historical Novels Review

( link)

“Solid. . . . Effective.”

Booklist

( link)

The Measure of Darkness seems, at first, to be about the mysterious odyssey and follies of a man with a rare neurological syndrome in which the victim cannot perceive half of the world, and worse, doesn’t know he can’t perceive it. Yet, as Liam Durcan’s acutely observed, powerfully poetic prose—which can be sensitive or steely—builds to a gut-wrenching finale, we realize that this man is a metaphor for each of us and we are all haunted by the things we don’t know we don’t know.”

Norman Doidge, author of The Brain That Changes Itself and The Brain’s Way of Healing

“An intriguing and layered medical mystery.”

Quill and Quire

( link)

“[A] worthy volume in Lock’s American Novels series, and readers will find him to be an ideal guide for a trip into the past.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“With smaller print runs and often an intimate relationship with readers, these smaller houses are able to take bigger risks than their larger counterparts and are finding truly excellent writers outside the mainstream. Don’t miss works from Open Letter, Deep Vellum, Bellevue Literary Press, Catapult, Restless Books, Two Dollar Radio and Los Angeles’ Unnamed Press; like more established independents Graywolf and McSweeney’s, they are delivering so much genuinely exciting fiction that they make it look easy.”

Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times

( link)

“Raises thought-provoking questions about the sometimes conflicting roles ambition, work, and loved ones play in a complex and fulfilled life.”

Booklist

( link)

“A deft exploration of the heart and mind that offers the pathos of a Sam Shepard play nested within the unreliable storytelling of Christopher Nolan’s Memento.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“A very highly recommended exceptional collection of seven stories. With an acute eye for detail, intelligent presentations, and an accomplished style, Booker delivers thoughtful selections that will be appreciated by short story aficionados.”

She Treads Softly

( link)

“In this beautifully written work, readers experience Martin’s caught-breath panic and, as suspense mounts, anxious concern about what Martin was really doing on the road when he was injured.”

Library Journal (starred review)

( link)

“Move over Howard Roark! . . . A lifelong obsession with a Soviet architect, a lovable McGill professor, references to Montreal firms, and sharp descriptions of New York, Montreal, Expo 67, the Eastern Townships, and Detroit-in-decline will satiate [architecture] readers.”

Canadian Architect

( link)

“Durcan cleverly uses the neurological condition that he clearly knows a lot about to demonstrate that everybody tends to neglect certain aspects of their lives, and yet they are unaware of their actions and unaware of the effect that this neglect has on other people.”

MedHum Fiction | Daily Dose: Adventures at the Intersection of Medicine and Literature

( link)

“Encompass[es] many great issues—neglect of family relationships, aging, compassion, reconciliation, vision, aesthetics, even the stifled career of a Soviet architect—but most of all, [The Measure of Darkness is] a meditation on the limits of personal power. Slowly, quietly, inexorably, Durcan makes clear just how profound those limits are and that they are imposed both from within and without.”

Best New Fiction

( link)

“Vividly rendered prose. . . . The Measure of Darkness strives to be more than an examination of what it is to have one’s ambition thwarted, and ultimately succeeds on many levels in its characterization of what it is like to not just understand, but to actually experience that subjectivity—that reality itself, is determined by nothing more than the tenuous and delicate physical tissues of one’s brain.”

Ploughshares

( link)

“An evocative reminder that we are each the architects of our own lives.”

Winnipeg Free Press

( link)

“This chilling and layered story of obsession succeeds both as a moody period piece and as an effective and memorable homage to the works of Edgar Allan Poe.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“As lyrical and alluring as Poe’s own original work, The Port-Wine Stain captures the magic, mystery, and madness of the great American author while weaving an eerie and original tale in homage to him.”

Foreword Reviews

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“With a keen eye for detail, Booker announces himself as a premier storyteller whose work crosses genre boundaries, appealing to fans of mystery, suspense, and literary fiction.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Powerfully complex. . . . The Port-Wine Stain fits perfectly with the previous two [American Novels books]: The Boy in His Winter and American Meteor. By picking a moment in U.S. history and inhabiting it with the real-life characters that defined the age, Lock allows his readers to explore the development of national identity.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“An enthralling and believable picture of the descent into madness, told in chillingly beautiful prose that Poe might envy.”

Library Journal (starred review)

“[Durcan’s] work at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital brings him into regular contact with neglect-afflicted patients, and in his second novel he puts what he has observed to great literary use, creating a complex, maddening and memorable protagonist whose struggle resonates well beyond his specific circumstance.”

Montreal Gazette

( link)

“Durcan is masterly in portraying hemispatial brain injury from a patient’s perspective. . . . [His] wry observations about the medical world are penetratingly accurate. . . . It’s a pleasure to read this sophisticated novel and mull its scalpel-sharp perceptions about what causes us to make the life decisions we do.”

