“Charles L. Bardes writes with a wonderfully creative and richly literate style. . . . It is an illusion unmasked in this interesting and rewarding book that diseases are technical things separate from the world of language and meanings in which we are all immersed.”

Eric Cassell, author of The Nature of Suffering and the Goals of Medicine

“The most literate popularizer of Darwinism since Thomas Huxley…. A journey to the center of human nature, where the view is not always agreeable.”

Kirkus Reviews

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“Barash is one of the wittiest and most insightful commentators on the current academic scene, especially as it relates to biology, the humanities, and the study of human nature.”

Steven Pinker, author of The Blank Slate

“Combining humane sensibility with commonsense, wisdom, knowledge, wit, and sheer intelligence, David Barash’s writing is a tonic for the mind.”

Richard Dawkins, author of The God Delusion

“‘Touche,’ the slashing fencer shouts in Thurber’s celebrated cartoon, while the sliced head hardly knows what’s hit it. Such is the fate of sacred cows that find themselves in the path of the redoubtable David Barash.”

Harold Fromm, Co-editor of the Ecocriticism Reader

“David Barash’s lively yet serious writing provides an intelligent, expert introduction to the latest and best evolutionary thinking about human behavior.”

Ellen Dissanaykae, author of Homo Aestheticus

Natural Selections picks up where Steven Jay Gould left off. A delightful read.”

Michael Shermer, author of Why Darwin Matters

“The writing is lucid, lively, and imaginative, and makes skillful use of analogies.”

Choice

“Absurdly [labeled by] neoconservative David Horowitz as one of America’s 101 most dangerous academics… [author] David Barash’s latest book… seeks to follow the concepts of evolutionary psychology and sociobiology to their logical conclusions.”

L.A. Weekly

( link)

“…entertaining and thought-provoking.”

Steven Pinker, author of The Blank Slate

“Combining humane sensibility with commonsense, wisdom, knowledge, wit, and sheer intelligence, David Barash’s writing is a tonic for the mind.”

Richard Dawkins, author of The God Delusion

“Charles L. Bardes’s meditations on medicine . . . are beautifully—transparently—written, deeply informed, consistently probing the implications of their subject matter, and they carry surprise.”

Sven Birkerts, from “Charles Bardes, An Appreciation,” Agni

( link)

“An appetizing smorgasbord of stories of considerable erudition and wide interest. For readers seeking intellectual entertainment and exploration, this is a delightful book.”

Choice

“Bardes casts a wide net over science, literature and philosophy in this marvelously literate study.  . . . Readers with a passion for multidisciplinary and well-crafted writing will find pleasure here.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Remarkable writing and remarkably rewarding reading: stories equally saturated in contemporary fact and transfactual acids. An atlas of canny and uncanny maps, mainly cityscapes, of the branching imagination and convoluted heart. Move over, Mercator and Google Earth: make way for Horvath’s haunting projections.”

Brian Boyd, author of Stalking Nabokov

Understories is fueled by a wonderfully inventive mind, but ultimately, it is a mind in service to the heart. Horvath’s attention is always squarely on us: who we are, who we have been, and how a great story can transform us.”

Matt Bell, author of Cataclysm Baby

“For any memoirist writing today, but particularly for one whose class, ethnicity, and sexuality may have left her with the feeling that she’s ‘still arriving,’ there’s strong motivation to stick to the interstate, hoping it will lead to a stunning epiphany, a twelve-city book tour, and a fat movie deal. I find something bracingly feminist, daringly queer, and poignantly democratic in Mary Cappello’s choice to take the nearest exit. Her rare articulation of life’s off-kilter moments makes me feel less alone in my own awkward interior.”

Women’s Review of Books

“Horvath knows how to write one kick-arse sentence after another.”

Bosco’s Going Down

( link)

“Wonderful. . . . In evocative language, Green successfully moves between arresting natural history and sophisticated but accessible philosophy of science. . . . With gripping accounts of a number of near death experiences added to the mix, the whole is a thoroughly enjoyable and remarkably informative exposition of the life of a field scientist.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Mary Cappello[’s] inventive, associative taxonomy of discomfort . . . [is] revelatory indeed.”

