“A tour-de-force. . . . Eminently well written, the story lines immerse the reader in situations and events that provide real insight into the roles of numerous amateur (here meaning not formally trained) astronomers in moving the field forward, as well as how professional astronomers have worked with amateurs to the advantage of both. Hirshfeld’s writing style brings the 19th century back to life and provides a rich tapestry of astronomical history.”

American Journal of Physics

“Th[e] race to see deep space is told with palpable relish. . . . No less rousing is Hirshfeld’s rendition of the coda, as Edwin Hubble—using the 2.5-metre reflector telescope at Mount Wilson, California—discovered the expansion of the Universe and opened up the cosmos.”

Nature: International Weekly Journal of Science

“Even today, amateurs trade images over the Internet that professional astronomers incorporate into their work. This abundant crossplay informs Starlight Detectives . . . Author Alan Hirshfeld explains how ‘the human eye itself was a fundamental roadblock to progress’ and how the heroes are the ones who made higher-quality telescopes and photographs. Those who applied substances like collodion, and then gelatin, to create crisper photographic negatives, are key here. And because of mounting technological advances, our era boasts great gains and great excitement. Hirshfeld sums it up: ‘The classical astronomer’s question, ‘Where is a star?’ evolved into the astrophysicist’s more profound inquiry, ‘What is a star?’”

Boston Globe

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“Hirshfeld tells this climactic discovery of the expanding universe with great verve and sweep, as befits a story whose scope, characters and import leave most fiction far behind.”

Wall Street Journal

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Tales of pioneering skywatchers and their discoveries in the 19th century show how modern astronomy was born.”

Science News

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“Astrophysicist Hirshfeld chronicles the radical changes in our conception of the cosmos.”

Scientific American (recommended feature review)

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“Michael Coffey brings us so close to his subjects it is almost embarrassing. Whether he’s writing about a sinning priest or a man who’s made a career out of branding or about himself, we can smell Coffey’s protagonists and feel their breath on our cheek. Like Chekhov, he must be a notebook writer; how else to explain the strange quirks and the perfect but unaccountable details that animate these intimate portraits?”

Edmund White, author of Inside a Pearl and A Boy’s Own Story

“A masterful balance of science, history and rich narrative.”

Discover magazine

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“Sherwood Anderson would recognize this world of lonely, longing characters, whose surface lives Coffey tenderly plumbs. These beautiful stories—spare, rich, wise and compelling—go to the heart.”

Frederic Tuten, author of Self Portraits: Fictions and Tintin in the New World

“J.L. Moreno was a pioneer of twentieth-century theater and psychotherapy. A remarkable work, Impromptu Man should be required reading for therapists and dramatists alike.”

Jeffrey K. Zeig, PhD, founder and director of The Milton H. Erickson Foundation

Starlight Detectives is just the sort of richly veined book I love to read—full of scientific history and discoveries, peopled by real heroes and rogues, and told with absolute authority. Alan Hirshfeld’s wide, deep knowledge of astronomy arises not only from the most careful scholarship, but also from the years he’s spent at the telescope, posing his own questions to the stars.”

Dava Sobel, author of A More Perfect Heaven: How Copernicus Revolutionized the Cosmos and Longitude

“J.L. Moreno, who fathered psychodrama, set a new world in motion. I doubt he ever dreamed his life’s work would change the lives of trial lawyers and the people they represent, providing us with a new way to communicate and give justice a chance. This book restores him to his rightful place in history.”

Gerry Spence, author of How to Argue and Win Every Time and founder of Trial Lawyers College

“Once I started reading these stories, I couldn’t stop. They absorbed me thoroughly, with their taut narratives and evocative language—the language of a poet. The matter of identity looms over them, giving them a kind of brooding and breeding presence, one that animates the past, makes it not only real, but more than real. Michael Coffey has reached deep into his own past here, but that reality has been magically transformed, transmogrified, as the work of fiction does its job. Coffey is a fine, witty, and vibrant writer. I recommend The Business of Naming Things with gratitude to the author.”

Jay Parini, author of Jesus: The Human Face of God and The Last Station

“Jonathan D. Moreno’s thoughtful assessment of his father, J.L. Moreno, pays overdue tribute to a pioneering maverick in psychology whose concept of ‘psychodrama’ also made an important impact in the arts. Tracing Moreno’s connections with and influence on such organizations as the Provincetown Players, the Civic Repertory, the Group Theatre, the Federal Theatre Project, and the Actors Studio, this intriguing book adds a new layer to our understanding of progressive American theater in the 1930s and beyond.”

Wendy Smith, author of Real Life Drama: The Group Theatre and America, 1931-1940

“A captivating memoir cum sixties cultural history by the son of the radical but forgotten psychotherapist who planted the vibrant seeds of our social network society.”

Sally Satel, MD, coauthor of Brainwashed: The Seductive Appeal of Mindless Neuroscience

“A splendid account of one the most creative social scientists of the twentieth century. Impromptu Man is filled with fascinating anecdotes, many of them about famous and infamous people, and brilliant insights as to how Moreno’s work transformed vast segments of society and eventually eluded his control. This book is frank, funny, fascinating, and long overdue.”

Stanley Krippner, PhD, Professor of Psychology, Saybrook University

“Jonathan D. Moreno has written an informative book about an amazing man who, over one hundred years ago, saw improv theater as a way to change the world. Today his ideas are more relevant than ever.”

Jonathan Fox, founder of Playback Theatre and editor of The Essential Moreno

The Poetic Species explores the intersection of science and the arts in relation to the staggering environmental crisis the world is encountering. I am encouraged by this call to action by both scientific and literary communities and curious about the possible responses.”

World Literature Today Editor’s Pick citation

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“Well researched. . . . Between the Encounter movement of the 1960s, military morale, humanistic psychology, Second City improv, and psychodrama training for trial lawyers, J.L.’s influence appears across domains and ‘it’s hard to exaggerate the extent to which [his] pioneering ideas have penetrated the culture’ since.”

Publishers Weekly

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“An adept introduction to an innovative thinker.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“A candid, engaging biography of an important pioneer in social psychology.”

Library Journal

“Coffey name-drops some serious literary heavyweights in the pages of his stories. Harold Brodkey, J.F. Powers, Henrik Ibsen and James Joyce all make an appearance. But that doesn’t mean that these stories are only for ‘pointy-headed’ literary types. Coffey’s writing hearkens back to stylists of 40 or 50 years ago and his subject matter is ‘meat and potatoes’ basic: the relationships between men and women and fathers and sons.”

Wayne Roylance, New York Public Library

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“Fascinating. . . . Instead of a couch, [J.L. Moreno] used dramaturgy: a stage, role players, and an audience to put the patient’s concerns into heightened awareness and action. Woody Allen, Dustin Hoffman, and Alan Alda were among many theater people who attended Moreno’s psychodrama demonstrations. . . . The essence of Moreno’s contribution to dramaturgy is that theater is spontaneous, co-creative, authentic, and transformative action.”

Broad Street Review

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“Michael Coffey is a writer who revels in language and in storytelling. In this group of beguiling short stories, the writing is rich, subtle, and often surprising.”

Bellevue Literary Review

“[Jonathan] D. Moreno’s book is an especially engaging read, particularly for his attention to the effects of his father’s work on popular culture, and his ability to recount anecdotes from childhood, such as that he literally ‘grew up in a mental hospital.’ . . . Read [Impromptu Man] for an intimate account of what it was like to grow up in the Moreno family and how one might imagine, in serendipitous ways, that experience may have led to J. D. Moreno’s eminent career as a professor of bioethics.”

PsycCRITIQUES

“Well-crafted stories, thick with literary references. . . . Carefully chiseled. . . Sober and smart writing that evokes the more mannered American stylists of the 1960s and ’70s.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“Riveting. . . . Coffey brilliantly examines the efforts of a mother to cope with her son’s death in ‘Moon Over Quabbin’; he uses the J.F.K. assassination as a backdrop to a tale about a sinful priest in ‘Inn of the Nations’; and, in ‘Sons,’ he explores a difficult father-son relationship in the context of a possible Obama assassination attempt. . . . Vibrant and unsparing.”

Publishers Weekly (starred and boxed review)

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“No matter in what direction you turned, J.L. Moreno was there: a creative, charismatic force, challenging the psychiatric hegemony of the times and daring to create theory and methods to promote growth in individuals, groups, and society. . . . [Impromptu Man] should be required reading for all graduate students and group practitioners in this field.”

Group Psychologist

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“[A Solemn Pleasure] may be the handbook of the modern writer.”

Brookline Booksmith Small Press Book Club at GrubStreet

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Impromptu Man captures the remarkable impact of a singular genius, J.L. Moreno, whose creations—the best-known being psychodrama—have shaped our culture in myriad ways, many unrecognized. The record will be set straight for all time by this can’t-put-down biography, a tribute by Jonathan D. Moreno to his father’s masterly legacy.”

Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ

“Pritchard has written an incredible book that is an important testament to the role of the writer as society’s moral and spiritual compass. In A Solemn Pleasure, Pritchard meshes the personal with the political in a bold and deeply honest composition that will make every reader a more compassionate human being. This book is written from the heart. It will refresh your passions and inspire the deepest yearnings of your soul. I found myself underlining, taking notes, and feeling inspired to write.”

Jen Percy, author of Demon Camp

“The principle of consilience, or the unity of knowledge, infuses this conversation between biologist E. O. Wilson and poet Robert Hass. . . . The eminent duo explore echoes and parallels in their respective fields with eloquent concision, from Wilson’s advice to poets (“Colonize science”) to Hass’s musings on the interplay of selfish gene and social imperative in imagination.”

Nature: International Weekly Journal of Science

“Superb. . . . Startlingly original and at times darkly funny. . . . [Coffey’s] characters are as flawed and complicated as they are recognizable and sympathetic; all fiction readers can enjoy.”

Library Journal (starred review)

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“Enchanting. . . . The Poetic Species is a wonderful read in its entirety, short yet infinitely simulating.”

Maria Popova, Marginalian

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“‘Great writers are witnesses to the spirit of their age,’ Pritchard declares. And in her splendid collection of essays, A Solemn Pleasure, she bears witness to matters great and small, from the quotidian joys of a borrowed room in London to the life and example of Georgia O’Keeffe to the plight of the Lost Boys of Sudan. Art is for her ‘a form of active prayer,’ which leads her to journey both inward and outward, notably to Afghanistan, where the consequences of the war on terror become tragically clear. This is the spirit of our age, gracefully rendered in Pritchard’s essays, which will stand the test of time.”

Christopher Merrill, director of the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa and author of The Tree of the Doves: Ceremony, Expedition, War

“Gorgeous and moving. . . . Each of these essays confirms that to write is to think and feel, to take part in the profound and sacred act of witness. Read together—and the book is so arresting that many readers will finish it in a single sitting—the essays amount to a clear and irrefutable mandate for empathy.”

Bret Anthony Johnston (from the foreword)

“Full of lovely sentences that often achieve an almost mystical, spiritual power.”

NewPages

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“From grief to daily rituals to the shape of a dachshund, Pritchard insightfully connects the most obscure of subjects to reveal gems of truth about the human experience.”

Foreword Reviews

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“Heartfelt . . . bear[s] powerful witness to suffering, compassion, and transcendence.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“Moving. . . . Readers will treasure the book’s numerous memorable moments.”

Publishers Weekly

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“As insightful as it is engaging. . . . Pritchard will make you cry, think, and laugh; each essay is filled with wit and wisdom. . . . A great read for writers, readers looking for enlightenment, and those who savor nonfiction that explores the spiritual through the everyday.”

Library Journal (starred review)

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“Ethically rich. . . . Pay attention to the surge of [Pritchard’s] mind and the spiritual energy she demonstrates.”

Spirituality & Practice

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“Elegant, funny. . . . Pritchard’s own prose embodies her conviction that great writing involves both imagining the inner life of its subjects and a ‘bearing witness’ to the human condition and the transcendent mystery that surrounds it.”

Image: Art, Faith, Mystery

“A fine, delicate essayist. . . . Pritchard’s writing is inspiring.”

Literary Hub

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“A spirited, intelligent, wide-ranging exploration of the joys, frustrations, and trials of the life of the writer.”

Colorado Review

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“Pritchard’s essay collection is one to keep by your bedside to read again and again. Like Lewis Hyde’s The Gift, Pritchard plumbs the depths of why we write, in order to uncover the important reasons we need to write. . . . This book will give you super powers.”

Atticus Review

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“Pritchard once again validates the assertion that all true art is moral, as it instructs by seeking to improve life.”

World Literature Today

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“Altogether magnificent. . . . [The essay “Spirit and Vision”] bears that cynicism-disarming quality of a commencement address and enchants the psyche like an incantation. . . . [Pritchard] ends the piece like one might a commencement address—and if this were one, it would certainly be among the greatest commencement addresses of all time. . . . Complement A Solemn Pleasure, seriously pleasurable in its entirety, with Susan Sontag’s advice to writers, Virginia Woolf on writing and self-doubt, and Cheryl Strayed’s no-nonsense wisdom on the craft.”

Maria Popova, Marginalian

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“Invite[s] underlining, re-reading, and reading aloud. . . . Pritchard [is] a beautifully descriptive stylist and deeply committed artist. . . . A Solemn Pleasure is not only a great way for readers to meet [her], but an excellent choice to mark the launch of Bellevue Literary Press’ new series, The Art of the Essay.”

Rain Taxi Review of Books

“I read a short excerpt and was immediately hooked. . . . I’m no time traveler myself, but the novel has all the makings of a wonderful film, so I wouldn’t be surprised if you’re placing your hold on the DVD in a few years, too.”

Karen McBride, Barrington Area Library in the Barrington Courier-Review

“In Norman Lock’s imaginative and brilliant riff on Twain’s great American novel, Huck tells us his new stories and does not leave us until he is an old man in 2077, inviting us to recall the original novel and to review American history with a fresh eye. . . . This is a provocative and challenging book.”

Carole Goldberg, Hartford Public Library

“The voice of Huck Finn is so vivid and felt in this novel one loses the sense there’s an author behind it. . . . [The Boy in His Winter] is a testament to friendship, sharing, a slow life derailed and a look at America from a truly unique perspective. Huck is unforgettable and this book then even more so.”