Toronto Star

The Port-Wine Stain is quite simply beautifully worded and would appeal to the average reader or an aficionado of Poe’s particular brand of deliciously expressed horror.”

MedHum Fiction | Daily Dose: Adventures at the Intersection of Medicine and Literature

“It’s hard to find [a story] so original, so dead-on in its prose, so engaging, I sped my way through its thirty-something pages, completely entranced by Booker’s writing, imagination, and execution.”

Story366

( link)

“Recurring phrases and motifs—like “prepare for the worst,” the mysterious sleeping sickness, or the moral implications of certain diseases—turn [Booker’s] collection into an echo chamber where a sense of impending doom ricochets off the walls. Like a strange collection of symptoms that defies all neat diagnostic categories, these motifs suggest meaning but refuse to be placed in a single coherent framework. The reader is thus forced into the role of a literary hypochondriac and left to wonder: what is imagined? What is real?”

MedHum Fiction | Daily Dose: Adventures at the Intersection of Medicine and Literature

( link)

“Lock deftly evokes time and place in The Port-Wine Stain, avoiding the pitfalls of historical fiction as a genre. His novel is wrapped in the art, science, and culture of mid-nineteenth-century Philadelphia but truly captivates in the storytelling.”

Fine Books Magazine

( link)

“The title of the collection perfectly captures the anxiety of constant searching for: understanding, solutions, or a safe space. . . . The inner monologues are relatable and juicy. Our narrators aren’t smoke and dagger types, rather they are mothers and fathers, sons and daughters, ordinary people just moving through life. . . . None of these personas are superheroes or mad scientists, though their limitations are illuminating.”

EDGE Media Network

( link)

“Durcan’s scientific background is evident in the precision of his descriptions and the depth of his analysis of the novel’s characters. And yet, the soul of a writer shines through on every page. Durcan’s evocative imagery, talents for showing the multiple facets of human struggle, and seamless narrative structure are the marks of a true artist. Rarely does a modern novel resonate so well on so many levels.”

Life in Quebec Magazine

( link)

“Elegant and inventive. . . . Ambiguity fuels Booker’s work, and it’s what makes his short stories worth reading over and over again. Every time I open this book, I find something new.”

Rumpus

( link)

“Excellent. . . . Booker has a way of catching the nuances of the American psyche. The writing is crisp; the characters are believable.”

Lambda Literary

( link)

“Outstanding. . . . Are You Here For What I’m Here For? rings with memorable characters, scenes, and settings. Brian Booker’s magical realism reminds me of “A Very Old Man With Enormous Wings” by Gabriel García Márquez—rich with melancholic truths and mystery.”

New Pages

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“[Booker] has a markedly arresting storytelling style in this debut collection.”

Toronto Star

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“Lock’s novel engages not merely with [Edgar Allan Poe and Thomas Dent Mütter] but with decadent fin de siècle art and modernist literature that raised philosophical and moral questions about the metaphysical relations among art, science and human consciousness. The reader is just as spellbound by Lock’s story as [his novel’s narrator] is by Poe’s. . . . Echoes of Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray and Freud’s theory of the uncanny abound in this mesmerizingly twisted, richly layered homage to a pioneer of American Gothic fiction.”

New York Times Book Review

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“Unrelenting in its exploration of what we can know about ourselves, Are You Here For What I’m Here For? is an enchanting journey that lingers with its reader long after the last page.”

One Story

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“Straddling the line between a page-turning mystery and a forensic examination of the relationship between brain and self, The Measure of Darkness marks Durcan as a writer to watch.”

CBC Radio

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“Delivers seven compelling vignettes that tell different stories but are seamlessly threaded by a common factor: illness. Each individually titled vignette showcases the lyrical and phantasmagorical voice that Booker uses to colorfully display each character and their sometimes real and sometimes imagined affliction.”

Time Out New York

( link)

“An intelligently human book about politics, struggle, love and frustration.”

Justin Souther, Malaprop’s Bookstore/Cafe (Asheville, NC)

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“[A] carefully crafted story, written in a lucid and refined language. . . . The Attempt examines the perennial questions of social order, sacrifice and self-sacrifice, freedom, and acceptability of violence as the conditions for change. These questions catch us by surprise in our post-utopian times, especially when an East European author of Platzová’s generation raises them. But [she] succeeds in her attempt to bring these questions to life and show their relevance; she does it without ideology and with urgency, which make the novel a pleasure to read.”

Veronika Tuckerova, Preceptor in Slavic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

“Booker’s writing is raw, haunting, and otherworldly in the pursuit of his characters’ emotional lives. . . . I loved the diversity of this collection—there is a hypochondriac, a paranoid academic, a teenager coming into his sexuality, and a boy who finds a mermaid on the beach. I’m here for Booker’s beautiful, brilliant debut.”

Paris Review

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“Platzová’s lively prose keeps readers on tenterhooks while tracing the troubled history of an industrialist’s family and fortune and the rise and fall of anarchism.”