Mark Doty, author of Dog Years: A Memoir and Fire to Fire: New and Selected Poems

“Horvath’s strength is absolutely concept: he imagines places and scenarios, and ‘what ifs’ himself into the most interesting premises.”

Brunette Bibliophile

( link)

“A wonderful, multi-layered piece of writing, with all the insight of great cultural criticism and all the emotional pull of memoir. A fascinating book.”

Sarah Waters, author of The Night Watch and The Little Stranger

“Poetic and passionate. . . . Green affirms the fact that science, like art, is rooted in pure imagination.”

Booklist (starred review)

( link)

“Just enough off kilter to make one feel a touch dizzy. I loved this collection, and savored it over many months.”

Reading the Leaves

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“Mightily fun . . . in turns vibrant and imaginative, eloquent and thoughtful, and lush and whimsical.”

Books Speak Volumes

( link)

“A magical work of meditation and precise science.”

ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment

“Elegant . . . there is so much to appreciate in these intelligent and eloquently written, yet deceivingly understated stories.”

Books, Personally

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“The big stories are magnificent—truly they are—but the little ones are gems as well; do not overlook the charming little bodegas and mom & pop shops while you are agape in wonder at the loftier architecture.”

A Just Recompense

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“Compelling. . . . This book is not only filled with wonder, but also hope.”

Cincinnati Post

“Philosophical, sometimes whimsical, darkly funny, thought provoking, intense, evocative.”

Bookconscious

( link)

“A lucid, wondrous account. . . . This authoritative yet lyrical book blends science with art in the enthusiasm that Green feels at being the creator of a new understanding where none was before.”

Winston-Salem Journal

“With plenty of humor and a good dose of poignancy, Understories is an excellent assortment for those who want something that blends traditional and speculative fiction together well.”

Midwest Book Review

( link)

“Some of the prettiest prose ever devoted to the subject of water and lakes and rivers, clouds and rain and fog. A beautiful little book; it will go on the shelf with the other books I read for the love of their words.”

Houston Chronicle

“These stories are triumphs of the imagination.”

Fantasy Literature

( link)

“Every echo, despite its resonance, is a kind of individual pocket. . . . As a fiction collection, then, Understories resonates not only on the stories as stories, but as an arrangement of individual parts. The buzz it gives off is the combined buzz of countless pockets, all charged with a life and surprise of their own.”

Collagist

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“Among his many accomplishments, [Green] offhandedly makes the vocabulary of science accessible to the lay reader. He is at ease in the kingdom of poetry—just as much as he is (warily) at ease in the frozen and eerily beautiful Antarctic landscape.”

Boston Globe

“Horvath’s writing is so consistently fun, engaging, inventive, and imaginative while displaying such range between stories, that the reader will never grow bored.”

Small Press Book Review

( link)

“Some books inspire, others seize. Understories seizes, shakes, then splits everything open.”

Punchnel’s

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“Brilliant. . . . Resembles at various times the work of Stephen Jay Gould, Loren Eiseley and Barry Lopez, but also Primo Levi’s The Periodic Table and the poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins and the writer of Ecclesiastes. It’s the kind of book that makes the reviewer want to quote whole paragraphs.”

Plain Dealer

“A wild ride. [Understories] is a highly inventive short story collection that interweaves absurdity with a deep understanding of what makes people tick.”

Kenyon Review

( link)

“Nature writing of a very high order. . . . A joyride for those who enjoy deep explorations of logic, human frailty and the laws of nature.”

San Francisco Chronicle

( link)

“This collection stand[s] out. There’s plenty of imagination [in Understories] but it’s rooted in recognizable and occasionally irrational emotions, a human quality that makes these stories endure. . . . Below the striking imagery, there’s abundant emotional depth to be found.”

Vol. 1 Brooklyn

( link)

“[Green’s] prose rings with the elemental clarity of the ice he knows so well.”