Sheryl Cotleur, Copperfield’s Books (Northern California’s Sonoma County)

The Boy in His Winter is delightful, glorious. It is less a book one merely reads than itself a river one allows oneself to be borne along in, carried in currents and eddies, lured to false banks and sunken towns and so forth. The places Huck/Albert winds up—in the yacht industry, Googling the world’s rivers, and finally impersonating his nemesis—seem so perfect, yet each one serves as a burst of surprise. And, of course, the sentences—what is one to say about them except that Lock is one of our great miniaturists, to be read only a single time at one’s peril. I will recommend it to every reader I know.”

Tim Horvath, author of Understories

“In this surreal and otherworldly river journey through time, Norman Lock transports Huck Finn down the Mississippi and deep into America’s history—and future. Elegant and imaginative, The Boy in His Winter is a tale that’s as hypnotic as it is profound.”

Gilbert King, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America

“If you are interested in beasts of any kind, imaginary or not, [Muir’s] writing is lovely and the chapters make it an easy book to pick up and read a few chapters at a time.”

Elaine Mattson, Edmonds Bookshop (Edmonds, WA)

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“This fine book full of humor and love of animals real or imagined would be a great read for any explorer.”

Molly Pace, The Fountainhead Bookstore (Hendersonville, NC)

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“This imaginative collection constitutes a bestiary that is as curious as it is unsettling.”

WORD Bookstores (Brooklyn, NY & Jersey City, NJ)

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“I read Norman Lock’s The Boy in His Winter with delight and amazement. Styled in the vernacular of a rapidly changing America, it stays true to the themes of Mark Twain’s original: class relations, race and slavery, childhood innocence, moral hypocrisy—and, of course, the stark beauty and unforgiving nature of America’s greatest river. I finished this absolutely elegant narrative feeling that Huck Finn has never been more alive.”

David M. Oshinsky, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Polio: An American Story and Worse Than Slavery: Parchman Farm and the Ordeal of Jim Crow Justice

“A wonderful meditation on the struggle to dovetail one’s present self with the one’s past.”

Friends of Atticus

“A sobering read and a wake-up call . . . which firmly places Lock as one of the most talented authors working today.”

Upcoming4Me

“If you’ve lost your capacity to wonder at the myriad forms of life swarming, burrowing, swooping, and gamboling around you—and inside you—then look no further. Equal parts science and imagination, Invisible Beasts takes us on a journey to another world that turns out to be our world, as if seen and experienced for the first time. If you’re interested in what it means to be alive, and share life, then read this book.”

Cary Wolfe, author of Before the Law: Humans and Other Animals in a Biopolitical Frame and What is Posthumanism?

“Many writers are inspired by symbiology—the interdependence of nature, culture, and technology—but Muir’s intelligence and breadth of knowledge are exceptional. You could not find a better little book of ethics, politics, and ecology for our time.”

Regenia Gagnier, author of The Insatiability of Human Wants and Individualism, Decadence and Globalization

“An eclectic hybrid of literary appropriation, Zelig-like historical narrative, time-travel tale and old-style picaresque.”

Kirkus Reviews

“Remarkable. . . . Lock writes some of the most deceptively beautiful sentences in contemporary fiction. Beneath their clarity are layers of cultural and literary references, profound questions about loyalty, race, the possibility of social progress, and the nature of truth. They merge with an iconic American character, tall tales intact, to create something entirely new—an American fable of ideas.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers (starred review)

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Invisible Beasts is a delightful and stunning feat of environmental imagination, endlessly enjoyable and fascinating. With the deep inventiveness of Ursula Le Guin and the quirky vitality of Annie Dillard, Sharona Muir seduces us into a cautionary world full of creatures, at once fanciful and utterly convincing, who hold unexpected lessons for ourselves.”

Robert Finch, author of A Cape Cod Notebook and co-editor of The Norton Book of Nature Writing

“Lock plays profound tricks, with language—his is crystalline and underline-worthy—and with time, the perfect metaphor for which is the mighty Mississippi itself.”

Publishers Weekly (starred and boxed review)

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“Lock’s work mines the stuff of dreams. . . . [In The Boy in His Winter] Huck Finn and Jim set forth down the Mississippi River and journey through a century and a half of American history, to alternatingly thrilling and horrific effect.”

Rumpus

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“A true American novel—in many ways as moving as Mark Twain’s original.”

CounterPunch

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“Hypnotic. . . .A delightful and profound journey.”

Flavorwire

“In this twenty-first century, there’s no one like Sharona Muir who can write, in bright accurate language, animals real or imaginary in an updated bestiary that riffs on evolution, extinction, and what it means to be human among other species. We need this view, and you’ll be right there with her on every page of Invisible Beasts.”

John Felstiner, author of Can Poetry Save the Earth?: A Field Guide to Nature Poems

“Lock has long been one of our country’s unsung treasures. . . . While Twain offered a panoramic skewering of his time, Lock reimagines the travels of Huck and Jim as a survey of the history and future of America. . . . Lock has made [Huck and Jim] not only fresh but new.”

Green Mountains Review

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“Norman Lock is a master of the unusual. Cast through his inimitable creative lens, [The Boy in His Winter] is much more than a unique concept. It’s a rich, textured story that’ll leave you unsteady on your feet, as any great water adventure should.”

Slice magazine

“To call [The Boy in His Winter] a work of fiction is to tell only part of the story. This book is as much a treatise on memory and time and the nature of storytelling and our collective national conscience . . . much of it wildly funny and extremely intelligent.”

Minneapolis Star Tribune

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“Boldly reimagines Huck Finn. . . . Striking and original. . . . The premise may be an outlandish brain-twister that takes risks with a sacred American myth, but the vessel stays afloat by virtue of [Lock’s] wily ingenuity.”

Atlanta Journal-Constitution

“[Lock] is one of the most interesting writers out there. This time, he re-imagines Huck Finn’s journeys, transporting the iconic character deep into America’s past—and future.”

Reader’s Digest

“Has all the elegant precision of a feat of architecture—or a wonder of nature. . . . The ties that bind us to our fellow invisible beasts are never simple or straightforward; they are, in fact, as unexpected as Muir’s endlessly inventive prose.”

Reading in the Growlery

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“At times laugh-out-loud funny . . . and sometimes sad and profound. . . . The animals featured in this book may be fictional, but the stories are strengthened considerably by the obvious scientific knowledge that underpins them.”

Magic Realism

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“Charming and inventive. . . . Sophie, through her whimsical and funny descriptions of her beloved creatures, offers us insights about love, sex, truthfulness, perspective, and the passage of time.”

Rosemary & Reading Glasses

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“The various fantastical beings presented here are described in careful scientific detail with results that are weird, whimsical, and somewhat unsettling. Like very fractured Just So Stories.”

Library Journal

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“Playfully and thoughtfully underlines the pain and loss of extinction . . . combin[ing] fact and imagination in 20 fables narrated by an amateur naturalist. . . . A marvelous capsule of natural history . . . not to mention crackling suspense.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“Lines blur between the human and animal worlds in this richly detailed debut. . . . In Sophie’s struggles to find her footing in a world only she and a few others can see, Muir expertly pinpoints the frailty of the human condition. This is an amazing feat of imagination.”

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

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“Full of language that is at once passionate and precise, flowery and full of information, [Invisible Beasts] is bursting at the seams with a strange duality, a dizzying mash-up of romanticism and science.”

Collagist

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“An erudite guidebook to the ‘animals’ that walk unseen among us.”

LitReactor

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“Make[s] Huck and Jim so real you expect to get messages from them on your iPhone.”

Scott Simon, NPR Weekend Edition

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“An absolute delight. . . . This smart, whimsical novel takes readers not only into a world of ‘invisible beasts’ but into the mind of a charmingly quirky character.”

EcoLit Books

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“Brilliant . . . this novel shimmers with glorious language, fluid rhythms, and complex insights. . . . The Boy in His Winter is a glorious meditation on justice, truth, loyalty, story, and the alchemical effects of love, a reminder of our capacity to be changed by the continuously evolving world ‘when it strikes fire against the mind’s flint,’ and by profoundly moving novels like this.”

NPR

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“Sensitive and elegant . . . funny and tender. . . . Beasts, a category used here in all its expansiveness, includes everything from the human to the microbe. This book is a wondrous testament to those relationships, interdependencies, and affinities. Invisible Beasts makes the bestiary a document of profoundly human dimensions, and offers to all readers, whether devotees of science or of fantasy, very real pleasures.”

io9

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“Brilliant. . . . With a light, witty, but heartwrenching touch, without preaching or hectoring in any form, Muir reveals, through the stories of her magnificent, funny, endearing invisible animals and their perils and extinctions, the anthropocentric obtuseness and mindless, casual as well as purposeful devastation of the environment and the mass slaughter of life forms, including ourselves, that puts all of us—animals, vegetables, and minerals—in dire peril.”

Women’s Review of Books

“At once a celebration of the power of imagination and a requiem for the species we’re losing every day. Both moving and often surprisingly funny, it’s a seductive work of speculative naturalism that has its hands in the dirt and its head in the clouds.”

Kenyon Review

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“An imaginative, delightful field guide to animals that seem to be visible to only a few people—including amateur naturalist and narrator Sophie. As her detailed descriptions of the fantastic creatures unfold, Sophie reveals a bit about human nature.”

Stanford Magazine

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“A wild and woolly hybrid that refreshingly defies classification. . . . Compelling throughout . . . it’s the literary lovechild of Lewis Carroll and Rachel Carson filtered through the lens of zoology’s godfather, Darwin himself.”

Bostonia

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“Vividly portrayed.”

Locus

“Wonderful and unusual. . . . [Invisible Beasts] is full of a sense of wonder, and has lyrical, passionate, and often funny descriptions of animals and the connections between people and animals.”

Orion Magazine

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“[An] imaginative menagerie comes to life in [Muir’s] novel Invisible Beasts.”

Sentinel-Tribune

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“Muir astounded this reader. Liltingly physical, metaphorically sound, elusively knowing, her language is paint and clay and vibration.”

Dublin Literary Award Longlist citation, Hartford Public Library

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“This environmental fable—as if Where the Wild Things Are had been written by Rachel Carson—is a lyrical field guide . . . as well as a commentary on extinction and being alive.”

O, The Oprah Magazine

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Invisible Beasts is a strange and beautiful meditation on love and seeing, a hybrid of fantasy and field guide, novel and essay, treatise and fable. With one hand it offers a sad commentary on environmental degradation, while with the other it presents a bright, whimsical, and funny exploration of what it means to be human. It’s wonderfully written, crazily imagined, and absolutely original.”

Anthony Doerr, author of All the Light We Cannot See and The Shell Collector

“BLP brings readers amazing books that defy easy categorization or mass marketing. If you want a good read, many publishers can offer that. If you want an amazing, transformative read that will settle down in your memory and open a dialogue with the best books you’ve read, a book that will challenge you to new levels of emotional and intellectual perception, a reading experience that might blow your heart open or change your worldview, go to the Bellevue Literary Press website and pick any book.”

Deb Baker, Bookconscious

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“Paul Harding had trouble finding a home for his debut novel, Tinkers. He signed with Bellevue Literary Press, a small publisher. . . . Then it won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize . . . These stories hearten struggling writers and everyone else who struggles too . . . These stories, finally, tell us that a healthy book industry is a diverse one . . . The more gatekeepers, the better.”

New York Times Editorial Board

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“[A] deftly constructed first novel . . . While writing about life’s dramas, Forbes refuses to overdramatize her material—making [Ghost Moth’s] revelations all the more powerful.”

Laurie Greer, Politics & Prose Bookstore (Washington, DC)

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“A beauty of a novel, Irish writer Michele Forbes delves deep into consequences of unrequited love.”

Stacey Lewis, City Lights Books (San Francisco, CA)

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“A commanding debut, packed with genuine characters, telling its story with powerful control. Ghost Moth is a beautiful book, by a wonderful writer.”

Frank McGuinness, twice Tony Award-nominated playwright of the New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award-winning play Someone Wholl Watch Over Me 

“A haunting story about love, yearning and loss that never fails to surprise or move the reader. This is a most impressive debut from a supremely talented writer.”

Christine Dwyer Hickey, author of Last Train from Liguria and Tatty

“A bountiful river of lovely images, fresh and perfect, a triumphant story both familiar and strange. A stellar debut.”

Sebastian Barry, Booker Prize-nominated author of The Secret Scripture and On Canaan’s Side

“Norman Lock once again proves himself a master storyteller . . . These stories are brilliantly imaginative and wonderfully unsettling.”

Largehearted Boy

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“This slow burning tale is both guileless and deeply—sometimes erotically—charged. The writing soaks up the world, and thrills to the beauty of it. Children, bees, milk, the sea, all are wonderfully rendered and alive on the page. Katherine Bedford—so ordinary and so passionate—is a heroine to treasure.”

Anne Enright, Booker Prize-winning author of The Gathering and The Forgotten Waltz

“A masterpiece . . . deeply thought provoking, filled to the brim with wit, and imaginative beyond belief, Love Among the Particles is a book for all who have ever dreamed and long to do so again.”

Akashic Insider

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“[Lock] is not engaged in either homage or pastiche but in an intense dialogue with a number of past writers about the process of writing, and the nature of fiction itself . . . taking a trope that seems familiar to readers of the weird but analysing it in the fiercest detail.”

Weird Fiction Review

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“Stories make their own realities, just as histories do, and Lock’s uniquely intricate understanding of this dynamic is what makes these tales so inimitable.”

Full Stop

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“Lock is a rapturous storyteller, and his tales are never less than engrossing.”

Kenyon Review

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“This fantastical collection of short stories is a joyous compendium of characters time-traveling through the annals of literary history—Mr. Hyde, Henry James, and Huckleberry Finn to name a few.”

Barnes and Noble Review

Ghost Moth is an impressive debut by a writer who is not afraid to address the so-called ordinary lives of real human beings. We shall be hearing a great deal more from Michèle Forbes.”