Edith Kurzweil, former editor of Partisan Review and author of Full Circle: A Memoir

“In her resonant and lucid tale, elegantly translated by Alex Zucker, Platzová weaves together the story of her hero’s search and an imaginary reconstruction of the passionate history that haunts him, and suggests the enduring power of ideals even after they have been shattered.”

Caleb Crain, author of Necessary Errors

“Between this and 2014’s Aaron’s Leap, Platzová is on a roll, telling rich stories of European history and the 20th century’s cumbrous fallout.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Masterful . . . in the tradition of Prus, Kundera, and Vonnegut. . . . [Platzová’s] writing style is varied, sparing, insightful, and at times nothing short of poetic. Enthusiastically recommended.”

Historical Novels Review

( link)

“Fascinating.”

Culture Trip

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“A powerfully distilled meditation on the meaning of freedom, a ferocious complexity lurking beneath its smooth and hypnotically readable surface.”

Words Without Borders

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“A lively story. . . . Platzová demonstrates an understanding of anarchy and has a remarkable ability to explain it without dumbing it down.”

World Literature Today

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“This intriguing story of a present-day Czech immigrant who imagines himself as the great grandson of a Russian anarchist is beautifully written.”

Dublin Literary Award Longlist citation

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The Attempt is historical fiction at its best. Through its narrator’s archival approach to his material, the book explores the intimate lives of a pair of fervent idealists, as well as a robber baron and his family. The result is a vivid, poignant narrative about political upheaval, both in the past and the present.”

Siri Hustvedt, author of The Blazing World

“A new literary biography of one of America’s most-loved and most mysterious poets. Charyn reveals a woman quite different from the lonely spinster we are all used to: a sexual woman engaged with herself and the world in a deeply philosophical way.”

Shorewood Public Library (Shorewood, WI)

( link)

“In A Loaded Gun, Jerome Charyn penetrates to the heart of Emily Dickinson, commonly thought to be a gifted but withdrawn spinster. He explores the ‘demon’ in her, the ‘predator,’ and should make readers go back to her poetry with a new understanding of why she still works her spell in our time.”

Herbert Gold, author of Still Alive: A Temporary Condition and When a Psychopath Falls in Love

“Jerome Charyn’s A Loaded Gun is a staggeringly brilliant meditation on Emily Dickinson’s life and work, one that will shatter forever the myth of ‘the virgin recluse.’ His shrewd and provocative reading of her life, her loves, and her times allows us to understand in new ways just how Dickinson reinvented the language of poetry itself. One of the great and most original storytellers of our time, Charyn takes us deep inside the mysterious power and glory of Dickinson’s poetry, and into the strange, bold fearlessness of her outlaw life.”

Jay Neugeboren, author of Imagining Robert and The Other Side of the World

“Provocative, sexy, pulsing with energy, and sometimes outrageous, Jerome Charyn’s A Loaded Gun revisits the subject he ‘couldn’t let go’ after completing his novel, The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson. Tunneling into the poems, letters, biographies, and works of art inspired by Dickinson, Charyn presents the poet as ‘a Satanic, catlike sibyl,’ adept with masks, tricks, and outlaw escapes from convention. Keeping the subjects of the poet’s family, religion, sexuality, and poetic ‘tradecraft’ whirling in the air, he shows us Emily Dickinson as a ‘target who never sits still.’”

Susan Snively, author of The Heart Has Many Doors and Skeptic Traveler

“Remarkable insight . . . [a] unique meditation/investigation. . . . Jerome Charyn the unpredictable, elusive, and enigmatic is a natural match for Emily Dickinson, the quintessence of these.”

Joyce Carol Oates, author of Wild Nights! and The Lost Landscape

“An intense work of literary scholarship. . . . [H]ighly recommended.”

Midwest Book Review

( link)

“A celebrated master of literary voice, Charyn inhabits Dickinson from the first page. . . . [A Loaded Gun] is a gratifying nut of poetic analysis, historical psychology, and the passionate homage of a lifelong disciple of the beloved Belle of Amherst.”

Historical Novels Review

( link)

“Outsiders and creeps, obsessives and masochists circle through dark corners in Robert Lopez’s short story collection. Master of the vandalized psyche, Lopez’s poetics combine high-octane sonic loops with desperate delusions, to form one of the most stylish and urgent books of 2016.”

Tracy O’Neill, New York Public Library

( link)

“Charyn explores how the gaps in knowledge about Dickinson’s biography and writings contribute to her ever-expanding mystique. . . . [His] inviting prose allows readers with any degree of expertise on the life and work of Dickinson an entryway into her innovative, marvelous poetry.”

Library Journal

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“A writer obsessed with the Belle of Amherst imagines her rich, sensual inner life. . . . Charyn’s ardent sleuthing yields a daring portrait of the elusive ‘enchantress’ and her world.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“A postmodernism-flavored study of Emily Dickinson’s life and work. . . . [A] lively reassessment [with] vivid commentary.”