PEN Awards Committee citation

“As any great book, Understories confronts the making of fiction itself, intermittently directly confronting the mechanics of fabrication. . . . A major accomplishment by a major writer . . . full of writing as deeply aware of its antecedents as it is aware of the possibilities within, of, and about narrative.”

Big Other

( link)

“Weird and wonderful. . . . But for all th[e] playfulness—sometimes intellectual, sometimes bawdy—Understories is no rarefied exercise. Horvath rallies all the senses, smell and touch and taste and the others, in support of his interrogation of the universe, and his work is firmly grounded in the real world no matter how fantastic his musings.”

Bloom

( link)

“Touching and captivating . . . though I may have come to Understories for the weirdness, I stayed around for the quality of the writing and the emotions of the characters.”

InDigest

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“This is transformative prose at its best…. If you want an actual contemporary wordsmith who does not just tinker but thrives in the micro-worlds of Calvino and Borges, Walser and Perec, read Understories.

HTML Giant

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“Gets at the heart of our contemporary zeitgeist . . . Echoing the intricate metaphysical labyrinths of Borges, the philosophizing literary absurdity of David Foster Wallace, and the American-styled magical realism of Lethem, [Understories] is a deeply reflective, highly imaginative work.”

Tottenville Review

( link)

“This stunning collection revels in wordplay and inventiveness, and is one of the finest short fiction collections I have read all year.”

Largehearted Boy

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“Horvath doesn’t just tell a story, he gives readers a window into the hearts, minds and souls of his characters.”

Concord Monitor

( link)

“Rendered in spare, elegant prose, yet rich in authentic detail. . . . [The Sojourn] stands with the most memorable stories about World War I.”

Foreword Reviews

“Profound… with more to say on the human condition than most full books. …A remarkable collection, with pitch-perfect leaps of imagination.”

Minneapolis Star Tribune

( link)

“My favorite collection of short stories in recent memory.”

Nancy Pearl, NPR Morning Edition

( link)

“The prose echoes Faulkner, and Krivak shows us the little-known Italian front of WWI in fascinating episodes.”

Booklist

( link)

“Beautiful. . . . Deftly wrought. . . . Krivak studied all the Great War novels before writing, and the result is a debut novel at home amongst those classics. Highly recommended.”

Historical Novels Review (Editors’ Choice review)

( link)

“Charged with emotion and longing . . . this lean, resonant debut is an undeniably powerful accomplishment.”

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

( link)

“Assured, meditative. . . . Krivak has his own voice, given to lyrical observations on the nature of human existence.”

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

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“Unsentimental yet elegant. . . . With ease, [The Sojourn] joins the ranks of other significant works of fiction portraying World War I.”

Library Journal (starred review)

( link)

“No one is quite so brilliant at voicing the all-but-impossible-to-track interior lives of the most complex human beings as is Melissa Pritchard . . . there is so much energy and inventiveness!  Her linguistic flexibility is stunning, comic and gravely substantial. At its heart is always the troubled, often confused but courageous and tenacious human heart.”

Brad Watson, author of Aliens in the Prime of Their Lives and The Heaven of Mercury

“Fueled by roofless imagination and fearless curiosity The Odditorium is a case study in how one writer’s wisdom and empathy transforms known facts of existence into something more than magic. Pritchard draws from the cold, deep well of myth, legend, and history to redefine what narrative can do. Each story is a lesson in compassion. Each story is nothing short of genius.  Each story was written for you.”

Gina Ochsner, author of The Russian Dreambook of Color and Flight

The Odditorium is a dazzling wonderment, its cast drawn from the far-flung corners of history and imagination, its language crystalline and high-voltage, its stories fearless and even visionary. Here is an irresistible curiosity cabinet of the famous, the infamous, the mysterious, the half-forgotten—conjured with prodigious empathy, wit, and energy by one of our finest writers. Melissa Pritchard is a treasure and this book is her glorious trove.”

Bradford Morrow, author of The Diviner’s Tale and The Uninnocent

“Faith—hope for the future, the conversion of tragedy into meaning—lurks throughout The Sojourn’s lush and lyrical prose.”