John Banville, Booker Prize-winning author of The Sea and Ancient Light

“Enticingly and enigmatically relevant for the present . . . these humorous, imaginative meditations on the nature of dreams, time, and space shimmer in their own darkness. . . . Reminiscent of the plays of Samuel Beckett, there is a wealth of insight here.”

Publishers Weekly

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“[Lock’s stories] are gems, rich in imagination and language. Readers will happily suspend disbelief, perhaps even finding particles of humor . . . And beyond the entertainment lie 21st-century conundrums: What really exists? Are we each, ultimately, alone and lonely? Where is technology taking humankind? For all their convolutions of space and time, these stories are remarkably easy to follow and savor.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

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“Clever, unpredictable, beautifully written and crafted—Ghost Moth stayed with me for a long time after I’d finished reading the final, sad, wonderful page.”

Roddy Doyle, Booker Prize-winning author of Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha and The Commitments

“Forbes’ prose is like a masterful painting you see at a museum: at first glance you may respond to the beauty, the color and texture, composition and themes. But the longer you look the more you realize the artwork is powerful, it’s both contained and expansive, incredible in and of itself, but also able to impact the way you feel . . . A terrific novel.”

Bookconscious

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“Lock’s writing is beautiful, with clean, clear, perfect sentences . . . seducing the reader with language and narrative into a fully realized alternative world to say something new about our own. . . . Love Among the Particles is topical, astonishing and provocative . . . a masterful collection.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers (starred review)

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“Intricate and lyrical . . . [Ghost Moth] mesmerizes readers, wrapping them lazily into the tale until there is no escape but by turning the final page.” —BookNAround

BookNAround

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Ghost Moth is a beautifully deceptive book. It feels light, ethereal, gentle and precious. Yet it deals with such momentous issues as religious intolerance, infidelity, illness, death. . . . Revelations come not with a bang, but with a whisper, mirroring life as it truly is rather than the drama we try to pull from it.”

LitStack

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“This debut novel by Michele Forbes begins with a great, menacing scene in choppy ocean waters. I was thoroughly hooked by [the] opening lines.”

Quivering Pen

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“Though this is Forbes’ first novel, Katherine is a sophisticatedly created heroine, perfect in her flaws, compelling in her lies, beautiful in her tragedy. . . . ‘What does love feel like?’ Katherine’s oldest daughter, Maureen asks. ‘Floating and burning,’ her mother replies. And like love, Forbes’ prose floats with captured emotion and burns with its vivid imagery.”

Late Night Library

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“What makes Ghost Moth such a compelling read is the individual characters . . . As literary heroines go, Katherine is quite ordinary; nonetheless, Forbes paints a vast and colorful tapestry of a life that is anything but. Ghost Moth is more than just a story of a woman torn between two men; it is a novel that anyone who has ever experienced a crisis of faith can identify with.”

Akashic Insider

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“A magnetic pull transcends the pages of [Love Among the Particles], making for a fully addictive collection.”

Slice magazine

“A powerful debut novel, one that brings to life 20th-century Ireland with lyrical precision, from the people to the landscape to the country itself.”

Largehearted Boy

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“Lyrical and beautifully written . . . [A] riveting family drama—concerned with the secrets, lies and hidden torments between those one is closest to, and the heartbreak of lost love.”

The Bookseller

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“Personal and political turmoil erupt in the life of Irish housewife Katherine Bedford during the summer of 1969 in Forbes’s powerful debut novel. . . . Through her richly imagined characters, Forbes depicts a fully human and flawed relationship between two people with their own desires, memories, and secrets.”

Publishers Weekly

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“Forbes debuts a gemlike novel. Rare and luminescent, her storytelling is deliberate in its unfolding. Readers will marvel at the subtle embroidering of folk stories such as the Selkie wife and Briar Rose into the Bedfords’s narrative. Fans of Anne Enright’s fiction will admire a similar brilliance in this work.”

Library Journal

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“Readers will revel in the skillful writing . . . complex plot . . . strong characterization . . . lyrical descriptions . . . Genre fans (Irish-history buffs, family-story readers, historical-fiction enthusiasts) will enjoy this novel, while its stylistic richness and narrative intricacy will also please readers of literary fiction. Highly recommended.”

Booklist (starred review)

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“A brilliant novel whose cast of characters, strong, strange, vivid, eccentric, will make you feel enriched and enlivened, and will leave you wanting to visit, or to visit again, the rich interiors of Tuscany past and present, the opulent mysteries of its food and wine, and not least the magic of its natural landscapes and seasons. Melissa Pritchard’s delicate and precise prose achieves all this, as if casually, while capturing her reader in the forward momentum of her story.”

C.K. Stead, author of Mansfield

“Excellent . . . [Forbes’] writing is precisely observed, understated, elegant, and the characters live off the page.”

Historical Novels Review

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“Exceptional . . . Forbes is a master of creating high tension and drama. . . . Ghost Moth is a compelling novel with a sharp emotional lens.”

Colorado Review

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“Melissa Pritchard stands out among contemporary writers for her ability to portray the complex inner lives of her characters. As we follow them through their experiences and memories into their dreams, we’re invited to flex our own imaginations, even, if we’re willing, to become more supple thinkers, thanks to this writer’s supple prose.”

Joanna Scott, author of Follow Me

“Forbes, who has already won major awards for her short stories, knows how to write—her prose is unfailingly elegant . . . [Ghost Moth] confirms its author as an exceptional talent.”

Belfast Telegraph & Irish Independent

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“In her subtle yet breathtaking new novel, Palmerino, Melissa Pritchard seduces us once again with her characteristically sensual and deeply poetic prose. Elegantly braiding time, this woven narrative is calibrated by Pritchard’s exquisite erotic reckonings and resonant aesthetic reflections. In resurrecting Violet Paget/ Vernon Lee at our own historical moment  (and by invoking a gallery of beloved and provocative artists and esthetes), Melissa Pritchard has provided for her readers a portrait-mirror in which to gaze—a glorious vision of both Palmerino and of a writer in pursuit of its history—one that would make even Oscar Wilde blush with envy.”

David St. John, author of The Auroras

“Beautifully written . . . Confident and lyrical. Michèle Forbes is a name to watch.”

Irish Examiner

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“Seduction is at the lush heart of Palmerino. The Florentine retreat seduces us just as surely as it seduces the lonely and abandoned Sylvia, an historical novelist who in turn is seduced by the spirit of the brilliant Violet Paget, who lived there a century earlier. Writing as Vernon Lee, Violet’s own seduction is one of the most quietly erotic scenes ever written.”

Pamela Painter, author of Wouldn’t You Like to Know

“Startling, gorgeous and memorable . . . Fans of family stories and historical fiction will enjoy this book immensely and the vivid, lyrical language will appeal to readers of literary fiction.”

Sunday Independent

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“A taut and elegant imagining of Vernon Lee’s life that sparkles with Einfühlung for the writer, for Italy and for the love—wild, unconsummated, shattered—that lies at the heart of the best creative work. Weaving fact and fiction, past and present, Palmerino becomes its own beautiful mirror, a work that ‘slips free of the self’ to reveal the mysterious other. Sublime and moving, its gorgeous prose haunts the reader long after the last page.”

Ana Menéndez, author of Adios, Happy Homeland!

“Forbes’s exquisite writing keeps Ghost Moth fresh and moving. This is a terrific novel, and like everything I’ve read from Bellevue Literary Press, it’s one that will stay with me.”

Concord Monitor/Concord Insider

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“Bounding between Italy today and of a century ago, a breathtaking gallop through intellectualism, feminism, sexuality, cultural history, honeysuckle, focaccia, plums, language, landscape, love, the supernatural, metafiction, mortality and resurrection, with Pritchard always firmly at the reins.”

Anne Korkeakivi, author of An Unexpected Guest

“Evocative . . . Forbes’ writing is lovely.”

Minneapolis Star Tribune

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“This lovely, sexy novel provides a sumptuous glance into the secret lives of artists. At its center is Violet, a fierce woman who never met a rule she didn’t break. Melissa Pritchard’s voice is completely her own and her characters are as unique, wild and magical as she is.”

Tayari Jones, author of Silver Sparrow

Palmerino finds Melissa Pritchard’s signature style in peak form. Pritchard is a writer of sensibility. Her unique gift is the ability to interweave the resonances of consciousness—memory, intelligence, emotion—with those of a historical time and a powerful sense of place, so that character emerges as a coherent, credible, internal voice uttering a sensual flow of language, both lush and precise.”

Stuart Dybek, author of The Coast of Chicago

“A Belfast-born actress with experience in film, theater, and television, Forbes draws from her own professional and personal background to imbue her protagonist with authentic energy and humanity . . . deftly explor[ing] the private and public struggles of this particular Catholic family with vivid, poetic language. . . . By the end, the truth—the brutal and the beautiful—rises to the surface of this eloquent novel.”

Boston Globe

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“At the heart of Palmerino lies beauty, grace, longing, love. Melissa Pritchard’s picturesque prose is fertile, sensuous, a voice of insight, truth. Unique and refreshing as ‘the great female soul that is Palmerino.’ Gorgeous and heartbreaking. This book is a sensual treasure.”

Kim Chinquee, author of Pretty

“Dazzling in its descriptions, lush and lyrical in language, Palmerino is a jewel of a novel. It is a tale to be savored like a rich Italian pastry. Melissa Pritchard’s characters—eccentric, quirky, and brilliant—will live on in the heart and mind long after the last crumb is licked from the plate.”

Naomi Benaron, author of Running the Rift

“A fascinating homage to the power of thought and writing.”

River City Reading

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“An alluring journey.”

Read Lately

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“A fascinating, unexpected way to enter into Vernon Lee’s life. Highly recommended.”

Rosemary & Reading Glasses

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“Pritchard skillfully blends the past and present in her novel Palmerino, a book both richly lyrical and highly imaginative.”

Largehearted Boy

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“Rarely has a novel based on real people reached such deftly crafted literary excellence as this historical work of fiction clearly documenting Melissa Pritchard as a writer equal to any of the people populating her superbly presented story. Palmerino is a complex and entertaining novel that is highly recommended for personal reading lists and community library literary fiction collections.”

Midwest Book Review

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“Vibrant, passionate and absorbing. . . . Recommended.”

Historical Novels Review

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“Lush, tactile descriptions and impressionistic scenes bring alive this historical novel . . . cast[ing] Paget and her late nineteenth-century lifestyle in a captivating light.”

 

ForeWord Reviews

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“A supernaturally infused, innovative story . . . Pritchard’s fertile imagination and presentation give new meaning to the expression ‘a meeting of the minds.’”

Kirkus Reviews

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“Enthralling . . . An intriguing introduction to Violet Paget, and an unusual look into the mysteries of writing.”

Booklist

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“Fiction can reimagine flesh-and-blood folks to stunning effect . . . What a pleasure, then, to discover Melissa Pritchard’s Palmerino, which envisions the life of Vernon Lee, the pen name and male persona of Englishwoman Violet Paget. Opening with the contemporary story of Sylvia, who discovers Lee while working at Villa il Palmerino in the Italian countryside and becomes her biographer, this work is related in sun-on-raindrops prose that draws in readers.”

Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal Book Expo America Editor’s Pick

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“Haunting, seductive, and magical.”

GayRVA.com

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“A fascinating historical novel. . . . A mesmerizing love story. . . . Magnificent.”

Connotation Press

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“The achingly gorgeous prose in which Palmerino is written strikes pitch-perfect harmony with its equally strong expression of humanity, promising that the hidden beauty within is always worth the time it takes to discover it.”

CCLaP: Chicago Center for Literature and Photography

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“In a mere 192 pages, Melissa Pritchard has created a rich, lush, and riveting story of two women writers in different eras.”

Shelf Unbound

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“[Palmerino] draws its life from its large and vivid characters. . . . With her signature hothouse lyricism and psychological acuity, Pritchard carries us fully into her created world.”

Image: Art, Faith, Mystery

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“Melissa Pritchard has opened the door to understanding a once famous British lesbian writer. . . . Palmerino is a beautifully written and well-structured work.”

Gay & Lesbian Review

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“A novel of allure . . . as fanciful as Astrid Lindgren’s Villa Villakula and foreboding as The Eagles’ “Hotel California,” Palmerino is surprising at every turn, sometimes frightening, and above all beautiful.”

Lambda Literary

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“Part love story (or stories), part treatise on aesthetics, part mysterious tale of the supernatural, Palmerino [is] a tale of multiple seductions.”

Phoenix New Times

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“Slim and poetic . . . the mood is of thunderstorm air thick with loneliness and longing.”

National Post

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“A richly imagined, sensuous tale of a British writer holding court in Italy, flouting Victorian mores via her writing and her sexuality.”

O, The Oprah Magazine

“Lynne Jones is an internationally-known expert on the effects of war on children. Her description of the legacy of the savage war in Bosnia is a shattering but necessary read. . . . This book should be in the knapsack of every international administrator.”

Brendan Simms, author of Europe: The Struggle for Supremacy

“Human rights investigations tend to produce snapshots at the moment of abuse. Rarely do we have occasion to look at the aftermath. Lynne Jones adds the dimension of time. With remarkable insight and sensitivity, she follows a group of young Bosnians from both sides of the Serb-Muslim conflict as they grow up. We see how they try to cope with, comprehend, and transcend the horrors that their elders have visited upon their communities. Their successes and failures deepen our understanding of human resilience and how people rebuild their lives from tragic circumstances.”

Kenneth Roth, Executive Director, Human Rights Watch

“One of the most illuminating books to have emerged out of the embers of the Bosnian war. Few outsiders have acquired such an inside knowledge of the thoughts and feelings of ordinary Bosnians, on both sides of the wartime divide.”

Noel Malcolm, author of Bosnia: A Short History and Chairman of the Bosnian Institute in London

“Lynne Jones brings to the extreme situation she describes a truly unique combination of hands-on communally oriented psychiatric help; sensitive research on the impact of war and upheaval on children; and an astute sense of the interplay of political policies and psychological behavior. . . . The book not only deepens our understanding of what happened in the former Yugoslavia but contributes greatly to our more general grasp of the consequences of death, loss, and dislocation, and the stubborn human persistence in the face of them.”