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

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“In his reexamination of Dickinson as a sensitive recluse, Charyn does the influential poetess justice by admitting her ambition. Dickinson’s irreverence for grammatical and societal convention made her a revolutionary figure. Charyn gives the writer due credit for engineering her reputation and role, and not being a victim to it.”

Nordstrom’s The Thread

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“Charyn has followed Dickinson as assiduously as Alice down the rabbit hole. . . . Is Dickinson gay? Read Charyn’s fascinating thesis and decide.”

Lavender Magazine

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“Charyn is intrigued by the hermeneutics of biography and literary criticism. He is steeped in the work of Dickinson scholars and readers. . . . For Charyn the poems are Emily Dickinson, the vital part of herself that as a woman in nineteenth-century Massachusetts she could only fully express by keeping to herself—not as someone shy of society so much as one who knew society simply could not reciprocate what she had to offer. In other words, Charyn’s Dickinson is not agoraphobic, not a neurotic, but a writer in charge of her destiny.”

Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly

“Reading Jerome Charyn sometimes evokes the sensation of seeing Dickinson arise from her poems. . . . [H]e is about the work of enlarging the universe of her person and her poetry while he shows how much more there is still to do in fathoming her depths and contours.”

University Bookman

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“Robert Lopez is the master of deadpan dread, of the elliptical koan, of the sudden turn of language that reveals life to be so wonderfully absurd. Always with Lopez, the voice is all his—enchanting, surprising, at times devastating.”

Jess Walter, author of Beautiful Ruins

A Loaded Gun is a fascinating meditation on an individual’s relationship to language and her place in the world, and Charyn’s quest will appeal not only to poetry lovers and Dickinson fans, but to anyone who understands the joy of immersing oneself in a puzzle to which no definitive ‘answer’ yet exists.”

Late Night Library

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“An imaginative and unprecedented look at Emily Dickinson that is part biography, part literary criticism, and altogether fascinating.”

Ploughshares

( link)

“Less literary criticism than threnody, a bold, loose-limbed, Whitman-like prose-poem lamenting the constrictive previous, but still prevailing, notions of Dickinson and lauding instead a wild woman of words. . . . A Loaded Gun is an invitation to meet Dickinson on the dizzyingly high ground of her imagination from a fellow writer who has done just that with his own writing.”

Bay Area Reporter

( link)

“Charyn is a man, a New Yorker, living in the twenty-first century, yet he understands this female rebel from New England like no one else can.”

Scranton Examiner

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“One of the most distinctively different critical works on Emily Dickinson. . . . Startling, inventive, and vibrant with expressive energy.”

Key Reporter

( link)

“Ecstatic. . . . [Charyn] may be the perversely perfect critic for the poet who wandered ‘The House of Supposition — / The Glimmering Frontier that / Skirts the Acres of Perhaps—.’”

VICE magazine

( link)

“Robert Lopez is such a master of saddening hilarities that his virtuoso turns in this crazily heartbreaking, dizzyingly original new collection will restore even the most jaded reader’s faith in the fresh possibilities of American fiction.”

Gary Lutz, author of Stories in the Worst Way

“[Emily Dickinson] will blow the top of your head off, no matter what century you live in. Charyn looks at a lot of ways to see this revolutionary, subversive, explosive genius.”

Philadelphia Inquirer

( link)

“Robert Lopez’s strange, incantatory, visionary stories reveal the mysteries behind the ordinary world. You lift your head from this book and it’s as if a third eye has been opened.”

Dan Chaon, author of Await Your Reply and Stay Awake

“This beautifully written book grabs the reader from the start, with personal stories from the author’s life interwoven with history, archaeology, technology, and design.”

Esther M. Sternberg, MD, author of Healing Spaces: The Science of Place and Well-Being

“Soul-crushingly dark, exceptionally well-written, and brimming with bitter wisdom, Good People is an anthology of compellingly authored masterpieces of the short story format that are very highly recommended.”

Midwest Book Review

( link)

“If you care about your city and your happiness, read every page of this fascinating book. Places of the Heart offers a thrilling journey through the pathways of our cities and the human mind. This is no flight of fancy. It’s an evidence-based exploration of how the places we inhabit change our minds and bodies. Colin Ellard is one of the world’s foremost thinkers on the neuroscience of urban design. Here he offers an entirely new way to understand our cities—and ourselves.”

Charles Montgomery, author of Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design

“In A Loaded Gun, [Charyn] is again out to release Dickinson from the myths that have enclosed her. . . . With essayistic chapters on Dickinson’s mother, her dog, her servants, her photographic image, her poetic fragments—Charyn’s book is perhaps best viewed as yet another imaginative attempt to get to the source of Dickinson’s emotional intensity, and to imagine an ‘Emily Dickinson for the 21st Century.’”