Image

( link)

“In this thrillingly protean collection of stories, Melissa Pritchard has done something profound.  By imagining her way into historical moments and illuminating their shadows, she amplifies the music of history so we hear beautifully strange, wondrous notes we never knew were there. These stories resound with a fierce yet playful intelligence and a rare, magnificent generosity.”

Maud Casey, author of Genealogy

“Melissa Pritchard has her GPS set to find the how it is—out there and in the heart—and she makes her way forward with her language on high alert. The prose is rhythmically astute, finely pitched, serving both imagination and witness.”

Sven Birkerts, author of The Gutenberg Elegies: The Fate of Reading in an Electronic Age and editor of AGNI

“Melissa Pritchard’s The Odditorium is as strange, wonderful, and (most important) as much fun as anything good old Robert LeRoy Ripley could ever have envisioned. Passionate, bold imaginings that illuminate the darkest, most precious reaches of our lives. Believe it: these stories are a gift.”

Pinckney Benedict, author of Miracle Boy

“Inventive and satisfying . . . each story is a unique reading experience.”

Forever Overhead

( link)

“Charmingly bizarre . . . [Pritchard] shows she can write—and think—magically.”

Reeling and Writhing and Fainting in Coils

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“A fairly short, brisk story that covers a lot of ground. . . . Beautifully written and uplifting even through all the tragedy.”

Press-Telegram

( link)

“Great storytelling and fantastic writing. I highly recommend The Odditorium to readers who enjoyed high-quality short stories and lovers of literary fiction.”

Magic Lasso

( link)

“The breadth of [Melissa Pritchard’s] scholarship and imagination, and her accomplished prose left me dazzled. . . . Hers are stories that educate you. . . . If there is risk in being imaginative and stepping outside of certain norms for publishers, then Ms. Pritchard and all of her editors are risk-takers and her readers are beneficiaries.”

Whitelaw: From Books to Law

( link)

“The beauty of Pritchard’s short story collection begins with the cover design, which depicts the corner of what looks like a natural history museum with large, frightening fish. Inside, there’s an equally unusual collection of tales, most of them taking the reader to distant lands, distant times.”

Quivering Pen

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“[The Sojourn] deserves to be placed on the same shelf as Remarque, Hemingway and Heller. . . . Krivak has written an anti-war novel with all the heat of a just-fired artillery gun.”

Barnes and Noble Review/Christian Science Monitor

( link)

“Pritchard is one of those amazingly rare contemporary authors whose prose is so lyrical and so thought-provoking that you’re going to want a nice window of quiet time to savor it, like a well poured glass of Malbec on a chilly November evening.”

Brunette Bibliophile

( link)

The Odditorium contains eight ambitious and fantastic stories that transcend genre while fascinating with their language and historical figures brought to life.”

Largehearted Boy

( link)

“Mesh[es] the surreal and metafictional with a deeply-felt humanism.”

Vol. 1 Brooklyn

( link)

“Captivating, thoughtful. . . . A poignant reminder of how humanity was so greatly affected by what was once called the war to end all wars.”

Star Tribune

( link)

“The rewards for a careful expedition into The Odditorium are unforgettable moments of timeless, resonant truth . . . Pritchard’s descriptive talents illuminate not just the emotional depths of her characters but humanity’s physical innards as well.”

Bookslut

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“Humor of life, solemness of its loss, and the heroes who make it happen, The Odditorium is a fine assortment of short fiction, very much recommended.”

Midwest Book Review

( link)

“A classic of war. . . . Beautifully plotted, as rapt and understated as a hymn.”

Plain Dealer

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“Eight off-beat short stories . . . “Captain Brown and the Royal Victoria Hospital,” the volume’s standout . . . is atmospheric, enigmatic, and moving.”