Robert Jay Lifton, author of The Nazi Doctors: Medical Killing and the Psychology of Genocide and Witness to an Extreme Century

“Part narrative, part analysis, part thoughtful reflection, this book belongs among the classic accounts of children and war.”

Jennifer Leaning, M.D., S.M.H., Harvard School of Public Health

“Profound . . . Rarely do we get the opportunity to delve into the thoughts of the young caught up in such a tragedy—and meet them not just once in their lives but again years later. This is a moving, well written and above all, deeply disturbing book.”

Tim Judah, Europe correspondent for Bloomberg World View, Balkans correspondent for The Economist, and author of The Serbs: History, Myth and the Destruction of Yugoslavia

“Psychiatrist Lynne Jones, working in Bosnia’s Goražde in 1996, discovered a striking puzzle: most children exposed to the extreme trauma of bombing, rape, or ‘ethnic cleansing’ were emotional, but not ‘mentally ill.’ Written with an engaging style by a caring doctor with unique experience in setting up clinics in conflict zones, Jones describes children in this Muslim town, detailing how their interpretation of trauma protected them or rendered them vulnerable. Careful to be balanced, she also listened to the Serbian children in the neighboring town, and revisited these children on both sides of the conflict years later. This remarkable book not only contributes to social history—including our understanding of the genocide in Srebrenica—but also to psychiatry. Her astonishing work challenges the medical model in understanding human responses to cruelty.”

Simon Baron-Cohen, Professor of Developmental Psychopathology, Cambridge University, and author of The Science of Evil: On Empathy and the Origins of Cruelty

“Thought-provoking and readable.”

 

Library Journal

“This young author’s book immediately caught my interest for its narrative mastery and remarkably skillful identification with the complex atmosphere of the interbellum era . . . [A] brilliant novel.”

Ivan Klíma, Franz Kafka Prize-winning author of Waiting for the Dark, Waiting for the Light and My Crazy Century

“Absorbing . . . offers new insights into Bosnian Serb–Muslim relations through the eyes of children.”

Publishers Weekly

“Beautifully written, absorbing, and impeccably researched.”

Zuzana Justman, Emmy Award-winning writer and director of Voices of the Children

“Careful, sensitive . . .  a deeply intimate look into the emotional makeup of children of war.”

Kirkus Reviews

“Out of the horror of human cruelty in the Bosnian war comes a bright note.”

Foreign Affairs

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Aaron’s Leap takes you on an epic journey, which is also a very intimate and personal story—entertaining, touching and brutally honest. Her characters are full of compassion and tenderness, but are never sentimental. It’s a great book.”

Agnieszka Holland, Academy Award-nominated writer and director of Europa Europa and guest director of HBO’s The Wire and Netflix’s House of Cards

“Beautifully illustrates the way in which people (in this case children) actively engage with the experience of war . . . Highly original.”

Times Literary Supplement

“A Czech novel about art, death and sex set against the backdrop of the Holocaust and never-ending war . . . The reader comes to connect with and care for [Platzová’s] characters as more than mouthpieces for history.”

Kirkus Reviews

“Platzová’s prose is as sharp and effective as the angles of an expressionist monument. . . . [A] powerfully elegiac novel.”

Publishers Weekly

Then They Started Shooting upends the traditional discourse on the victims of war by continuing the narrative long after the violence has ended. The stories in this book are eloquently and poignantly recounted, and offer a vital, complex portrait of what the long road to peace looks like.”

Dinaw Mengestu, author of The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears and How to Read the Air

“A moving, humane tale of life lived in history’s long shadow.”

Booklist (starred review)

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“This book will amaze you as it walks you through evolution, history, mythology, and a good dose of anatomy, to enlighten you about the role of the Humble Human Foot in bringing human beings to where we are today. Thoroughly enjoyable, informative, and well written, it is a must read for anyone involved in caring for our lower extremity—or interested in our evolution. In short, you will never view the foot the same way again.”

Gary Stones, DPM, President, New York State Podiatric Medical Association

“Art and modern thought are at the center of [Platzová’s] characters’ lives and they find ways to seek truth through art, love, and friendship, inviting the reader to join them on this journey of self-discovery.”

Jewish Book Council

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“Among the many pleasures of this book are the intriguing subject, Carol Ann Rinzler’s lively and accessible writing style, and the amazing array of information she has gathered from so many different fields . . . Who knew that the story of our own feet could be so fascinating?”

Sandra Opdycke, author of No One Was Turned Away and Jane Addams and Her Vision for America

“Just as a well-curated collection of art has the ability to capture the zeitgeist of a given era with great economy, [Aaron’s Leap] manages to position the reader in a present that is informed by the distinct motifs of the past.”

Necessary Fiction

“Carol Ann Rinzler weaves together material from art, literature, science, and history to broaden our understanding of the human foot. Her book is by turns entertaining, enlightening, and altogether satisfying.”

Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney

“Dr. Reicher’s memoir tells a gripping, tragic, unforgettable tale that, like Wladyslaw Szpilman’s The Pianist, recounts the horrors of being a Jew in Poland during World War II. This important historical document distinguishes itself from other Holocaust narratives in many ways, but perhaps in none more so than this: its perseverant hero not only saved his wife and daughter but helped bring one of the most notorious Nazis of all to justice.”

Austin Ratner, Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature-winning author of The Jump Artist and In the Land of the Living

“[Aaron’s Leap] takes us on a journey through the turbulent times of wars, revolutions, and new directions in art. . . . The novel is beautifully written, with masterful creation of atmosphere and sculpting of the main characters.”

World Literature Today

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“A riveting first-hand account of the destruction of the Warsaw Ghetto. Edward Reicher presents events from the perspective of a Jew, a physician, a survivor, a chronicler, a husband but mainly a humanitarian caught in the flux of horrific events that, but for memoirs such as this, would fade with the absolution of time. Reicher’s astonishing book insures that will not happen.”

Arthur L. Caplan, Ph.D., Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Chair Director, Division of Medical Ethics, NYU Langone Medical Center and author of When Medicine Went Mad: Bioethics and the Holocaust

“Carol Ann Rinzler has written a surprising and delightful book about this ‘underwhelming, underreported, and completely indispensable’ part of the human body. It’s amazing what you’ll learn!”

Richard N. Gottfried, Chair, New York State Assembly Health Committee

“This neat little book draws a clear picture of our feet, providing understanding that extends far beyond the obvious. Readers often like to walk away from a book feeling they learned something—that the author left them with a new way to look at an old idea, and this book fulfills that need.”

City Book Review

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“Entertaining and wide-ranging. . . . Well researched and clearly presented.”

Literature, Arts and Medicine Database

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“Stylish, informative, entertaining, and pleasantly personal . . . Whether Rinzler is exploring how our feet explain or illuminate such topics as evolution, disability, racism, diet, or desire, she maintains a fascinating perspective on the peculiarities of being human.”

Rain Taxi Review of Books

“Recounts the story of how Edward Reicher, a distinguished prewar dermatologist and venereal disease specialist escaped the Lodz and Warsaw Ghettos with his wife and young daughter. While on the surface Reicher’s memoirs describe the many disguises and hiding places he and his family used in order to avoid the Gestapo and Polish Blue Police, the deeper message of this work concerns the almost universal ‘moral failure’ that permeated the non-Jewish Polish population.”

Jewish Book Council newsletter and The Jewish Voice

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Country of Ash is not only a tribute to strength, determination, and fortitude, but a tribute to all of the Jewish victims of the Holocaust. It is a tribute to those who were not Jewish, yet did strive to offer a place to hide and offer food to Reicher and/or his family. It is a memoir that honors Reicher’s daughter, Elisabeth Bizouard-Reicher’s determination to see her father’s memoir in print for all the world to read . . .  [It is] a brilliantly written account.”

Jewaicious

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“Told in clear and beautiful prose, Aaron’s Leap is a deeply moving portrait of love, sacrifice, and the transformative power of art in a time of brutal uncertainty.”

Simon Van Booy, author of The Illusion of Separateness

“An in-depth look at the anatomy and history of feet reveals their often overlooked importance in human evolution, medicine and art.”

Science News

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“A riveting account of the will to survive.”

Midwest Book Review

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“What makes this diary so powerful is that Reicher dwells on very little—for it is all so crazy—and tells the facts and his story with dispatch, so that we are so caught up in events that we begin to feel as if we are living them with him, that we have somehow been dropped into a Beckett or Ionesco play where absurdity at its most extreme is reality. . . . We can give thanks to all who worked to bring Country of Ash into our lives, then read it with care, and heed its warnings.”

Arts Fuse

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“A moving memoir, a finely crafted and beautifully written story.”

World Literature Today

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“Stirring”

Forward

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“Rinzler lifts the lowly human foot to new heights in this appealing book.”

Booklist (starred review)

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“Edward Reicher recorded his Holocaust nightmares from the ghettos of Lodz and Warsaw to the chilling attempts for his family to live as Aryans in a world of blackmail, informants and circumcision checks. . . . ‘This book has no literary pretensions,’ he writes. ‘It is the description of the life of a Jewish doctor who survived the worst years.’ Yet it’s far more than that . . . Country of Ash is worth reading because the riveting survival drama is framed by larger questions.”

Minneapolis Star Tribune

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“It’s the rough texture of Reicher’s tale—like grainy celluloid from a bygone era—that gives such a powerful, deeply disturbing immediacy to the ghetto inhabitants he remembers. Reicher tells us they’re no more, but he is wrong. Their ghosts still walk in books like this one—haunting the reader, forever.”

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

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“[Dr. Reicher] lived through the Second World War in Poland, dodging bullets, uprisings and deportations—not to mention betrayal, starvation and airless hideouts—in a manner more reminiscent of a talented outlaw than a mild-mannered dermatologist . . . It is the impressive simplicity of the good doctor’s writing that makes [t]his book resemble [Victor] Klemperer’s, and the detailed observations of its report that makes it emotionally memorable. . . . William Carlos Williams once said that people who prize information are perishing daily for want of the information that can be found only in poetry. By the same token, there will never be a time when we will not need the information that an important, evocative book like Country of Ash provides.”

Moment magazine

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“This book is a jewel of reserve, delicacy, precision and, in the end, of love.”

L’express (Switzerland)

“Implacable precision, with a stylistic density that brings out the most moving elements of humanity.”

La vie (France)

“A novel with the strength of a stifled cry.”

Le temps (Switzerland)

“A flawless black diamond . . . luminous.”

L’Hebdo (Switzerland)

“[Lock] has an impressive ability to create a unique and original world.”

Brian Evenson, author of Immobility and Windeye

“A knock-out.”

Madame Figaro (France)

“All hail Lock, whose narrative soul sings fairy tales, whose language is glass.”

Kate Bernheimer, editor of My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me and Fairy Tale Review

“You need to read Pascale Kramer’s books because they take you on a journey. You board a small ship that enters the human body, and what you felt while reading follows you for days after you’ve closed the book.”

Elle (France)

“A singularly moving and disturbing novel about the ambiguity of feelings.”

Le Monde (France)

“No other writer in recent memory, lives up to [Whitman’s] declaration that behind every book there is a hand reaching out to us, a hand to be held onto, a hand that has the power to touch us, to make us feel.”

Detroit Metro Times

“Kramer’s family portrait is a somber one . . . [an] unindulgent presentation of a world with no illusions.”

Complete Review

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“[Lock’s] window onto fiction [is] a welcome one: at once referential and playful, occupying a similar post-Borges space to the short stories of Stephen Millhauser and Neil Gaiman.”

Vol. 1 Brooklyn

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“One could spend forever worming through [Lock’s] magicked words, their worlds.”

Believer

“Kramer is too accomplished a novelist to spoon-feed the reader adult-sized fairytales . . . life itself is comprised of death, of disease, of a boy’s rotten teeth and a lover’s disintegrating body. As a boy grows old and corrupt so does a beloved city and civilization. Life itself has its limits, and so does love.”

Full Stop

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“[A] contemporary master of the form [and] virtuosic fabulist.”

Flavorwire

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The Child is a raw look at the cycles of decay that stalk our lives—the violent deterioration of a low-income neighborhood, the physical degradation of a cancer-wracked body—and the unexpected sources of hope that keep us going.”

World Literature Today

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“Intense and bravely uncompromising. An adult study of pain, thwarted affection, and guarded privacies in a world at the edge of violent public breakdown. An impressive achievement.”

David Malouf, author of Ransom: A Novel and The Happy Life: The Search for Contentment in the Modern World

“Our finest modern fabulist.”

Bookslut

“Weissmann has a strong and well-informed interest, unusual for a scientist, both in poetry and in art.”

Freeman Dyson, author of The Scientist as Rebel and Maker of Patterns

“Dr. Weissmann’s juggling with the balls of global politics, biology, medicine, and culture in the framework of history is breathtaking.”

Bengt Samuelsson, Nobel Laureate and former chairman of the Nobel Foundation

“The premier essayist of our time, Gerald Weissmann writes with grace and style…”

Richard Selzer

“How I envy the reader coming upon Dr. Weissmann’s elegant, entertaining essays for the first time!”

Jonas Salk

“Weissmann is Lewis Thomas’s heir.”

Robert Coles

“The most brilliant and humorous manifesto ever written by a scientist against the current cult of unreason: a must for the educated layman!”

Jean-Pierre Changeux, author of The Good, the True, and the Beautiful

“Weissmann models his work after that of his mentor, Lewis Thomas . . . his ideas . . . are every bit as important.”

Publishers Weekly

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“Erudite, engaging, and accessible.”

Library Journal

“[Weissmann] is a Renaissance Man. . . . He’ll stretch your mind’s hamstrings.”

Christian Science Monitor

“Weissmann is a master of the essay form. His witty and elegant prose makes the toughest subject matter not only accessible but entertaining.”

Barnes and Noble Review

“Weissmann writes a complex kind of essay, part Rebecca West in his startling yoking of disparate matters . . . and part Lewis Thomas.”