New York Review of Books

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“Ellard shows that simple distinctions between nature and culture tend to collapse where many modern technologies are concerned. . . . Many of the trends with which Ellard engages—such as virtual reality technology that would allow individuals to live in a curated, mediated, personalized, and highly commodified bubble—sound as if they were pulled from the pages of Ray Bradburyesque science fiction.”

Quill & Quire

( link)

“A dizzying, disturbing tour of what might be going on in the minds of ‘good people.’ . . . Those who enjoy dark humor with a dose of sado-masochistic sexual fantasy will take pleasure in [Lopez’s] spare prose and ability to spear a thought on first strike.”

Foreword Reviews

( link)

“Personalities ranging from the amusingly neurotic to the borderline psychotic shape the 20 quirky stories in this collection. . . . Lopez shows uncommon skill at evoking both laughs and shudders, sometimes in the same story.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Aren’t architects and urban planners trained to design buildings and cities? Why should a psychologist have a say in this? Because Ellard brings tools to the design board that should help ensure more positive responses to urban environment, from a mundane alleyway to an awe-inspiring cathedral or city hall. . . . Places of the Heart should stimulate debate about how our cities are shaped and how they shape us.”

Waterloo Region Record

( link)

“Tightly knit. . . . Recommended for lovers of darkly humorous, strangely illuminating fiction.”

Booklist

“Read [Good People] to stumble into the sunlight afterward. . . . Depressing, inventive, and marvelous—a thought-provoking path to feeling awful.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

( link)

“A magnetic nonfiction reevaluation of the mystifying, radical, perhaps bisexual, and maybe greatest-ever American poet.”

O, The Oprah Magazine

( link)

“A powerful argument for the paramount importance of our daily surroundings. . . . This book offers readers a deeper appreciation of how architectural and environmental design can affect human well-being. Ellard provides the scientific backing to affirm what we intuitively know: that designing and building better surroundings can have tangible effects on our health and happiness.”

Canadian Architect

( link)

“Lopez uses a close point of view to maximum effect, drawing the reader into each character’s mindset; despite the sense of complicity this imparts, the dark humor and discomfort of these stories provides just as much enlightenment.”

Late Night Library

( link)

“One of Lopez’s many gifts is being able to make accessible, through humor and wit, what might otherwise frighten us. Good People makes us question our own ideas about morality and the weight of our thoughts and actions, all the while entertaining us with the plights of others.”

About.com

( link)

“Ellard breaks down psychological and neurological information in an accessible way. . . . Highly recommended.”

Book Riot

( link)

“Whatever you believe about what separates good people from bad ones, forget it. Robert Lopez will challenge all of those assumptions in this arresting short story collection.”

Bookish

( link)

“Remarkably intimate. . . . Deliciously clever.”

Best New Fiction

( link)

“Wide-ranging and absorbing. . . . Powerfully and comprehensively written. . . . An exceptional introduction to a vital part of the human experience.”

Colorado Review

( link)

“Lopez does amazing things with prose, tone, and sparsity.”

Vol. 1 Brooklyn

( link)

“[Lopez’s] style is what would happen if Al Camus and Gertrude Stein teamed up to take down Hemingway.”

JMWW Journal

( link)

“Meshing recent findings with thoughtful appraisals of their implications, Ellard looks at spaces and the awe, lust, boredom, affection or anxiety that they trigger. He is richly insightful, particularly on digital encroachments into the experience of place.”

Nature

“Dark humor finds its way into these confessional stories and throughout the collection, the diverse voices ring true. Lopez has said music played a big part in his experience growing up, and it’s apparent in Good People that his writing has found its rhythm.”

Raleigh Review

“A great read.”

Rudy Maxa, Rudy Maxa’s World

( link)

“A really great book.”

Ira Flatow, Science Friday

( link)

“From Neolithic monuments that awe to ‘playground casinos’ that empty wallets, Ellard argues that a scientific understanding of how our surroundings affect us must be the foundation on which we build the cities and homes of tomorrow.”

Discover

( link)

“These [stories are] trance-like rants, full of strange dark bitter, bitter comedy. Nobody else does whatever the hell it is [Lopez]’s doing better than he does.”

BOMB magazine

( link)

“Lopez has the ability to give the reader whiplash with his unconventional and bewitching stories.”

Los Angeles Times

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“An adventure tale that practically bleeds Americana. . . . For fans of Little Big Man, this might be the book you didn’t know you were waiting for.”

LitReactor

“Lock creates a memorable character who sees it all while providing a shimmering eulogy for the loss of one America in order to create another.”

Bluegrass, Books, and Brainstorms

( link)

“In one slender book, Norman Lock has made use of all the tools in the historical fiction writer’s arsenal, telling a sweeping story of the American West.”

Best New Fiction

( link)

American Meteor is a fascinating, prophetic contribution to recent historical fiction, and Lock is plainly an author well worth our attention.”