Publishers Weekly

( link)

“Reading Melissa Pritchard’s short-story collection The Odditorium is a bit like peering into a Wunderkammer, one of those magical cabinets where the rich and adventurous used to display their treasures. The beautiful, the grotesque. The odd, the charming . . . Pritchard uses fiction to bring new life to these figures—some famous and mythologized, and others not—blending the historical and the fantastical to create a collection of great charisma.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“Award-winning author Pritchard crosses genres to create energized, fiercely atmospheric tales about holy fools, haunted hospitals, Annie Oakley, and more.”

Barbara Hoffert, Library Journal Best Stories Collections of the Year citation

( link)

“A beautiful tale of persistence and dogged survival.”

Los Angeles Times

( link)

“Very clever . . . all the stories carry undertones of darkness that will creep into your soul and plant their desperate seeds deep within.”

Historical Novels Review

( link)

“A master of the form . . . [Pritchard’s] fiction, like the best Gothic classics, makes us feel like we are traveling on a pleasant, meandering river—until we round the last bend and find ourselves on the edge of a waterfall, looking down into the darkest depths of the human soul.”

Washington Independent Review of Books

( link)

The Odditorium is a stunning read, dense and intricately woven, masterfully assembled and sensitively rendered. Pritchard’s text somehow comes across as at once delicate and forceful. Her interest in history—literary and cultural—in this collection adds a depth of focus and an attention to nuance that is truly arresting.”

California Literary Review

( link)

“[A] powerful, assured first novel. . . . If the early pages of The Sojourn sometimes recall Cormac McCarthy (especially The Crossing), the heart of the book is a harrowing portrait of men at war, as powerful as Ernst Junger’s classic Storm of Steel and Isaac Babel’s brutally poetic Red Cavalry stories.”

Washington Post

( link)

“Any great writer does many things at once, of course, but most lead with a particular strength. And then there is Pritchard, who simply turns all the dials up to eleven. In [The Odditorium], more than in previous works, history gives her the best playing field for her considerable energies and produces some of her most moving and satisfying stories to date.”

Image: Art, Faith, Mystery

( link)

“Weird and wonder-filled.”

Albuquerque Journal

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“Splendid. . . . A novel for anyone who has a sharp eye and ear for life.”

NPR All Things Considered

( link)

“Pritchard’s best stories are ambitious, lush and even thrilling. She takes risks, different risks in different stories. Can she write a segment in the form of a comedic Shakespearean dialogue? She can. Does a story evolve into epistolary form? It does. Will she be able to build a story around the format of an old newspaper feature? She will. Can she do it all with poetic, vivid prose? With one hand tied behind her back. Is Melissa Pritchard someone whose short fiction should be well known? Do you even have to ask?”

Los Angeles Times

( link)

“Pritchard’s exuberant prose is perfectly suited to carry the antic freight of these often bizarre, always cerebral stories. . . . This is a fulsome compendium of ripping good yarns.”

Minneapolis Star Tribune

( link)

“Pritchard polishes the strange and makes it shine. . . . These are stories full of holy living creatures.”

San Francisco Chronicle

( link)

“A gripping and harrowing war story that has the feel of a classic.”

NPR “Year’s Top Book Club Picks” citation

( link)

“With unforced elegance, this novel renders the journey of a young man who leaves his impoverished shepherd’s life behind for the World War I killing fields of Europe.”

Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers committee citation

“Melissa Pritchard’s aptly titled The Odditorium considers the inner lives of the strange, the damaged and the forgotten . . . with its zest for the macabre and its time-spanning imaginative appetite . . . the singularity of her narrators remains indelible [and] shows that fiction still has the ability to shock and surprise.”

Washington Post

( link)

“[An] exquisite first novel. . . . Full of violence and beauty, Krivak shares a unique story about a boy becoming a man during a tragic period in world history.”

Sherri Gallentine, Vroman’s Bookstore, Indie Next List citation

( link)

The Sojourn is a beautifully told story of a young man’s coming of age in World War I Austria. It is quiet, serene, and filled with humanity, even while recounting scenes of violence and war.”

Miami-Dade Public Library System, Dublin Literary Award Longlist citation

( link)

“The stories in this strange and original collection bend genres—horror, mystery, western—into wondrous new shapes.”