Harper’s

“He writes as a doctor, a medical scientist, a knowing lover of art and literature and a modern liberal skeptic. But more than anything else, Weissmann writes as a passionate and wise reader.”

New Republic

“As a belles-letterist, Weissmann is the inheritor of the late Lewis Thomas . . . Like Thomas, he’s a gifted researcher and clinician who writes beautifully. Unlike Thomas, he is an original and indefatigable social historian as well.”

Boston Globe

“[Weissmann] is a man of wide culture, a captivating and graceful writer.”

New Yorker

“Oliver Sacks, Richard Selzer, Lewis Thomas . . . Weissmann is in this noble tradition.”

Los Angeles Times

“Weissmann introduces us to a new way of thinking about the connections between art and medicine.”

New York Times Book Review

“A Guatemalan literature professor named Eduardo Halfon (postmodern coincidence?) searches for his origins throughout the world in this slim, haunting novel. Through stories of a gypsy Serbian pianist, Israeli travelers, and his Jewish grandfather, Eduardo seeks to understand how exile, his own and others’, has shaped his identity, and how people cope with the yearning for a homeland that they’ve never had.”

Shane, WORD (Brooklyn, NY)

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“[Weissmann] bridges the space between science and the humanities, and particularly between medicine and the muses, with wit, erudition, and, most important, wisdom.”

Adam Gopnik, author of Paris to the Moon and The Table Comes First

“Halfon’s book is one that I just keep thinking about and wondering about. It’s not possible to describe it neatly other than to say that it’s shape-shifting and without one genre and written beautifully.”

Hans Weyandt, Micawber’s Books (St. Paul, MN) in an interview with Caroline Leavittville on the titles he finds himself “pressing into everyone’s hands these days”

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“An absolutely first-rate writer.”

Kurt Vonnegut

“Highly entertaining! Highly recommended!”

Susan, Mrs. Dalloway’s (Berkeley, CA)

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“God, I loved this book from the first page to the last. It is deeply moving, imaginistic, achingly real and yet thoroughly enigmatic. Each experience while sharply told escapes easy meaning and yet sets us up in wonder—how was that so we ask? Halfon cares so much for his story and those who inhabit it that we simply want to squeeze his hand and say thank you, this book is a gift, a marvel.”

Sheryl Cotleur, Copperfield’s Books in Northern California’s Sonoma County

“America’s most interesting and important essayist.”

Eric Kandel, Nobel Laureate and author of The Age of Insight

“Eduardo Halfon belongs to a new generation of Latin-American writers who, from the beginning, demonstrate an impeccable mastery of their craft, without any hesitation in the use of language.”

Sergio Ramírez, former Vice President of Nicaragua and author of Margarita, How Beautiful the Sea

“It is not often that one encounters such a mix of personal engagement and literary passion, or pain and tenderness.”

Andrés Neuman, author of Traveler of the Century

The Polish Boxer is an enchanting, unclassifiable book of encounters, impressions, and improvisations: a book for the ages, which can be read in one sitting, and then again, and again, and again.”

Christopher Merrill, director of the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa and author of The Tree of the Doves: Ceremony, Expedition, War

The Polish Boxer is the most memorable new novel I have read all year—the voice pitch-perfect, the imagery indelible. What a wonderful writer.”

Norman Lebrecht, author of The Song of Names

“Eduardo Halfon’s prose is as delicate, precise, and ineffable as precocious art—a lighthouse that illuminates everything.”

Francisco Goldman, author of Say Her Name

“Eduardo Halfon is a brilliant storyteller, whose gifts are displayed on every page of this beautiful, daring, and deeply humane book.”

Daniel Alarcón, author of War by Candlelight and Lost City Radio

“I can’t remember the last time a book made me cry . . . ”

North of the 45th Parallel one-minute audio book review on Washington’s KTRT fm

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“As much a novel as Jennifer Egan’s A Visit from the Goon Squad . . . easily as good as what’s been published in the fiction section of The New Yorker.”

BookSexy Review

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“Masterful . . . infused with sensitivity, humor, touching moments, magical prose, and illuminating stories.”

Book Diva

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“Only a mind as nimble and well traveled as Gerald Weissmann’s could see, never mind make and expound on, the connections between salamanders and Prohibition . . . white blood cells, Hollywood and erectile dysfunction . . . health care reform and Marie Antoinette . . . bacteria, the Equal Rights Amendment and the “Miracle on the Hudson.” Better yet, Weissmann does so with wit and insight. A fascinating tour through history, science and pop culture.”

Dr. Max Gomez, Emmy Award-winning WCBS-TV Medical Correspondent

“Get yourself to your local bookstore or your library and ask for Eduardo Halfon’s The Polish Boxer. Get comfortable . . . Pour yourself a drink. Put on some music—jazz, gypsy, or whatever inspires your heart to longing. And enjoy this magical, unreal trip through reality.”

Bookconscious

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“Intertwine[s] the profound connections of science and art in the context of our modern era. . . . Weissmann also does a fantastic job of highlighting the role of women in both the arts and sciences. . . . Each essay provides its fair share of wit and satire, poignantly illustrating faults or curiosities in current scientific thought or public discourse of the scientific realm.”

Science

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“Like a memoir by Anthony Bourdain mixed with tones of Kerouac . . . The Polish Boxer is sexy; it’s moving; it’s a little bit in the gutter, but it’s looking up at the stars.”

Insatiable Booksluts

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“Erudite energy leaps from this lively commingling of art, culture and science. . . . In each [essay], Weissmann finds links between research and elements of history and pop culture, which play off each other to illuminating effect.”

Nature

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“A revelation . . . The Polish Boxer is a book of small miracles. . . . For sheer narrative momentum and fascination with the mix of life and books, sex and art, there are echoes of the Chilean master Roberto Bolaño.”

Words Without Borders

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“The tales are spellbinding, the prose is magnificent, and several parts will make you laugh out loud.”

Gozamos

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The Polish Boxer immediately seduced me; on the first page, I felt the spark of recognition that comes from reading something with actual depth and import.”

Full Stop

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“Halfon’s curiosity about his grandfather’s experience in a concentration camp burns through every chapter from the most subtle level to deep investigation . . . He has succeeded in warping a modern Balkan mystery into a Holocaust memoir . . . intrinsically blend[ing] fiction with reality in a deeply visceral way.”

Rumpus

“Once again, Gerald Weissmann, with a firm and easy knowledge of everyone who matters from Auden to Zola, bridges the space between science and the humanities, and particularly between medicine and the muses, with wit, erudition, and, most important, wisdom.”

Adam Gopnik, author of Paris to the Moon and The Table Comes First

“In Galileo’s Gout, Gerald Weissmann . . . bemoans the onrushing darkness and then sets to chronicling individual explosions of light. . . . Throughout, Weissmann weaves evidence of political regression with details of memorable scientific discoveries, as well as occasional medical case histories of relevant literati. . . . [Galileo’s Gout] also serves as a compact guide to the highlights of American medical innovations.”

Washington City Paper

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“[Weissmann] has emerged in the last three decades as America’s most interesting and important essayist. He has achieved this status both epigenetically and through Twitter, word of mouth, so to speak. . . . Much like Susan Sontag, Weissmann likes being a contemporary, and does not feel shackled by tradition. . . . This book is a joy for the heart and instructive for the mind.”

Eric Kandel, Nobel Laureate and author of The Age of Insight

“A brave and touching and dead stylish examination of the nature of fiction, truth and lies.”

Dazed & Confused

“Eduardo Halfon has been deemed one of the best young Latin American writers by the Hay Festival of Bogota; read his first work to be translated into English, The Polish Boxer, and you’ll see why.”

Shelf Unbound

“In the simplest explanation, The Polish Boxer is a series of encounters for literature professor Eduardo—with a young poet, university professors at a Mark Twain conference, his grandfather, his charming girlfriend, who draws her orgasms, and Milan Rackic, a Serbian-Gypsy pianist. In the more complex explanation, it is a journey of self-discovery.”

ForeWord Reviews

“[A] popular refuge for well-regarded authors. . . . At a time when publishers increasingly see books as products and need to be convinced of their chances of selling at least 25,000 copies, Bellevue Literary Press thinks smaller and aims higher.”

Gale Scott, Crain’s New York Business

“I can’t pretend to know the future of publishing, but I can testify to the astuteness of the staff at Bellevue Literary Press.”

Karen Long, Cleveland Plain Dealer

“Bellevue Literary Press . . . must be lauded for its prescience in publishing.”

Joan Frank, San Francisco Chronicle

“This is a press that knows good books.”

Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal

“Brilliant . . . opens with one of the best classroom scenes I’ve ever read.”

Shelf Awareness for Readers

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“Highly readable and engaging . . . provides readers food for thought about the nature of literary creations.”

Library Journal

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“These are the stories of life . . . the question of survival (of both people and cultures) and the way the fictional makes the real bearable and intelligible.”

Publishers Weekly (boxed review)

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“Halfon passionately and lyrically illustrates the significance of the journey and the beauty of true mystery. The Polish Boxer is sublime and arresting, and will linger with readers who will be sure to revisit it again and again.”

Booklist (starred review)

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“This book provides multiple pleasures: clear, intense prose; sharp, laugh-out-loud depictions of classrooms and conferences . . . and the apparent seamlessness of the translations . . . . The book itself gives a resounding retort to those who might dismiss it as ‘another’ book ‘about’ the Holocaust.”

Jewish Journal

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“Beautiful and provocative . . . a wonderful read which begs to be re-read.”

Jewish Book World

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“A mix of finely nuanced prose and humor.”

World Literature Today

“[The Polish Boxer] exists in the no-man’s-land between fiction and memoir. In the end, we decide, this is fable: only the stories are important.”

Guardian

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“Tight and lean . . . falling somewhere between the novels of Roberto Bolaño, WG Sebald, and Junot Díaz.”

Telegraph

“Stimulating and inspiring.”

Independent

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“This globe-trotting novel digs into mysteries of the past and present.”

San Francisco Chronicle, “Top Shelf” Recommendation from Bay Area independent bookstore Mrs. Dalloway’s

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“A professor mentors a student, gains wisdom from a Mark Twain scholar and searches for a Gypsy musician, and that’s only part of the story in this incredible, achingly real yet enigmatic novel.”

San Francisco Chronicle, “Top Shelf” Recommendation from Bay Area independent bookstore Copperfield’s Books

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“Deeply accessible, deeply moving.”

Los Angeles Times

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“Elegant.”

Marie Claire

“The hero of Halfon’s novel delights in today’s risible globalism, but recognizes that what we adopt from elsewhere makes us who we are.”

New York Times Editors’ Choice citation

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“Engrossing . . . The Polish Boxer by Guatemalan novelist Eduardo Halfon, is a semi-autobiographical tale about roots and origins, identity and cultural loss, and the complex relation between the individual, his or her family story, and the heavy burden of History . . . Short but intense.”

NBC Latino

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“Fantastic . . . Intense pain and beauty are offset by an unabashedly boyish sense of humor; in the same page, Halfon can skillfully switch from a discussion about intense immigrant alienation to a hilarious observation on the short male attention span for pornography.”

NPR Alt.Latino

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“A Borgesian, post-Communist-era, comic detective noir.”

New York Review of Books

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“Funny and revelatory.”

New York Times Book Review

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“You draw in a deep breath. Your day has been hectic. You feel overwhelmed and are longing for a simple moment where life will just stop. You pick up a book and begin reading. Your quiet comes. The words rest on the page, pulling you into the lives of each character. Suddenly your day melts away and you no longer care about yourself—you are transported. This is what it’s like to read Inukshuk.”

Melissa Opel, Auntie’s Bookstore (Spokane, WA) @ NW Book Lovers

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“A powerful tale of a father and son struggling through despair and loss.”

Jason Kennedy, Boswell Book Company (Milwaukee, WI)

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“A stunning achievement.”

Robert Whitaker, author of Mad in America (from the Foreword)

“An incredibly honest account of a relationship between a father and a son after their wife and mother left them. . . . Spatz does a superb job finding a balance between the vivid descriptions of the main characters’ imaginary worlds and the moments of acute awareness they both have of their painful situation. A very convincing and beautiful novel.”

Pierre Camy, Schuler Books & Music (Grand Rapids, MI)

The Lives They Left Behind is a tour de force, a must-read for anyone concerned with social justice, human rights and historical reclamation. Darby Penney and Peter Stastny brilliantly rescue ten people who spent time at Willard State Hospital from certain historical anonymity and silence by giving them voice to speak for themselves. Their riveting accounts invite us to explore the turmoil and strengths of their inner terrain while mourning the erosion of hope after years of captivity and inhumane treatment in the name ‘help’ and under the guise of ‘best interest.’ The Lives They Left Behind is more than a testament to the past, it is a wake up call to our collective conscience, to uphold the spirit and dignity of all human beings.”

Laura Prescott, President and Founder, Sister Witness International Inc.

“A unique and mesmerizing evocation of lives erased . . . at once unnerving, heartbreaking, and a bitter testament to an era in psychiatric history whose legacy is all too present today.”

Gail A. Hornstein, Ph.D., author of To Redeem One Person Is to Redeem the World: The Life of Frieda Fromm-Reichmann

“One of the most innovative and unusual fictional incarnations I’ve ever read of the persistent allure of Sir John Franklin’s final, fatal Arctic voyage. It’s a remarkable accomplishment.”

Russell Potter, author of Arctic Spectacles

“In unpacking the prior lives stored in these suitcases, Darby Penney and Peter Stastny turn remembrance into an act of alchemy.”

Kim Hopper, Ph.D., author of Reckoning with Homelessness

“As we have yet to provide a full measure of support and treatment to men and women diagnosed with mental illnesses, The Lives They Left Behind offers a sobering reminder of past tragic errors, lest, in our search for new therapies, we lose sight of what should matter most: our sense of common humanity.”

Drew Days III, Alfred M. Rankin Professor of Law at Yale Law School, former Solicitor General in the Clinton Administration and Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights in the Carter Administration

“At its heart Inukshuk is about family. But Spatz has transfigured this beautifully told, wise story with history and myth, poetry and magic into something rarer, stranger and altogether amazing. A book that points unerringly true north.”