Monkeybicycle

( link)

American Meteor is at its heart a frontier yarn of adventure and discovery, insight and yearning [for] readers who savor the well-turned phrase and those who demand a little swash with their buckle.”

Four Corners Free Press

( link)

“Lovely, burnished prose.”

Small Press Book Review

( link)

“Like the western sky, American Meteor stretches to the horizon in all directions. . . . A lovely panorama to behold.”

New York Journal of Books

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“[American Meteor] is not only a history lesson but also a reading pleasure.”

Historical Novels Review

( link)

“Successfully blends beautiful language reminiscent of 19th-century prose with cynicism and bald, ugly truth.”

Library Journal

( link)

“Rather like Thomas Berger’s Little Big Man. . . . [Lock] writes beautifully, with many subtle, complex insights.”

Booklist

( link)

“Memorably encompasses grand themes and notions of transcendence without ever losing sight of the grit and moral horrors present in the period.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

American Meteor is, at its core, a spiritual treatise that forces its readers to examine their own role in history’s unceasing march forward [and] casts new and lyrical light on our nation’s violent past.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers (starred review)

( link)

“[American Meteor] feels like a campfire story, an old-fashioned yarn full of rich historical detail about hard-earned lessons and learning to do right.”

Publishers Weekly (“Pick of the Week” starred review)

( link)

“As the railroad spread across the United States, it became part of the mythology of the American West. So too did photographs of the landscapes, documented by a number of renowned photographers. The protagonist of Norman Lock’s American Meteor, a young man seeking his fortune, comes into contact with both of these strands of the West—but where they lead him is anywhere but familiar.”

InsideHook

( link)

“For a young country, the United States has had a violent and complicated history, one that is brilliantly brought to life by Norman Lock’s American Meteor. An enthralling coming-of-age story that also follows the tale of Manifest Destiny, American Meteor makes history as interesting as the year’s biggest blockbusters.”

Bustle

( link)

“A tall tale, with a fascinating mix of historical facts and sound teachings. . . . [American Meteor] includes history, fiction, comedy and elegy and challenges the reader to examine the American story and to search for not what is true, but for what is truth.”

Missourian

( link)

“[Walt Whitman] hovers over [American Meteor], just as Mark Twain’s spirit pervaded The Boy in His Winter. . . . Like all Mr. Lock’s books, this is an ambitious work, where ideas crowd together on the page like desperate men on a battlefield.”

Wall Street Journal

( link)

“Sheds brilliant light along the meteoric path of American westward expansion. . . . [A] pithy, compact beautifully conducted version of the American Dream, from its portrait of the young wounded soldier in the beginning to its powerful rendering of Crazy Horse’s prophecy for life on earth at the end.”

NPR

( link)

“I read The Surfacing in Gjoa Haven, where Franklin Expedition spirits seem to cry out on the winter winds, and Cormac James’ writing spoke through the midday twilight with the chill of a voice from the distant past. Like the High Arctic world that he masterfully conjures, his storytelling is beautifully stark and captivating. The Surfacing lures with the tundra’s promise: new life can come from death.”

Paul Watson, former Arctic correspondent for the Toronto Star and author of Ice Ghosts: the Epic Hunt For the Lost Franklin Expedition

“Cormac James’ writing is very assured, with a harsh poetic edge. His evocations of barren landscape, sea weather, pack ice, and frozen skies are powerful and compelling.”

Rose Tremain

“The great topic of Cormac James’ The Surfacing is the reach of human possibility. The prose is calm, vivid, hypnotic, and acutely piercing. James is attuned to the psychological moment: this is a book about fatherhood and all its attendant terrors. James recognizes the surfacing of love in the face of solitude. It’s a remarkable achievement, a stylish novel, full of music and quiet control. This is a writer that I’d like to see hurry—I’m looking forward already to the next book.”

Colum McCann

“An extraordinary novel, combining a powerful narrative with a considered and poetic use of language in a way that is not often seen these days. Reading the book, I recalled the dramatic natural landscape of Jack London and the wild untamed seas of William Golding. Cormac James’ writing is ambitious enough to be compared with either.”

John Boyne

“Written as linked recollections, the stories in Monastery divulge a man who introduces himself not with who he is but through what he cares to know about someone else.”

Todd Wellman, Boswell Book Company (Milwaukee, WI)

“Prismatically expands the possibilities for interpretation. . . . Detachment and dislocation have rarely been so well depicted as this.”

James Crossley, Island Books (Mercer Island, WA) at Three Percent

( link)

“James’s sharp prose and attention to detail . . . leaves a lasting impression.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Much like his wispy, smoke-filled covers, Eduardo Halfon’s writing has an ephemeral quality that is both wondrous and intriguing. In Monastery, the same mysterious narrator as in Halfon’s previous work, The Polish Boxer, returns to lead us once again on nomadic travels through time and place.”