O, The Oprah Magazine

( link)

“A novel of uncommon lyricism and moral ambiguity that balances the spare with the expansive.”

Chautauqua Prize committee citation

( link)

“Emotionally rich.”

New York Times

( link)

“A writer at the height of her powers.”

Oprah.com

( link)

“A story that celebrates, in its stripped down but resonant fashion, the flow between creation and destruction we all call life.”

Dayton Literary Peace Prize judges’ citation

( link)

“Some writers are good at drawing a literary curtain over reality, and then there are writers who raise the veil and lead us to see for the first time. Krivak belongs to the latter. The Sojourn, about a war and a family and coming-of-age, does not present a single false moment of sentimental creation. Rather, it looks deeply into its characters’ lives with wisdom and humanity, and, in doing so, helps us experience a distant past that feels as if it could be our own.”

National Book Award judges’ citation

“A work of great power and originality. There is a striking freedom of style here, which allows the author to move without any sense of strain or loss of balance from the visionary and ecstatic to the exquisitely precise. The novel is compelling to read, sometimes horrific, and deeply moving because it is woven together into the single quilt of our humanity.”

Barry Unsworth, author of Sacred Hunger and The Quality of Mercy

Tinkers is truly remarkable. It achieves and sustains a unique fusion of language and perception. Its fine touch plays over the textured richnesses of very modest lives, evoking again and again a frisson of deep recognition, a sense of primal encounter with the brilliant, elusive world of the senses. It confers on the reader the best privilege fiction can afford, the illusion of ghostly proximity to other human souls.”

Marilynne Robinson, author of Gilead and What Are We Doing Here?

“Paul Harding’s Tinkers is not just a novel—though it is a brilliant novel. It’s an instruction manual on how to look at nearly everything. Harding takes the back off to show you the miraculous ticking of the natural world, the world of clocks, generations of family, an epileptic brain, the human soul. In astounding language sometimes seemingly struck by lightning, sometimes as tight and complicated as clockwork, Harding shows how enormous fiction can be, and how economical. Read this book and marvel.”

Elizabeth McCracken, author of Thunderstruck and Bowlaway

“A complex reflection on memory, consciousness, and the meaning of life.”

Diane Rehm, Diane Rehm Show “Readers’ Review” Book Club

( link)

“A novel that you’ll want to savor. . . . I found reading it to be an incredibly moving experience. . . . This book begs to be read aloud.”

Nancy Pearl, KUOW.org

( link)

“Filled with lovely Whitmanesque descriptions of the natural world, this slim novel gives shape to the extraordinary variety in the thoughts of otherwise ordinary men.”

Kirkus Reviews

( link)

“Outstanding. . . . The real star is Harding’s language, which dazzles whether he’s describing the workings of clocks, sensory images of nature, the many engaging side characters who populate the book, or even a short passage on how to build a bird nest. This is an especially gorgeous example of novelistic craftsmanship.”

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

( link)

“Writing with breathtaking lyricism and tenderness, Harding has created a rare and beautiful novel of spiritual inheritance and acute psychological and metaphysical suspense.”

Booklist (starred review)

( link)

“This excellent debut proves Harding to be a writer of exceptional poise, possessing clear-eyed skill and, like his characters, a steady hand for the finest of details.”

Rumpus

( link)

“A luminous novel . . . that is not about death but instead an investi­gation into what life is all about. . . . The precipice is what Harding is so concentrated on, as though he were holding a magnifying glass up under bright sunlight and setting fire to the page.”

Quarterly Conversation 

( link)

“Unique, captivating, and a measure more magical than most other contemporary novels.”

Guernica

( link)

“Harding is a first-rate writer, and his fascination with what makes his characters tick recommends him as a philosopher, as well.”

Time Out Chicago

( link)

“Sometimes a novel beguiles from the opening sentence. Paul Harding’s seductive Pulitzer-winning debut does precisely that [and] the prism of an entire world emerges. . . . The story and the stories within it flow like water over stones.”