Karen Joy Fowler, author of The Jane Austen Book Club and Wit’s End

“Darby Penney and Peter Stastny have . . . performed an important service, reclaiming these individuals from the nameless, faceless fate of being only ‘mental patients.’”

Judi Chamberlin, author of On Our Own: Patient Controlled Alternatives to the Mental Health System

“An important and profoundly moving story. . . . The exquisite details we learn about the patients’ lives—the color of lace on a dress, a plea to a bishop, the photo of a wife who died—convey the particulars of their humanness, their strengths, and their tragedies, and a chapter revealing sad and frightening parallels between long-ago and current treatment of many people called mentally ill should shock us all into action.”

Paula J. Caplan, Ph.D., author of They Say You’re Crazy: How the World’s Most Powerful Psychiatrists Decide Who’s Normal

“Gregory Spatz’s prose is as clean and sparkling as a new fall of snow.”

Janet Fitch, author of White Oleander and Paint it Black

“No reader will walk away untouched by these compelling portraits.”

Ronald Bassman, Ph.D., author of A Fight to Be: A Psychologist’s Experience from Both Sides of the Locked Door

“[Spatz offers] what I look for in any book: people I can dream myself into and be remade in the process.”

Dorothy Allison, author of Trash and Bastard Out of Carolina

“A gifted writer.”

NPR All Things Considered

Inukshuk is a feat of empathy and honesty, a taut tale of fear and resentment and other threats from within, meticulously observed and fearlessly rendered in vivid, authoritative, gripping prose. It’s a virtuoso performance.”

Doug Dorst, author of Alive in Necropolis and The Surf Guru

“You can almost feel the chill of the arctic . . . a great weaving together of history and fiction.”

Two Weeks from Everywhere

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“Entertaining and much recommended.”

Midwest Book Review

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“A powerful indictment of healthcare for the mentally ill.”

Publishers Weekly

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“This enthralling, tense book should lure not only fans of extreme weather novels but also those who admire a good, traditional structure and a satisfying and meaningful resolution.”

NewPages

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Inukshuk better communicates darkness and distress than any S.O.S. signal. . . . We can’t help but oscillate between feeling empathy and agony for this family as we are absorbed by Spatz’s cold, gripping tale.”

ZYZZYVA

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“Thomas, bullied at school, confused by love (with a delightfully original girl), pining for his mother, and distrustful of his father, takes control of the only thing he can—his physical survival. . . . A frozen lullaby . . . written for teens left behind.”

Bookslut

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“This book should be required reading for anyone who struggles with the treatment of mental illness in community settings.”

New England Journal of Medicine

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“Lockhart has written an important, and eloquent, lamentation and exultation: he laments about the state of math education today, but exults in the hope that teachers might be inspired to invite students to experience mathematics as the exciting ‘poetry of ideas’ that it truly is.”

Barry Mazur, Gerhard Gade University Professor, Harvard University and author of Imagining Numbers (particularly the square root of minus fifteen)

“A mesmerizing story of a father and a son.”

Largehearted Boy

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“This brief and elegant celebration of mathematics is a charming rant against the way you and I learned the subject.  Is painting just coloring in numbered regions?  Is the sunset just a list of wavelengths and a compass setting?  No more, Lockhart argues, than mathematics is just definitions and formulas.  To put back play and joy in our mathematics classrooms, he shows, all we need do is restore the real mathematics.”

Robert P. Crease, author of The Great Equations: Breakthroughs in Science from Pythagoras to Heisenberg

A Mathematician’s Lament is a fascinating argument that anyone interested in mathematics education should read.  I promise that they will enjoy the experience, whether they agree with all that Lockhart writes or not.”

Bryan Bunch, author of The Kingdom of Infinite Number: A Field Guide

“Intimate and meditative . . . A thoughtful and sympathetic look at the sometimes troubled relationship between fathers and sons.”

Booklist

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“Exact, haunting prose tells the story of a boy obsessed with Arctic explorer Sir John Franklin after his mother abandons the family.”

Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal Best Indie Novels of the Year citation

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“An elaborate tale of family and the paths people take to understanding.”

Seattle Times

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“An excellent work of scholarship. . . . Cassidy tells this story with nuance and passion.”

Mark Walker, author of German National Socialism and the Quest for Nuclear Power, 1939-49 and Nazi Science

“[This] mix of well-researched history and contemporary fiction makes for a fine, sad read.”

Minneapolis Star Tribune

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“Cassidy has written the definitive biography of a great and tragic physicist.”

Richard Rhodes, author of the Pulitzer Prize–winning The Making of the Atomic Bomb

“Shadowed by the Inuit word for stones resembling ‘a human form,’ a marker to reassure that ‘Someone was here,’ Spatz portrays a discordant family crippled by emotional and physical distance. . . . This tale of familial dysfunction is carefully interwoven with the historical retelling of Sir Franklin’s quest, resulting in a layered journey that is hauntingly honest and emotionally resonant.”

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

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“[The authors] spent 10 years piecing together a handful of poignant biographical narratives, tracking down medical records, talking to former staff and using artifacts from the suitcases as clues to the lives these patients lived before they were nightmarishly stripped of their identities.”

Newsday

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“A must read book about key players in science and world history.”

Gerald Holton, research professor of physics and history of science, emeritus, Harvard University, and author of Einstein, History, and Other Passions and coeditor of Einstein for the 21st Century

“In their poignant detail the items helped rescue these individuals from the dark sprawl of anonymity.”

New York Times

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“Provides a fresh way of thinking about math, and education in general, that should inspire practical applications in the classroom and at home.”

Publishers Weekly

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“An excellent follow up on Cassidy’s earlier masterwork Uncertainty. Cassidy offers deep insight into Heisenberg’s role as a principle founder of quantum mechanics and as the leading German physicist during the WWII years in the quest for atomic energy and weapons.”

Benjamin Bederson, physics professor emeritus, New York University, editor-in-chief emeritus of the American Physical Society, and Manhattan Project member

“Fascinating. . . . The haunting thing about the suitcase owners is that it’s so easy to identify with them.”

Newsweek

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“Exhaustively detailed yet eminently readable, this is an important book.”

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

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“Jonathan D. Moreno quietly continues to be the most interesting bioethicist of our time. He is without peer in appreciating the subtle but important role of bioethical discourse, conflict, and consensus within our society.”

American Journal of Bioethics (AJOB)

“If you want to read one book to get up to speed on evolution, read Written in Stone.  Switek’s clear and compelling book is full of fascinating stories about how scientists have read the fossil record to trace the evolution of life on Earth. In it, you will read how dinosaurs gave rise to birds, how small deer-like land animals evolved into whales, and how many types of horses, elephants and early humans once roamed the Earth. In short, you will see how scientists through the ages have figured out man’s place in nature.”

Ann Gibbons, author of The First Human

“Brian Switek proves himself a compelling historian of science with Written In Stone. His accounts of dinosaurs, birds, whales, and our own primate ancestors are not just fascinating for their rich historical detail, but also for their up-to-date reporting on paleontology’s latest discoveries about how life evolved.”

Carl Zimmer, author of At the Water’s Edge and The Tangled Bank: An Introduction to Evolution

“It is hard not to be awed reading Brian Switek’s magisterial Written in Stone.  Part historical account, part scientific detective story, the book is a reflection on how we have come to know and understand ancient events in the planet’s history.  Switek’s elegant prose and thoughtful scholarship will change the way you see life on our planet. This book marks the debut of an important new voice.”

Neil Shubin, Professor and author of Your Inner Fish

“Brian Switek’s Written in Stone is a wonderful journey through the fossil record, and the people and events that have shaped our understanding of fossils and their meaning. He weaves in entertaining anecdotes about the scientists and their discoveries (impeccably researched and up-to-date in historical detail) with our current view of these creatures, utilizing all the latest discoveries from new fossils to molecular biology. After reading this book, you will have a totally new context in which to interpret the evolutionary history of amphibians, mammals, whales, elephants, horses, and especially humans.”

Donald R. Prothero, author of Evolution: What the Fossils Say and Why it Matters

“In Written in Stone, Brian Switek simultaneously depicts our place in Nature while capturing the flavor of discovery and understanding our remote past in the fossil record. Elegantly and engagingly crafted, Switek’s narrative interweaves stories and characters not often encountered in books on paleontology—at once a unique, informative and entertaining read.”

Niles Eldredge, author of Darwin: Discovering the Tree of Life

“Highly instructive . . . a warm, intelligent yeoman’s guide to the progress of life.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“In delightful prose, [Switek] . . . superbly shows that ‘[i]f we can let go of our conceit,’ we will see the preciousness of life in all its forms.”

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

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“Switek seamlessly intertwines two types of evolution: one of life on earth and the other of paleontology itself.”

Discover Magazine

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“[Switek’s] pithy accounts explain how the fossils … came to be discovered and interpreted . . . [an] excellent book.”

Wall Street Journal

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“In this thoroughly entertaining science history, Switek combines a deep knowledge of the fossil record with a Holmesian compulsion to investigate the myriad ways evolutionary discoveries have been made…It’s poetry, serendipity, and smart entertainment because Switek has found the sweet spot between academic treatise and pop culture, a literary locale that is a godsend to armchair explorers everywhere.”

Booklist

“A beautifully scrupulous, intricately detailed novel about joy and despair, anti-Semitism and assimilation, and like a great photograph, it seems to miss nothing, and to catch its subject in all his complexity.”

Charles Baxter, author of The Feast of Love and The Soul Thief

“After reading The Jump Artist, I was overwhelmed by Austin’s talent as a novelist …[he] has written a compelling, must-read book whose subject matter has universal appeal, especially in these troubling times.”

Deedra Dolin, The Mandel JCC Festival of Jewish Books & Authors

“Ratner’s brilliant first novel . . . presents a fascinating tribute to the ‘jump artist’ through the prism of a dark and horrific time in European history.”

Cleveland Jewish News

“The book is a beautiful, if dark, psychological portrait of a man suffering under the weight of his own doubts, as well as the world events that have deeply personal consequences for him.”

Cedar Rapids Gazette

“Ratner weaves a psychologically arresting fiction from these facts, imagining the creep of Nazism in 1928 Europe.”

Cleveland Plain Dealer

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“Ratner uses a historical figure to discuss the trepidations felt throughout a Europe aware that the future was unknowable yet around the corner. It is this confusion, on an individual and collective level, that allows the novel to transcend the bounds of historical fiction. Ratner describes the era well, but his more substantial achievement is in the creation of a character that history already knows.”

Booklist

“Ratner. . . vividly depicts his character’s ordeal and amazing recovery from the trauma of the event.”

The Morning News

“Fortunately, in Ratner’s hands, all this material is transmuted into engaging fiction, not pedantic reportage. The novel’s protagonist feels like a thoughtful presence; we understand the historical material through Philipp’s perspective, which is well measured, complicated, convincingly dark.”

The Rumpus.net

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“Ratner knows how to use rhythms and metaphors to evoke a sensory, psychologically grounded reality that writers with vastly more experience than him would envy.”

The Jewish Daily Forward

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“A remarkable work.”

Harper’s Magazine

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“This elegantly-written tribute makes as beautiful a use of the darkness and light of one man’s life, as a Halsman photograph of a pretty young woman.”

GQ

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“Mark Podwal’s original drawings on current events in the fields of both politics and medicine reflect his great talent; endowed with insight and beauty they acquire the weight of personal commentary.”

Elie Wiesel, author of Night

“Mark Podwal is one of those startling souls — they are very few — who can imagine, through the power of a unifying eye, connections so new that they shake the brain into fresh juxtapositions of understanding.”

Cynthia Ozick, author of The Din in the Head

“Mark Podwal is in every sense an illuminator.”

Harold Bloom, author ofShakespeare: The Invention of the Human

“Mark Podwal’s Doctored Drawings is plain brilliant! Podwal is like no one else that I know of, and his work will withstand the test of time.”

David McCullough, author of 1776 and John Adams

“To read Understories is to lose oneself on a spelunking expedition and stumble across a subterranean library sprouted from the Earth’s core. You’ll thank me for this one.”

Lydia, Brookline Booksmith (Brookline, MA)

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The Lives They Left Behind is a deeply moving testament to the human side of mental illness, and of the narrow margin which so often separates the sane from the mad. It is a remarkable portrait, too, of the life of a psychiatric asylum—the sort of community in which, for better and for worse, hundreds of thousands of people lived out their lives. Darby Penney and Peter Stastny’s careful historical (almost archaeological) and biographical reconstructions give us unique insight into these lives which would otherwise be lost and, indeed, unimaginable to the rest of us.”

Oliver Sacks

“Explores the connective tissue between the practice of medicine and literature in a way that is sensitive, surprising, and compassionate.”

NewPages.com

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“Part of a national trend in medical education for schools to use literature to teach doctors how to write better and clearer case histories and to emphasize more with patients.”

The New York Times

“The nation’s most venerable public hospital and physician training ground has turned to literature to help its doctors better understand their patients, and themselves.”

The Washington Post

“A high quality magazine…one of the few journals that celebrate the creative results of incorporating writing into the practice of medicine.”

Poets & Writers

“A kaleidoscope of creativity…unsentimental and sometimes unpredictable.”

Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)

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“Varley O’Connor’s The Cure is a moving, beautifully written, character-driven novel about a compelling couple and their children living in rural New Jersey in the thirties.  The book captures the dangerous intersection between private life and the forces of history — the crises of the post-depression years, the war, polio epidemics, racial prejudice — and gives the reader that rare pleasure of inhabiting another family life that feels at once entirely familiar and new.”

Susan Richards Shreve, author of A Student of Living Things and Warm Springs

“In this poignant and well-told novel, Varley O’Connor inhabits the fragile lives that unravel in the face of illness and disease.  But, as with all wonderful writers, this is just the beginning for this tale ripples into one of race and class. Part period piece, part family saga, The Cure is a particularly American story and an achingly beautiful one at that.”

Mary Morris, author of The River Queen

“A sustained tenderness and rare emotional sympathy for all her characters infuse Varley O’Connor’s latest novel, her best. The Cure is fresh and engaging from author’s commanding literary skill, her imaginative control of the historic details, and her marvelous feeling for the fragility of family dynamics.”