Shawn Donley, Powell’s Books (Portland, OR)

( link)

“Hypnotic . . . a slow-burning psychological study. . . . Underneath all the ice, there is real emotional depth.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“[Monastery is] filled with the stuff of life. . . . Halfon’s talent is to take these seemingly ‘insignificant’ details and make them immensely human and make the reader think, taking the reader places he/she will not expect to go; and he does it with such grace you can’t help but be pulled along and become immersed in it.”

Desvarío

( link)

“[Monastery] is about family and love and confusion, about being together and alone, about identity and all that entails. It’s about having faith in who we are and in who we might be and even in who we (or others) might say we are. It’s about losing that faith or rediscovering it or worrying we’ll never have it. . . . Halfon’s writing is rich . . . beautiful and of course, True.”

Bookconscious

( link)

“A rare blend of adventure narrative and literary fiction, survival story and philosophical musing. . . . What emerges is a pure and transcendent vision of the joy of fatherhood.”

Historical Novels Review

( link)

“A stunning historical novel. . . . A chiseled, cool work of poetic brilliance. . . . A mesmerizing novel about never-ending ice, bitter cold, shipwrecks and fatherhood.”

Shelf Awareness

( link)

“As much Jack London as Daniel Woodrell. . . . James cleverly fashions a tense, controlled work that is bolstered by weighty research.”

Irish Examiner

( link)

“Although [The Surfacing] initially appears to focus on the unwinnable crusade of man against nature, at its centre is a love story—not a romance between adults but between a father and the son he learns to love. . . . A moving reminder that some of the biggest journeys in life don’t involve going anywhere at all.”

Financial Times

( link)

“James uses the sublime appeal of the Arctic and the extreme situation of his characters as the stage for an essentially domestic psychological novel. . . . The prose matches the landscape, rigorously unadorned, returning the gaze of a reader led into a world without hiding places.”

Guardian

( link)

“If I were still a bookseller, I’d happily place [Monastery] in your hands and say, ‘You’ve got to read th[is]!’”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

( link)

“Explicates the difficulties of epidemiology and of turning their findings into effective, useful action in the face of political and economic resistance. . . . If you are sometimes bewildered by the current struggle for science to make a dent against ignorance, it’s all here in Keep Out of Reach of Children.”

Portland Book Review

( link)

“[A] harrowing Arctic adventure.”

Oprah.com

( link)

“In this enigmatic follow-up to Halfon’s lovely The Polish Boxer, readers follow the same narrator as he journeys around Central America, Europe, and Israel. . . . As if slowly filling in negative space, Halfon gradually gives shape to the uneasy relationship he has with his own allegiances and heritage as well as the outsider position he occupies wherever he goes, even within his own country. A subtle work that defies easy categorization in the best way.”

Booklist

“Gratifyingly defies expectations.”

New York Times Book Review

“[A] sly, quietly penetrating account of life on the road. . . . One of [Halfon’s] special attributes is never forcing meaning on his experiences. . . . But he’s also great at reversing our initial impressions of people and places. . . . A rising star among Latin writers, Halfon is a lively traveling companion.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“Far more than a story of parental interests or threats to children’s health. . . . Recommend[ed] for any concerned with public health management, research studies, aspirin and its management, or the processes of intervention, protection, and research that dictate the choices of public health as a whole.”

Midwest Book Review/California Bookwatch

( link)

“Halfon gives voice to a lesser-known sector of the Jewish diaspora, reminding us in the process of the ways in which identity is both fluid and immutable.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Meticulous. . . . If one thing becomes clear in Largent’s narrative, it’s that the regulatory process itself is disordered.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“An absorbing study of the interrelationships of science, business, politics, and public health. . . . Both professionals and lay readers interested in science will enjoy this work.”

Library Journal

“A well-researched history of Reye’s syndrome that explores how science, medicine and politics interact. . . . As Largent examines the dispute over whether to require warning labels on bottles of aspirin, he also scrutinizes the actions and interactions—some might say the machinations—of pharmaceutical companies, consumer rights groups, epidemiologists, public health officials, courts and the U.S. Congress. . . . A revealing work.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“In this fascinating account, Reye’s syndrome–survivor Largent weaves his own tale throughout the bigger story about this puzzling medical condition. . . . This thought-provoking work certainly meets the goal of the publisher’s Pathologies Series to chart ‘the impact of disease on human individuals and populations from the biological, historical, and cultural perspectives.’”

Booklist

( link)

“A fascinating history of a public health crisis. Compellingly written and insightful, Keep Out of Reach of Children traces the discovery of Reye’s syndrome, research into its causes, industry’s efforts to avoid warning labels on one suspected cause, aspirin, and the feared disease’s sudden disappearance. Largent’s empathy is with the myriad children and parents harmed by the disease, while he challenges the triumphalist view that labeling solved the crisis.”

Erik M. Conway, coauthor of Merchants of Doubt

“[The protagonist] may be the perpetual wanderer, but his meditations are focused and absorbing.”