Irish Times

( link)

“Among the many triumphs of this novel, Harding enables a reader to look at the world differently.”

Telegraph

( link)

“The most captivating exploration of history, time and human consciousness. . . . An expert piece of historical and psychological archaeology, which unpicks the (bewitching) intricacies of ordinary life while also asking the terrifying, unanswerable, yet endlessly fascinating questions that haunt us all.”

Guardian

( link)

“Tantalizing. . . . Tinkers takes an uncompromising look at the complex emotional geometry that exists between parents and children.”

London Review of Books

( link)

“This is a book so meticulously assembled that vocabulary choices like ‘craquelure’ and ‘scrieved’—far from seeming pretentious—serve as reminders of how precise and powerful a tool good English can be.”

Christian Science Monitor

( link)

“Stunning. . . . Harding, who apprenticed with his horologist grandfather, uses the clock as a metaphor for the cosmos and its deeper intricacies and mysteries.”

Courier-Journal

“This beautiful novel is sui generis; the most insignificant events . . . radiate fire and light.”

Star Tribune

( link)

“Vivid and original. . . . Tinkers [is] going to be around for a long, long time.”

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

“The life and death questions Paul Harding raises in Tinkers, as well as the richness of his writing, keep a reader coming back to it. . . . Like Faulkner, he never shies away from describing what seems impossible to put into words.”

Dallas Morning News 

“Few contemporary writers have [Harding’s] gift for uniting language and nature through a powerful imagination. Tinkers is a father-son story told with skill, depth and beauty.”

Concord Monitor

( link)

Tinkers is a poignant exploration of where we may journey when the clock has barely a tick or two left and we really can’t go any­where at all.”

Boston Globe

( link)

“In Paul Harding’s stunning first novel, we find what readers, writ­ers and reviewers live for.”

San Francisco Chronicle

( link)

“[An] astonishing novel.”

Los Angeles Times

( link)

“Alive with gorgeous sentences.”

Elle 

( link)

“This compact, adamantine debut dips in and out of the consciousness of a New England patriarch. . . . In Harding’s skillful evocation, Crosby’s life, seen from its final moments, becomes a mosaic of memories.”

New Yorker

( link)

“Quiet, moving, breathtakingly crafted.”

Library Journal Best Books of the Year citation

“A novel with an old-­fashioned meditative quality so perfectly done that it is refreshing to read in a world filled with noises and false excitements. . . . It brings the reader to a closer understand­ing of his own life than he could have imagined before taking the journey.”

Granta Best Books of the Year citation

“There are few perfect debut American novels. . . . To this list ought to be added Paul Harding’s devastating first book, Tinkers. . . . Harding has written a masterpiece.”

NPR Best Debut Fiction of the Year citation

( link)

“An exquisitely written novel that captures the mysteries of relationships, memories and time passing in language that is both spare and lyrical. It is a true gem that sparkles with thoughtfulness, intelligence and life.”

New Hampshire State Library, International DUBLIN Literary Award Longlist citation

( link)

“[Tinkers is a novel] we hear customers hand-selling to other readers in that you’ve-got-to-read-this voice. The protagonist’s deathbed memories of his father are a meditation on life and death, written in impeccably lovely prose. Tinkers is incomparable.”

Indie Next List for Reading Groups citation by Cheryl McKeon, Book Passage, San Francisco, CA

( link)

“In this lyrical novel, the life of a dying man is examined through the smallest moments of time and memory.”

American Library Association Notable Book citation

( link)

“An exquisite novel . . . told with a voice so keen and beautiful as to leave the reader in a state of excitement produced only by literature, and the best literature at that.”

PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize judges’ citation

( link)

“A powerful celebration of life in which a New England father and son, through suffering and joy, transcend their imprisoning lives and offer new ways of perceiving the world and mortality.”

Pulitzer Prize citation

( link)

“A fair and brilliantly written tour de force of this long forgotten war. A book that is long overdue.”