Phillip Lopate, author of Waterfront

“This sublimely written novel takes on large issues such as illness, race, family relations, and the varieties of human love. Honesty and compassion inform every page, and there are passages so musical and full of grace they read like hymns. Reading groups should rejoice at this book.”

Sigrid Nunez, author of The Last of Her Kind

“Nangle looks at the suffering body with a concentration that yields almost hallucinatory detail. What she writes is a stunning realism like no one else’s, explosively quiet, painful, and beautiful.”

Jaimy Gordon, author of Bogeywoman

The Leper Compound succeeds remarkably in giving a sense of how, during the last years of white rule in southern Africa, the daily experience of ordinary people was interfused with the larger historical drama.”

J.M. Coetzee, Nobel Laureate for Literature and author of Slow Man

“…a beautiful and complex work.”

Los Angeles Times

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The Leper Compound interweaves the study of a historic moment with a lovely depiction of one African girl’s development as affected by that moment.”

San Francisco Chronicle

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The Leper Compound will … remain with the reader long after the book has been closed.”

Stuart Dybek, author of I Sailed with Magellan

Science Next illustrates the profound connections between science and the many facets of our society. I have enjoyed hop-scotching through the book, and others who are concerned about the need for evidence-based policies in government and industry will too.”

Harold Varmus, Nobel Prize-winning author of The Art and Politics of Science

Science Next addresses important topics in science policy in prose that is beautifully written, clear, and to the point.”

Marion Nestle, PhD, MPH, Paulette Goddard Professor of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health at New York University and author of Food Politics and What to Eat

Science Next is exactly the book we need, with more provocative ideas per ounce than any volume you are likely to read this year.”

Michael Pollan, author of In Defense of Food

“This elegant book lucidly covers an impressive amount of territory and sheds light on the current horizons of science. As such it will be invaluable to informed citizens, scientists and policy makers alike.”

John Kao, chairman of the Institute for Large Scale Innovation and author of Innovation Nation

“I’m excited about Science Next because in its pages I sense visions of the future that combine knowledge with a concern for justice, marrying what we can be intellectually with what we can be morally. Innovation is not simply the abstract victory of knowledge; it is not just the research that gave me years to live; the next science can advance human flourishing and serve the common good. That’s the kind of world I want to leave for my children, and for yours.”

Elizabeth Edwards, author of Saving Graces: Finding Solace and Strength from Friends and Strangers

“Despite subsidized Big Oil, infrastructural collapse, food inspection system failures and ever worsening wildfires, this volume brings hope into focus with reports of innovation that will enhance lives, from caregivers to those running out of fresh water, from No Child Left Behind to university research.”

Publishers Weekly

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“Fascinating, clear-headed, optimistic, and lucidly written, Mind Wars makes a compelling yet nuanced case for scientific progress in the area of neurology enhancement and for the transparent collaboration of the academy and the military.”

Sally Satel, M.D., author of PC, M.D.: How Political Correctness Is Corrupting Medicine and Resident Scholar at American Enterprise Institute

“Few people ever think about brain research as a national security discipline. This intriguing and provocative book lays out how neurotechnologies for brain analysis, repair and enhancement can be multi-purpose and serve both good and nefarious functions. Moreno forces the reader to think about the possible dangers and the accompanying ethical issues that co-occur with the great potential benefits of accelerating neuroscience advances.”

Alan I. Leshner, Ph.D., American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) CEO and Science Executive Publisher

“The revolution in neurosciences is drawing increasing attention from ethicists, public policy experts and the general public. But, one aspect of that revolution has elicited little notice or comment—how those charged with ensuring the national security and the military dominance of their nations will utilize the growing understanding of the human brain to achieve these ends. The paucity of attention to this crucially important topic is now over. Mind Wars presents the science, outlines the potential applications of it for military and national security purposes, and sounds exactly the right cautionary warnings about where the enormously powerful merger of brain sciences and biodefense might go. This will certainly be the source book on the ways in which neurobiology may rewrite the rules of warfare, spying and intelligence collection in the twenty-first century.”

Arthur L. Caplan, Director of the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania

“One of the most important thinkers describes the literally mind-boggling possibilities that modern brain science could present for national security.”

Lawrence J. Korb, former US Assistant Secretary of Defense

“Raises serious social and policy questions . . . deserves a wide readership.”

CHOICE

“Renowned bioethics authority Moreno travels to the nexus of brain science, engineering, and national security to explore the connections between neuroscience research and national defense agencies. . . . Given the topic’s provocative nature, this is recommended for all science and bioethics collections.”

Library Journal

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“Crisply written . . . praiseworthy.”

Publishers Weekly

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“The world we encounter in Mind Wars is like the world in [Philip K.] Dick’s A Scanner Darkly.”

Conspiracy Times

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“A fascinating and sometimes unsettling book. . . . Any academic involvement in military research presents an ethical dilemma, and Moreno’s exploration of this theme is one of the most interesting aspects of the book.”

Nature

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“An exhilarating and anxiety-provoking whirlwind tour of recent developments in neuroscience that possess defense or national security potential . . . groundbreaking.”

American Journal of Bioethics (AJOB)

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“More than a serious work of public policy, the volume is a son’s quest to understand the work of his psychiatrist father, who pioneered lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) experiments in the 1960s . . . Moreno deserves credit for having the courage to go where no bioethicist has gone before. His philosophical forays into mind-brain questions are learned, and his narrative about the rise of big science and the ‘garrison state’ represents a provocative historical synthesis. . . . Mind Wars is not the last word on this fascinating, frightening, and potentially transformative corner of neuroscience and neuroethics. But it is the first.”

Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)

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“Fascinating and frightening.”

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

“Even-handed and thought-provoking. [Mind Wars] is very readable, and easily accessible to people without a background in neuroscience.”

Neurophilosophy at the Guardian (UK)

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“Quietly provocative . . . Moreno takes an evenhanded, thorough look at how deeply the intelligence and defense communities are involved in many of those advances and the mindfields that might lie ahead.”

Cleveland Plain Dealer

“There has been virtually no debate on the ethical questions raised by the brave new brain technologies. . . . The time to speak up is before the genie is out of the bottle.”

Wall Street Journal

“An excellent work in its comprehensiveness and accuracy, and in its success in recreating the personal drama of one of the greatest and most influential scientists of this century.”

Times Higher Education

“Searing and pointed. . . . An easy, thoughtful, and entertaining read. . . . [Lockhart’s] passion makes the critique compelling.”

Notices of the American Mathematical Society

“Horvath’s stories simultaneously stimulate the intellect while being fantastically imaginative. 
Contemporary urban life is examined through the looking glass, twisted slightly but still entirely recognizable and relatable. His images imprint, linger and the characters balance on the fine edge of what is real and what is imagined. This is memorable stuff.”

Stacie M. Williams, Boswell Book Company (Milwaukee, WI)

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The Body Politic is required reading for anyone who wants to understand the history of American political thought about science, the dynamics of current controversies such as the stem cell debate, and the battle between those who see science as the route to a better future and those who see within the science the potential for a loss of our sense of human distinctiveness and dignity.”

Paul Wolpe, Ph.D., Director, Center for Ethics, Emory University and Chief of Bioethics for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

“A beautiful book.”

Jay Schulkin, Ph.D., Research Professor, Department of Neuroscience, Georgetown University

The Body Politic reminds us that science occurs within a complex context that exerts powerful forces upon scientists, public officials, advocacy groups, and patients. Moreno has written the kind of book that needed to be written, combining detailed research, enlightened analysis, and an important message, all wrapped in accessible text.”

Eric M. Meslin, Ph.D., Director, Indiana University Center for Bioethics

“Moreno clarifies major points of science-society tension over the last half century and brings a sharp eye to the societal context confronting future advances and their applications.”

Alan I. Leshner, Ph.D., American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) CEO and Science Executive Publisher

“Provides a fascinating, timely exploration of one of our era’s most momentous issues, the applications—and misapplications—of biomedical research.”

John Horgan, author of Rational Mysticism and Director, Center for Science Writings, Stevens Institute of Technology

The Body Politic is a penetrating and uncommonly fair-minded analysis of how science is construed, nourished, and antagonized across the rainbow of American thought and belief. Highly recommended for all those who would base their political opinions on facts, rather than on other people’s opinions.”

Timothy Ferris, journalist, PBS filmmaker and author of The Science of Liberty: Democracy, Reason, and the Laws of Nature

“This groundbreaking must-read book situates the biological revolution in its historical, philosophical and cultural context and, with almost breathtaking elegance, shows how society may come to define itself by the body politic.”

Nita A. Farahany, Associate Professor of Law & Associate Professor of Philosophy, Vanderbilt University; Member, Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues

“A new wave of issues is coming at us—genetic testing, brain scans, synthetic biology, consumer eugenics—and radically challenging our notions of left and right. Jonathan D. Moreno has written a clear-eyed map of the emerging biopolitics—greens, transhumanists, bioconservatives, technoprogressives—and a thoughtful defense of inquiry, innovation, and the liberating power of science.”

William Saletan, author of Bearing Right: How Conservatives Won the Abortion War and Slate National Correspondent

“Since the beginning of our quest to win the Indianapolis 500 our family has believed in the power of technology. The only limits to that technology have been human ones. The Body Politic reminds us that in biology as well as engineering, America will always need that pioneer spirit.”

Al Unser, Sr., Al Unser, Jr., Bobby Unser, Sr., Indianapolis 500 Champions

“Moreno shrewdly tracks the history of science in American politics from Thomas Jefferson to today’s science culture wars. He explains how science and discovery have been central to our vision for the country, but often fueled a significant counter reaction. A must read for anyone who wants to understand science policy today.”

John Podesta, former White House Chief of Staff and President and CEO of the Center for American Progress

“A solid addition to any politics collections.”

Midwest Book Review (reviewer’s choice)

“Historians will agree that ‘progress’ is as American as apple pie. What constitutes progress, of course, is always a point of contention. In The Body Politic, Jonathan D. Moreno examines the attitudes Americans hold about modern science’s treatment of the human body. . . . Throughout the discussion, it’s clear he has his thumb on the cultural and historical contexts in which these issues have arisen [and] Moreno explains that people on both sides of the aisle are expressing concern for unrestricted use of bioscience for different reasons . . . an excellent addition to any syllabus.”

ForeWord Reviews

“A concise but nuanced account of Enlightenment and post-Enlightenment debates about the role of science in American life.”

CHOICE

“Moreno shows how biological discoveries aggravate cultural tensions, challenge our political system and values, and stimulate debate about the place of science and scientists in America. . . . Sophisticated, useful, and well-written.”

Library Journal

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“An important analysis of the societal currents swirling around volatile scientific issues . . . Moreno delivers a powerful defense of science [and] respects his readers’ intelligence in this nuanced and thoughtful book.”

Publishers Weekly

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“Moreno pulls apart the debates on eugenics, abortion, end-of-life decisions, embryonic stem-cell research, reproductive cloning, chimeras, and synthetic biology, among others, carefully reassembling what’s at stake for each side. In graceful, sparkling prose, he illuminates intricate threads of history and complex philosophical arguments. . . . Highly recommended for anyone interested in the[se] vital issues.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

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“Erudite and sophisticated . . . provide[s] a historical and philosophical framework to enrich present bioethical debates.”

Real Change

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“Scholarly, sophisticated and compelling . . . If only more of our contemporary political battles were as careful, as cogent and as well grounded as The Body Politic, I’d be more confident that the unprecedented decisions being forced upon society by revolutionary advances in biology would most wisely and effectively be made.”

Washington Independent Review of Books

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“Human cloning. Synthetic biology. Mood (and mind) altering drugs. Personalized medicine . . . The human future may be very different from the human past as these changes are negotiated and assimilated. And so may human politics. To help us prepare for this radical future is Jonathan Moreno, author of the new book The Body Politic: The Battle Over Science in America, which underscores the strange bedfellow allegiances that may occur in what has been called our ‘biological century’.”

Point of Inquiry

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“The most penetrating characterization and analysis of the shrill political battles fought over the use of our new biotechnologies (and the battles to come).”

American Journal of Bioethics (AJOB)

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“A timely take on the debate raging over biotechnology breakthroughs . . . Moreno shows how developments in biotechnology have affected people across the ideological spectrum. . . . conservatives concerned about abortion, neoconservatives worried about threats to human dignity and liberals fretting that new biotechnologies will exacerbate existing economic inequality.”

Nature

“Regardless of who ends up occupying the White House in January 2013, one hopes that a few hours will have been set aside on the campaign trail to engage with this important book.”

Times Higher Education

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“An impassioned defense of scientific study . . . an essential dose of logic.”

Salon

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“Every passionate reader lives for that first page of a book that alerts her, straightaway, she’ll be sorry when the book ends. So it is with Michelle Latiolais.”

Antioch Review 

“Widow is a hymn to reverence, simultaneously heartbroken and celebratory. Michelle Latiolais has given us the rarest item, a splendidly articulated masterpiece.”

William Kittredge, author of Hole in the Sky and The Nature of Generosity

“There is something mysterious about this book, as there always is in the writing that matters most. It eludes explanation. It illumines terrifying realities. Only because these pages seem nakedly willing to take the imprint of every emotion, no matter how ugly, do they possess this great beauty.”

Elizabeth Tallent, author of Honey

“In this luminous collection of stories, the gifted Michelle Latiolais writes of loss in all its surprising manifestations. Widow is a devastation and a wonder.”

Christine Schutt, author of All Souls

“Totally original . . . the book maintains its sense of literary savoir faire to the end.”

New York Journal of Books

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“Every story in this collection is uniquely enjoyable.”

Shelf Awareness

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“Latiolais uses the finest details to weave strands of hope.”

ForeWord Reviews

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“All who venture here will discover some very fine writing.”

Library Journal

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“A master of banter, Latiolais is happily bawdy and gorgeously sensual. She is also archly imaginative and psychologically astute.”

Booklist

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“A truly excellent collection of short stories, the best I have read in a long time . . . There is an emotional vitality to them, a clarity of insight, a sense for the ridiculous and the poignant that make them simply truthful and engaging.”