Library Journal Indie Fiction in Translation of the Year citation

( link)

“An enjoyable and informative contribution to the history of astrophysics. . . . [Hirshfeld] is a fine writer not only in the macro sense—his overall tale is a compelling one—but also in the micro sense—he writes terrific sentences, sometimes slyly witty, sometimes filled with interesting metaphors.”

International Astronomical Union

“Call it a confirmation bias. Everywhere I turned this year, I saw a new expression of Arab Jewish identity. The revival seems to be happening across all fields—literature, food, music—yet somehow nobody’s talking about it. . . . Imagine my excitement, then, when I discovered Eduardo Halfon’s new novel, Monastery, in which the conflicted, tragicomic protagonist denies his Arab identity when talking to certain Jews, and his Jewish identity when talking to certain Arabs.”

Jewish Daily Forward

( link)

Monastery, which looks at Guatemala and the world from the divided perspective of a Jew and Guatemalan [displays] a constantly surprising sensitivity, even tenderness toward both worlds and the ways they resonate even when they appear deaf to each other. . . . In the admirable translation by Lisa Dillman and Daniel Hahn, the idiomatic, contemporary American English voice comes across as innate to this cosmopolitan narrator, without losing all its Spanishness.”

The Common

( link)

“Intelligent and authentic.”

Jewish Book Council

( link)

“One senses Kafka’s ghost, along with Bolaño’s, lingering in the shadows.”

New York Review of Books

( link)

“Offer[s] surprise and revelation at every turn.”

Reader’s Digest

( link)

“Largent’s engaging and honest account explores how medical mysteries are shaped by prevailing narratives about venal drug companies, heroic investigators, and Johnny-come-lately politicians.”

Helen Epstein, author of The Invisible Cure

“A moving, reflective, and humbly resounding work of fiction. . . . Monastery, with its beautiful prose, vibrant imagery, and singular outlook on the abundance of individual and shared experience, deserves to win this year’s Best Translated Book Award. As an ambassador of both worldly wonder and sublime storytelling, Eduardo Halfon’s Monastery, despite its brevity, is truly a marvel.”

Best Translated Book Award Longlist citation

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“A thrilling historical account of the rise of astrophysics, the early years of astronomical photography and spectroscopy, and the innovations that transformed the astronomical telescope in the nineteenth century. Alan Hirshfeld’s thoroughly researched narrative is accessible, entertaining, and scholarly, and includes many pioneers who have been overlooked until now. I greatly admire this outstanding contribution to the history of astronomy.”

Simon Mitton, co-author of Heart of Darkness: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Invisible Universe and author of Fred Hoyle: A Life in Science

“Writing this book would ideally require an author with an extensive knowledge of astronomy, including astronomical instruments, a deep understanding of the ways of thought of astronomers, a broad range of historical knowledge, and an exceptional skill at making astronomical ideas clear and engaging. Alan Hirshfeld possesses all of these skills. His Starlight Detectives is remarkable.”

Michael J. Crowe, author of The Extraterrestrial Life Debate, 1750–1900

“Hirshfeld documents how the practice of astronomy changed between 1840 and 1940 thanks to innovative pioneers whose efforts made it possible to capture and preserve otherwise faint and fleeting images, and to decipher the cryptographic messages found in the light of celestial bodies. His riveting narrative brings to life their challenges, failures, and successes. It will captivate all who have observed the night sky.”

Barbara J. Becker, author of Unravelling Starlight: William and Margaret Huggins and the Rise of the New Astronomy

“Beautifully written, Starlight Detectives reminds us how the wonders of the modern universe would never have been possible without the ingenious advances made by pioneering scientists in the nineteenth century. They were the ones who first learned how to read the messages hidden within a star’s radiations. With his poetic eye on the nighttime sky, Alan Hirshfeld engagingly shows how science arrived, step by step, at its revolutionary discovery that we live in but one galaxy amid multitudes flying outward in an expanding universe. A must-read for astronomy and history of science aficionados alike.”

Marcia Bartusiak, author of The Day We Found the Universe and Archives of the Universe

“Bellevue Literary Press is a small press in New York that publishes books about the intersection between the arts and sciences. It’s fascinating. Their books are just gems. It’s hard to find a Bellevue Literary Press book that, for me, doesn’t work.”

Nancy Pearl, KUOW’s The Record

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“Reveal[s] the persistence and imagination required for scientific progress.”

Princeton Alumni Weekly

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“A well-written and enjoyable title for astronomers—professional and amateur alike—as well as science history fans.”

Library Journal

“This comprehensive rundown of the great names in astronomical detection makes for compelling biographical reading. . . . Every researcher presented in this book is as lively in the text as if they were still personally scouring the heavens.”

Foreword Reviews (5-star review)

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“Highly illuminating. . . . A delightful, detailed chronicle of great men (and a rare woman) whose fascination with the night sky and the technology necessary to study it led to today’s dramatic discoveries.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

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