Roma Tearne, author of The Mosquito

“When I was commissioned to do this report, the first thing I was handed was a copy of The Cage. Weiss’s scrupulously balanced account should serve as a guidepost for decision-makers and scholars of international affairs. A book can change the world.”

Charles Petrie, diplomat and author of the United Nations “Petrie Report” into the UN’s role and responsibilities during the Sri Lankan conflict

The Cage is a comprehensive and compellingly readable account of one of the very worst atrocity stories this century. Gordon Weiss is scrupulously evenhanded in describing the terrible excesses of the Tamil Tigers as well as the Sri Lankan authorities. His book is a timely prod to the world’s collective conscience.”

Gareth Evans, former Foreign Minister of Australia, Co-Chair of the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty, and author of The Responsibility to Protect: Ending Mass Atrocity Crimes Once and For All

“This shattering, heartbreaking tale of savagery and suffering not only lifts the veil that conceals one of the most awful tragedies of the current era, but also helps us understand what should be done, not just in this sad and beautiful land, but long before other such horrors spiral out of control.”

Noam Chomsky, Institute Professor & Professor of Linguistics, MIT, and author of Hopes and Prospects

“Some of the best coverage of Sri Lanka right now is coming from Gordon Weiss.”

Nick Bryant, BBC News correspondent

“[The Cage] raises . . . the question of how witnesses should respond to alleged war crimes, human rights violations, and the breakdown of the rule of law. A sweeping discussion. . . . Weiss deftly sketches the main issues for a general audience while also providing a solid bibliography and detailed endnotes. The book will appeal to readers interested in Sri Lanka, South Asia, political science, military history, and international relations.”

Asian Ethnology

“An accessible and compelling narrative of Sri Lanka’s often violent and tortured history. . . . Weiss pulls no punches in tackling the atrocities committed by the Tigers. But he is equally scathing about the failure of the successive Sri Lankan administrations to deal with the aspirations of the Tamil minority and brutal tactics employed by the Sri Lankan Army to quash the rebellion.”

Australian

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“A courageous document that holds to account the brutality of a rogue state that is all too often simply seen as a beautiful tourist destination.”

Sydney Morning Herald

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“[A] painstakingly researched and referenced study, and [Weiss’] conclusions are nothing short of horrific.”

Scotsman

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“A striking account of the ruthless terror wreaked by both sides on the innocent civilians.”

Sunday Times

“One of the best books published by an Australian this year . . . Himself the grandson of a man who was murdered in Auschwitz, Weiss is aware of the thin line that separates civilised societies from those that sink into collective madness governed by hatred.”

Spectator

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“Weiss excels at chronicling the changes in attitude of the post-9/11 world and the changing geopolitical landscape. . . . For those interested in this modern human rights tragedy and how basic political rights get shredded by both the government and the freedom fighters, then The Cage is a must read.”

CCLaP: Chicago Center for Literature and Photography

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“A potent analysis.”

Los Angeles Review of Books

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“Gripping. . . . [The Cage] is not only a good starting point for understanding contemporary Sri Lankan history, but also offers a beautifully articulated insight into the human experience.”

Intercept

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“The general outlines of this story are familiar. But Weiss, a UN official in Colombo at the time, provides harrowing details, as well as insight into the decades of brutal conflict that brought the two sides to the point where they were willing to commit war crimes.”

Foreign Affairs

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“An excellent account of how [the government] victory was won, and of the price paid for the present peace by Sri Lankans. . . . Scrupulously fair.”

Economist

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“Mr. Weiss accurately lays out the central challenges that regional actors, nongovernmental organizations and the international community face in Sri Lanka: ensuring accountability for possible war crimes, and a life of dignity and equality for all Sri Lankan citizens. . . . This powerful book is a haunting reminder of the price countries in the developing world pay for the flawed choices of their founders.”

Wall Street Journal

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The Cage is a tightly written and clear-eyed narrative about one of the most disturbing human dramas of recent years. . . . A riveting, cautionary tale about the consequences of unchecked political power in a country at war. A must-read.”

Jon Lee Anderson, New Yorker staff writer and author of The Fall of Baghdad