Lit Love: Tales from the Reading Room (UK)

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“Intimate and charged . . . [Latiolais] revels in words and in language, and while saturated in loss, grief, and longing, her prose is also fiercely humorous, angry, sexual, and alive.”

Three Guys One Book

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“Latiolais is not only a good observer of human nature, but a fearless one. It takes a certain bravery to make stories of loneliness, of sadness, of reminiscences, and of contemplation enjoyable to read.”

Lancette Arts Journal (Canada)

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“As humans face death – our own or our most beloved – the best writers have the ability to rise up and eloquently sing. I speak, of course, of Joan Didion in The Year of Magical Thinking, of Francisco Goldman in Say Her Name, of David Vann in Legend of a Suicide. And now, Michelle Latiolais takes her place in that very top tier of talented writers. . . . [Widow] positively pulsates with pain and beauty, with heartbreak and reverence, with alienation and survival. In short, it is stunning writing, courageous writing.”

MostlyFiction

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“All is certainly not gloom and doom in these imaginative tales . . . Widow is an enjoyable read, especially since Latiolais is such an accomplished lover of the written word. Though the stories amply reflect the shattering and paralysing loss of widows, they are not depressing.”

Belletrista: Celebrating Women Writers from Around the World

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“Latiolais is bold and frank, and utterly unsentimental. . . . Widow rivets our attention because it offers what all literature, tragic, comical or otherwise, should: a distillation of experience and a concentration of thought that invests a simple moment with all the profundity of existence itself.”

ZYZZYVA

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“Excellent, heartbreaking . . . reading Widow was a profound experience. . . . [Latiolais] takes the ordinary and shows how it doesn’t exist. There is only the great mystery of the moments of our lives, which can at best turn into vivid memories. And after that? It is that afterlife, the after of all those mysterious, precious moments, that soaks this book. Death, something so final, still remains the unanswerable question that follows our lives, and Latiolias ponders this beautifully, painfully, honestly.”

Nervous Breakdown

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“For the intimate ways that it explores the recesses of grief with warmth, earthiness, and humor, Widow is the most emotionally resonant book I’ve read this year.”

Open Letters Monthly

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“A short story collection whose writing gives us pleasure in just being in the company of the writer.”

OC Weekly (Required Orange County Reading)

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“Latiolais has a supple, sensitive way with words. . . . [Widow] celebrates the Geiger counter aspect of human consciousness that records and overwrites a deep document of self-reflection.”

OC Metro magazine

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“There is poetry in Latiolais’s prose. Charged by memory and the frisson of association, these stories revel in the texture of words, their sounds, their vagaries, their betrayals. . . . offer[ing] pearls rough, mottled, shimmering.”

Los Angeles Review of Books

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“Filled with an intensity of vision . . . Latiolais plunges courageously into odd territory, noticing and observing the felt life in precise and often beautiful language.”

Minneapolis Star Tribune

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“This is an elegant book of stories, precise and glittering, like jewels. Latiolais writes exquisite, mandarin prose, in sentences you want to memorize.”

Roxana Robinson @ National Book Critics Circle’s Critical Mass

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“Latiolais writes about grief in such a raw way—she joins the general pantheon of No-More-Husband literature (high priestess: J-Did), but her style is so unique as to be another genre altogether.”

Rachel Syme @ The Millions

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“The inveterate readers among you may be asking yourselves, do I read this book or Joyce Carol Oates’ book of stories about widows and her recent memoir about widowhood? And I say to you, read them all, but begin first with Michelle Latiolais.”

Alan Cheuse, NPR’s All Things Considered

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“Sublime . . . [Latiolais] manages to find something luminous in the broken shards—still sharp, still drawing blood—that remain in the wake of losing what could not feasibly be lost.”

San Francisco Chronicle 

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“Latiolais is as close to Alice Munro as a writer can get, but with a more modern edge to her tone, low graceful notes, not too much flash, perfect restraint and the feeling of contents under pressure.”

Los Angeles Times

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“Bracing, exposed, ruthlessly mercurial . . . The writing thrums with aggression and a lush, rooted sensuality . . . the rewards here are enormous.”

New York Times Book Review

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“Pulse[s] with a surprising, offbeat erotic energy.”

Elle

“Autism and grief acquire powerful and enigmatic reality as the reader turns the pages of A Proper Knowledge. To invoke one of its own metaphors, this novel is a refuge, not because it elides trauma or sorrow, but because it confronts them with gallant and unswerving clarity. A thousand things are noticed in this novel that you won’t have seen in fiction before. Don’t be fooled: for all the delicacy of its language this is a work of burning ferocity.”

Elizabeth Tallent, author of Honey

“The novel courts—in elegant and sometimes elegiac prose—the shadowy and elusive opportunities for redemption.”

Ron Carlson, author of Five Skies

“An elegant and engaging novel of beauty and pain, and how one will often reveal the other. Precise, insightful, lovely.”

Aimee Bender, author of Willful Creatures

“In prose shimmering with intelligence and compassion, Michelle Latiolais dissects the essentials of everyday life to find the heartbeat within. [Her work] reveals an author with that rare eye which is at once both clinical and poetic.”

Alice Sebold, author of The Almost Moon and The Lovely Bones

“Every passionate reader lives for that first page of a book that alerts her, straightaway, she’ll be sorry when the book ends. So it is with Michelle Latiolais’ astonishing, sparklingly intelligent new novel…. The work strives, with bold zest, to arrive at the marrow of things…. Latiolais triumphs, folding the work’s clinical ruminations into the story’s delicious batter. Powerfully recommended.”

Antioch Review

“Some of [Hayes’s] most memorable writing describes the dissection classes he attended in San Francisco. We are treated to a selection of fascinating anatomical snippets…”

Nature

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“With prose both lucid and arrestingly beautiful . . . Hayes pays eloquent tribute to two masterpieces: the human body and the book detailing it.”

Publishers Weekly

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“One of those rare authors who can tackle just about any subject in book form, and make you glad he did.”

San Francisco Chronicle

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“Hayes moves nimbly between the dour streets of Victorian London…and the sunnier classrooms of a West Coast university.”

The New Yorker

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“All laud and honor to Hayes. In perusing the body’s 650 muscles and 206 bones, he has made the case that we are…’fearfully and wonderfully made’ and that dissection has an aesthetic all its own.”

The Washington Post

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“Hayes searches for the elusive man behind the great reference work and his own scalpel’s-eye tour of the human body.”

The New York Times Book Review

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“A wonderful writer, Bill Hayes tells the multi-layered story of the two extraordinary young men who produced the most famous medical text of all time—a turning point in medical history, and a continuing influence and inspiration for artists, doctors and anatomists a century and a half later. Part memoir, part biography, part guided tour into the marvels of the human body, The Anatomist deserves a place on every bookshelf.  And if you do not already have a copy of Gray’s Anatomy, Bill Hayes’s remarkable account will surely inspire you to get one.”

Oliver Sacks, author of Musicophilia

“[An] excellent discussion of science, society, and the influence of the individual scientist.”

Physics Today

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“Tim Horvath is a wonderful writer. There’s a musicality to his prose. It’s evident that he enjoys the way words can sound on the page. His debut short story collection from Bellevue Literary Press reminds me a bit of Kevin Brockmeier, in the sense that both writers combine wordplay with speculative fiction.”

Michele Filgate, Community Bookstore (Brooklyn, NY) @ Vol. 1 Brooklyn

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“A page-turner.”

American Scientist

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“‘The Understory’ is a terrific reach through history from the pre- and post- Nazi era in Germany up to the present. . . . This is a wonderful story, a first-rate creation by a fine writer.”

Bill Henderson, president and editor of Pushcart Press, in his judge’s statement for the Raymond Carver Short Story Award

“Intimate and keenly observed, [The Sojourn] is a war story, love story, and coming of age novel all rolled into one. I thought of Lermontov and Stendhal, Joseph Roth and Cormac McCarthy as I read. But make no mistake. Krivak’s voice and sense of drama are entirely his own.”

Sebastian Smee, Pulitzer Prize–winning art critic

“Gorgeous. . . . Lockhart is passionate, contagiously so.”

Los Angeles Times

“A monumental effort.”

New York Review of Books

( link)

“Horvath seems to be channeling, all at once, Borges and Calvino and Kevin Brockmeier. And it all works.”

Rebecca Makkai, author of The Borrower

The Sojourn is a work of uncommon strength by a writer of rare and powerful elegance about a war, now lost to living memory, that echoes in headlines of international strife to this day.”

Mary Doria Russell, author of The Sparrow and The Women of the Copper County

“A fascinating, well-documented biography.”

New York Times Book Review

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“Tim Horvath is a fluid, inventive writer who deftly interweaves the palpably real and the pyrotechnically fantastic. At once playful, deeply moving, and sharply funny, Understories satisfies the mind, the heart, and the gut.”

Kate Christensen, author of The Astral and The Great Man

“One of the best critiques of current K-12 mathematics education I have ever seen, written by a first-class research mathematician who elected to devote his teaching career to K-12 education.”

Keith Devlin, NPR’s “Math Guy”

The Sojourn is a fiercely wrought novel, populated by characters who lead harsh, even brutal lives, which Krivak renders with impressive restraint, devoid of embellishment or sentimentality. And yet—almost despite such a stoic prose style—his sentences accrue and swell and ultimately break over a reader like water: they are that supple and bracing and shining.”

Leah Hager Cohen, author of The Grief of Others and Strangers and Cousins

“Denis Diderot wrote that the organs of the body have their particular history, their infancy, youth, and senility. Each one has a biography. In Pale Faces, Dr. Charles L. Bardes has shown himself a wonderful biographer of the blood-forming system. His depiction of the origin, vicissitudes, and, in a word, the silent majesty of the structures that make and destroy the blood, is no less than masterful.”

F. Gonzalez-Crussi, MD, author of On Seeing and On Being Born

“Finely honed flashes of pure scientific writing.”

Kirkus Reviews

“The stark but rich simplicity of the epitaph on Boltzmann’s tomb provides the link for the steps in Bill Green’s engaging journey in search of science. This is a personal journey, rich in erudite and felicitously expressed sensitive observation and an utter joy to read. Go on this journey with him, and encounter the human side of science and its rewards: you too will be rewarded.”

Peter Atkins, author of Four Laws That Drive the Universe and Galileo’s Finger: The Ten Great Ideas of Science

“An autobiography, a meditation on chance, a luminous retracing of the path of discovery … ­the pleasures of this book are many, but what makes it glow with beauty is one thing, Bill Green’s sure confidence that science is an exercise of the imagination.”

Francis Spufford, author of I May Be Some Time

“Bill Green’s work and writing prove over and over again that C.P. Snow was flat wrong when he claimed that science and art are separate and mutually incomprehensible cultures. This wonderful scientific memoir captures the romance and beauty of research in precise poetic prose that is as gorgeous and evocative as anything written by Rilke, painted by Seurat, or played by Casals.”

Mary Doria Russell, author of Doc and Dreamers of the Day

“Blending analysis and lyricism, Green’s engaging tale begins and ends in wonder, with illuminating, provocative, and, occasionally, heartbreaking stops in between. Always searching for underlying patterns in nature but also keenly aware of the fateful role of randomness, Green makes a convincing case that science is a uniquely human endeavor; the universe, a place that’s uniquely suited to human inquiry and imagination.”

Edwin Dobb, feature writer, Harper’sThe New York Times MagazineNational Geographic

“A radiant love letter to science from a scientist with a poet’s soul . . . Green is an exquisite writer, and his fierce focus and mastery of style are reminiscent of the biologist and essayist Lewis Thomas.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“[Green’s] writing is always graceful, often lyrical. This is science by way of Camus . . . a book ‘about time and chance and dreams we bring with us and which shape who we are and what we become.’”

Publishers Weekly

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“An excellent piece of science writing. . . . Cassidy does not so much exculpate Heisenberg as explain him, with a transparency that makes this biography a pleasure to read.”

Los Angeles Times

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“With Awkward: A Detour, Mary Cappello becomes to my mind now the Kepler of human flesh and bone and of the soul of the worlds in which they move….Hers is a wonderful, suddenly essential book.”

Donald Revell, author of The Art of Attention: A Poet’s Eye and Tantivy

“Daring in both content and form, Awkward is a wonderfully unpredictable riff on the human predicament.”

Dawn Raffel, author of Carrying the Body and The Secret Life of Objects

“An original, psychologically and culturally insightful book, a great pleasure to read.”

Josip Novakovich, author of Infidelities: Stories of War and Lust and April Fool’s Day

“At once comforting and startling….Cappello’s adventurous meditation…makes memory seem like something worth re-making, and not the casual currency it has become. It is a remarkable achievement.”

Adam Phillips, author of Going Sane and Missing Out: In Praise of the Unlived Life

“With keen skills of observation and careful attention to language, Cappello has crafted an elegant illustration of her conclusion that ‘awkwardness isn’t something to grow out of but to grow into.'”

Publishers Weekly

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“With riveting images and moving words, this book provides a powerful and inspiring portrait of the far-reaching impact of mental illness in our lives today.”

Devra Lee Davis, National Book Award Finalist and author of The Secret History of the War on Cancer

“A timely and engaging book that mixes both heartfelt journalism and emotionally engaging photography. I comment as [the second of three generations] with bipolar disorder and as a psychiatrist who specializes in the treatment of serious and persistent mood disorders.”

Dr. Suzanne Vogel-Scribilia, Former President of NAMI

“Evocative images, eloquent testimony—a frank and often inspiring exploration of the experience of mental illness.”

Peter D. Kramer, author of Freud: Inventor of the Modern Mind and Listening to Prozac

“Charles L. Bardes writes with a wonderfully creative and richly literate style. . . . It is an illusion unmasked in this interesting and rewarding book that diseases are technical things separate from the world of language and meanings in which we are all immersed.”

Eric Cassell, author of The Nature of Suffering and the Goals of Medicine

“The most literate popularizer of Darwinism since Thomas Huxley…. A journey to the center of human nature, where the view is not always agreeable.”

Kirkus Reviews

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